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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Friends,

I am about to do health assessment for me and my family. This is regarding the questionnaire. My wife (she is 35 years) had diabetes at the time of pregnancy, and once about 2 months before we tested, she had a little on fasting. Right now she does not have and she is not taking any tablet.

I am not sure what to fill in for the question: Do you have diabetes.. As of now she is not diabetic, but she had a brief history of that.

Similarly, it could happen that some of the ailments asked there could be there, but we might know until the test is done. So is there any issue if there is a contradiction in the result with our declaration? What is the consequence?

Please advise.

Thanks,
Mathew
 

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If I were you I'd report it and make a note of it as gestational diabetes during and briefly after pregnancy. It's possible the panel doctor will ask for some more information, but it's not uncommon so unlikely to be an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If I were you I'd report it and make a note of it as gestational diabetes during and briefly after pregnancy. It's possible the panel doctor will ask for some more information, but it's not uncommon so unlikely to be an issue.
Thanks Maggie for this. Also, please let me know if there is any chance of denying visa on the grounds of having Diabetes or Auto-immune diseases ?


Thanks & Regards,
Mathew
 

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If they are chronic conditions, there's always a chance, which is why it's usually suggested you use a migration agent that has experience with medical issues (George Lombard and Peter Bollard are the two typically recommended). If it's a short-term condition such as gestational diabetes, I think the chance of it causing a problem with the application are very slim.
 

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Thanks Maggie for this. Also, please let me know if there is any chance of denying visa on the grounds of having Diabetes or Auto-immune diseases ?


Thanks & Regards,
Mathew
I have diabetes type 2 for last 5 years + blood pressure. During medicals my BP was 150/80. I had no issues related to medicals. Got my 189 Visa on 16th Jun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Maggie and Khalida. My wife is found to be pre-diabetic with a reading of 111 mg/dl. In many places, I found that the upto 100 is normal, 100-125 is considered pre-diabetic, and above 125 is diabetic.

So, with 111 mg/dl, should I mention her condition as diabetic?

Thanks,
Mathew
 

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Diabetes wont affect your visa outcome. read the article below and I hope it helps.
Fact Sheet 22—The Health Requirement
On this page

Background
Health checks required
The decision process
Specific diseases or tests
Other tests
More information

Australia enjoys some of the best health standards in the world. In order to maintain these standards people who want to migrate permanently, or stay in Australia temporarily, must satisfy the health requirement specified in the Migration Regulations.

Applicants for certain visas also need to have adequate health insurance cover for the duration of their stay in Australia.

Background
The health requirement is designed to:

minimise public health and safety risks to the Australian community
contain public expenditure on health and community services, including Australian social security benefits, allowances and pensions
maintain access of Australian residents to health and other community services.
In line with Australia's global non-discriminatory immigration policy, the health requirement applies equally to all applicants from all countries, although the types of health examinations required will vary according to the circumstances of each applicant.

Health checks required
Permanent visa applicants

All applicants for permanent visas, including the main applicant, partner and any dependants, must be assessed against the health requirement. Even if the applicant's partner and dependants are not included in the visa application, they must still be assessed against the health requirement.

Applicants for a permanent visa will be asked to undergo a medical examination, an x-ray if 11 years of age or older and an HIV/AIDS test if 15 years of age or older, as well as any additional tests requested by the Medical Officer of the Commonwealth (MOC).

Temporary visa applicants

Applicants for temporary visas may be required to undergo a medical examination, chest x-ray and/or other tests depending on how long they propose to stay in Australia, their intended activities in Australia, their country's risk level for tuberculosis (TB) and other factors.

The department will provide applicants with details of the health checks required.

The decision process
For those applicants who require a medical and/or x-ray examination and a significant medical condition is identified, a MOC will provide the department with an opinion on whether the health requirement has been met.

In doing so they will take into account:

the results of the medical examination(s) and x-ray(s)
medical history, age and period of intended stay in Australia
other relevant considerations.
Under the Migration Regulations, officers deciding visa applications must accept the opinion of the MOC on whether applicants meet the health requirement.

Only TB is mentioned in migration legislation as precluding the grant of a visa, but the applicant is given the opportunity to undergo treatment in most cases. Other health conditions are assessed on the potential cost and impact on the Australian community resulting from the possible use of health and community services.

Some of the visa subclasses within the family and humanitarian migration schemes, as well as a limited number of onshore permanent skilled visas, have a waiver component. Visa applicants must still undertake their required health examinations and be assessed against the health requirement. The waiver allows the visa decision-maker to waive the health requirement after the visa applicant has been assessed by a MOC if they are satisfied that granting a visa would not result in 'undue' health care or community services costs, or 'undue' prejudice to Australians' access to such services. Where a waiver is available, the decision-maker will take into account the applicant's personal circumstances, including their ability to mitigate potential costs and care requirements, and any compassionate and compelling circumstances.

The waiver cannot be exercised where the visa applicant is assessed by a MOC as representing a risk to public health or safety in Australia.

If the applicant does not meet the health requirement and the waiver is unavailable or not exercised, then under the Migration Regulations the application must be refused.

Specific diseases or tests
Tuberculosis (TB)

TB is a serious disease which has been declared an epidemic and a global emergency.

Visa applicants aged 11 years or older must undergo a chest x-ray. Applicants under 11 may be required to have an x-ray if there are indications they have TB or have a history of contact with a person with TB. The purpose of the x-ray is to determine whether there is any evidence of either active or previous TB.

Evidence of active or previous TB will not, in itself, adversely impact on the outcome of the visa application.

Where x-rays show possible evidence of TB, the applicant will be asked to undergo more specific tests to establish whether or not active TB is present.

If active TB is found, Australian migration law does not allow a visa to be granted until the person has undergone treatment and been declared free of active TB. A course of treatment usually lasting between six to nine months is required, plus further testing to show that the treatment has been successful.

If the x-ray shows evidence of previous but now inactive TB the applicant may be asked to sign an undertaking at the time of visa grant.

By signing the undertaking, the applicant agrees to contact the Health Undertaking Service on a free call number on arrival in Australia. The applicant also agrees to report for follow-up monitoring to a state or territory health authority, as directed by the Health Undertaking Service. The visa is not at risk, once in Australia, no matter what status of tuberculosis is diagnosed as a result of the monitoring.

Hepatitis

Although health authorities consider the risk of hepatitis transmission from newly arrived migrants to be low, screening for hepatitis is mandatory where the applicant is any of the following:

pregnant
a child for adoption
an unaccompanied refugee minor child
a temporary visa applicant intending to work as, or to study to be, a doctor, nurse, dentist or paramedic in Australia.
Examining doctors or MOCs may also ask an applicant to undergo tests for hepatitis where they consider it necessary. If the applicant is assessed as having hepatitis a decision on whether the applicant meets the health requirement will be made on the same grounds as any other pre-existing medical condition. The main factor to be taken into account is the cost of the condition to the Australian community for health care and community services.

The applicant may also be asked to give an undertaking to report to the Health Undertaking Service for referral to state or territory health authorities on arrival in Australia.

HIV/AIDS

Permanent visa applicants aged 15 years or older must take an HIV/AIDS test. Permanent applicants less than 15 years old must also take this test if being adopted or there is a history of blood transfusions or other clinical indications.

Temporary visa applicants who intend to work as, or study to become, a doctor, nurse, dentist or paramedic in Australia are required to take an HIV/AIDS test.

If the applicant is found to be HIV positive, a decision on whether the applicant meets the health requirement will be made on the same grounds as with any other pre-existing medical condition. The main factor to be taken into account is the cost of the condition to the Australian community for health care and community services. Standard pre and post-test counselling must be provided by the doctor who examined the applicant.

Other tests
Any other tests may be requested at any time by a MOC.
 

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Can anybody please clarify me My sister is dependent on me as she is handicapped she is having backbone problem that's why she can't walk.
I want to add her in 190 visa
will that affect me adversely
 

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If you are sure , then what should i do
My personal opinion, the issue is if they wont approve your sister to come over, she is tied to you, the logic is they wont give you either.since she needed your support. You can take this shot though it may not be palatable. Apply first, obtain your PR, and later file for her. It may take long but they wont want you to be separated and they wont your cancel visa either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Diabetes wont affect your visa outcome. read the article below and I hope it helps.
Fact Sheet 22—The Health Requirement
On this page

Background
Health checks required
The decision process
Specific diseases or tests
Other tests
More information

Australia enjoys some of the best health standards in the world. In order to maintain these standards people who want to migrate permanently, or stay in Australia temporarily, must satisfy the health requirement specified in the Migration Regulations.

Applicants for certain visas also need to have adequate health insurance cover for the duration of their stay in Australia.

Background
The health requirement is designed to:

minimise public health and safety risks to the Australian community
contain public expenditure on health and community services, including Australian social security benefits, allowances and pensions
maintain access of Australian residents to health and other community services.
In line with Australia's global non-discriminatory immigration policy, the health requirement applies equally to all applicants from all countries, although the types of health examinations required will vary according to the circumstances of each applicant.

Health checks required
Permanent visa applicants

All applicants for permanent visas, including the main applicant, partner and any dependants, must be assessed against the health requirement. Even if the applicant's partner and dependants are not included in the visa application, they must still be assessed against the health requirement.

Applicants for a permanent visa will be asked to undergo a medical examination, an x-ray if 11 years of age or older and an HIV/AIDS test if 15 years of age or older, as well as any additional tests requested by the Medical Officer of the Commonwealth (MOC).

Temporary visa applicants

Applicants for temporary visas may be required to undergo a medical examination, chest x-ray and/or other tests depending on how long they propose to stay in Australia, their intended activities in Australia, their country's risk level for tuberculosis (TB) and other factors.

The department will provide applicants with details of the health checks required.

The decision process
For those applicants who require a medical and/or x-ray examination and a significant medical condition is identified, a MOC will provide the department with an opinion on whether the health requirement has been met.

In doing so they will take into account:

the results of the medical examination(s) and x-ray(s)
medical history, age and period of intended stay in Australia
other relevant considerations.
Under the Migration Regulations, officers deciding visa applications must accept the opinion of the MOC on whether applicants meet the health requirement.

Only TB is mentioned in migration legislation as precluding the grant of a visa, but the applicant is given the opportunity to undergo treatment in most cases. Other health conditions are assessed on the potential cost and impact on the Australian community resulting from the possible use of health and community services.

Some of the visa subclasses within the family and humanitarian migration schemes, as well as a limited number of onshore permanent skilled visas, have a waiver component. Visa applicants must still undertake their required health examinations and be assessed against the health requirement. The waiver allows the visa decision-maker to waive the health requirement after the visa applicant has been assessed by a MOC if they are satisfied that granting a visa would not result in 'undue' health care or community services costs, or 'undue' prejudice to Australians' access to such services. Where a waiver is available, the decision-maker will take into account the applicant's personal circumstances, including their ability to mitigate potential costs and care requirements, and any compassionate and compelling circumstances.

The waiver cannot be exercised where the visa applicant is assessed by a MOC as representing a risk to public health or safety in Australia.

If the applicant does not meet the health requirement and the waiver is unavailable or not exercised, then under the Migration Regulations the application must be refused.

Specific diseases or tests
Tuberculosis (TB)

TB is a serious disease which has been declared an epidemic and a global emergency.

Visa applicants aged 11 years or older must undergo a chest x-ray. Applicants under 11 may be required to have an x-ray if there are indications they have TB or have a history of contact with a person with TB. The purpose of the x-ray is to determine whether there is any evidence of either active or previous TB.

Evidence of active or previous TB will not, in itself, adversely impact on the outcome of the visa application.

Where x-rays show possible evidence of TB, the applicant will be asked to undergo more specific tests to establish whether or not active TB is present.

If active TB is found, Australian migration law does not allow a visa to be granted until the person has undergone treatment and been declared free of active TB. A course of treatment usually lasting between six to nine months is required, plus further testing to show that the treatment has been successful.

If the x-ray shows evidence of previous but now inactive TB the applicant may be asked to sign an undertaking at the time of visa grant.

By signing the undertaking, the applicant agrees to contact the Health Undertaking Service on a free call number on arrival in Australia. The applicant also agrees to report for follow-up monitoring to a state or territory health authority, as directed by the Health Undertaking Service. The visa is not at risk, once in Australia, no matter what status of tuberculosis is diagnosed as a result of the monitoring.

Hepatitis

Although health authorities consider the risk of hepatitis transmission from newly arrived migrants to be low, screening for hepatitis is mandatory where the applicant is any of the following:

pregnant
a child for adoption
an unaccompanied refugee minor child
a temporary visa applicant intending to work as, or to study to be, a doctor, nurse, dentist or paramedic in Australia.
Examining doctors or MOCs may also ask an applicant to undergo tests for hepatitis where they consider it necessary. If the applicant is assessed as having hepatitis a decision on whether the applicant meets the health requirement will be made on the same grounds as any other pre-existing medical condition. The main factor to be taken into account is the cost of the condition to the Australian community for health care and community services.

The applicant may also be asked to give an undertaking to report to the Health Undertaking Service for referral to state or territory health authorities on arrival in Australia.

HIV/AIDS

Permanent visa applicants aged 15 years or older must take an HIV/AIDS test. Permanent applicants less than 15 years old must also take this test if being adopted or there is a history of blood transfusions or other clinical indications.

Temporary visa applicants who intend to work as, or study to become, a doctor, nurse, dentist or paramedic in Australia are required to take an HIV/AIDS test.

If the applicant is found to be HIV positive, a decision on whether the applicant meets the health requirement will be made on the same grounds as with any other pre-existing medical condition. The main factor to be taken into account is the cost of the condition to the Australian community for health care and community services. Standard pre and post-test counselling must be provided by the doctor who examined the applicant.

Other tests
Any other tests may be requested at any time by a MOC.

Thanks fowodu...
 

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If they are chronic conditions, there's always a chance, which is why it's usually suggested you use a migration agent that has experience with medical issues (George Lombard and Peter Bollard are the two typically recommended). If it's a short-term condition such as gestational diabetes, I think the chance of it causing a problem with the application are very slim.
Hi Maggie,

Your posts are very informative and motivating. Thanks...

I have diabetes and under medication. it's under control and reports are also fine. I am in the process of lodging the 457 visa, by my sponsor.

I will declare it int he 457 application form. I am worried, if this will affect my application. ?

Would doctor request for additional tests as part of medicals ?

Please advise.

Thanks
 
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