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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all , i have been trying my absolute best to make heads or tails of the healthcare system with not much luck , basically my position is this , myself age early 50's my wife late twenties and our son aged 6 month will be moving permanently to france late this summer and i was wondering what would be my best plan for health care etc etc and how to go about it . I am in receipt of a government pension which will be my only income and i wont be looking to work neither will my wife for now as we will be doing house up and bringing up our son so my understanding that i am not old enough to be classed as a pensioner, so cannot use the S1 form ???? what can my wife use and how does it work for children please . any help please or advice would be awesome . thank you all in advance .:fingerscrossed:
 

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As I understand it, you need 3 months of "residence" before you can enroll in the French health system. I've heard varying reports, but I think you need to have some form of health insurance at least during those first three months to be considered "legally resident" in France. I'd consider getting a six month to one year health cover policy so that you can show that you're in compliance when you go to apply. The processing takes a bit of time, which is where the "extra" time comes in on the private policy.

Now, where you say you're on a government pension - are you sure you wouldn't be eligible for an S-1? At least ask the question and let them say "no" if that's the case. The fact that you are receiving a pension should allow you to claim the statut of "inactiv" - though it may take a bit of explaining and/or negotiating.

Probably best to start your application for a carte de séjour pretty soon after your arrival, which will ultimately come in handy when you hit the 3 month point and can go to CPAM to apply for the national health coverage. (Just don't forget that the national cover is only partial - roughly 70% of your health care costs. You need to look into the mutuelle question, as that is something you'll have to pay for, on a per person covered basis.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Some experience of my arrival in 2001.

I was aged under 65, but I had decided to" retire" in UK terms without a pension. However, when I went to CPAM to get my carte vitale they demanded to see my "certificat de retrait"...clearly I didn't have one and was put into the category "inactif".

My point is that as you are under the normal retiring age it may be worth asking you uk pension provider to give you this certificate. French administration being what it is, it will make life easier ....."voilà un certificat", with your name, pension £, date of birth etc. French admin works like that!

The regulations have changed a lot for Fr health care since I arrived, so other aspects of my dealings with CPAM are now outdated.

DejW



As I understand it, you need 3 months of "residence" before you can enroll in the French health system. I've heard varying reports, but I think you need to have some form of health insurance at least during those first three months to be considered "legally resident" in France. I'd consider getting a six month to one year health cover policy so that you can show that you're in compliance when you go to apply. The processing takes a bit of time, which is where the "extra" time comes in on the private policy.

Now, where you say you're on a government pension - are you sure you wouldn't be eligible for an S-1? At least ask the question and let them say "no" if that's the case. The fact that you are receiving a pension should allow you to claim the statut of "inactiv" - though it may take a bit of explaining and/or negotiating.

Probably best to start your application for a carte de séjour pretty soon after your arrival, which will ultimately come in handy when you hit the 3 month point and can go to CPAM to apply for the national health coverage. (Just don't forget that the national cover is only partial - roughly 70% of your health care costs. You need to look into the mutuelle question, as that is something you'll have to pay for, on a per person covered basis.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I think you are right about the S1 not being available for (normal) early retirees: it was, up to about 2014, but no longer.

On the next point I'm afraid I don't know the answers can only suggest a question you might want to explore.

There is a difference between what in the UK we call 'state' pensions (i.e. old age pension paid by the UK Government) and 'Government' pensions which you are eligible for after working in certain government services. Since you are below the official retirement age I guess that this second sort is what you receive.

This is where I start to get on shaky ground, sorry. If I understand correctly 'Government' pensions are not taxable in France, but remain taxable in the UK. You might want to take a look at the double-taxation treaty between France and the UK (plus the explanatory notes which are more useful). Because you are taxable in the UK I think but am by no means sure that the UK continues to be responsible for your healthcare costs but I don't know if that means a standard S1 or some other form. If you are covered by the S1 then your wife and child should also be covered but may need separate S1 forms.

Sorry - I did say I had more questions than answers.

Try phoning up the NHS office in Newcastle that deals with the S1 form; but this website is also a good place to start.

The advice to consider taking out insurance is good, but also make sure you have an EHIC card which might help keep the premiums down, although it is only valid for 3 months.

Bit pushed for time right now, but if no-one else does, I'll try to find some useful links over the weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for all your replies, any more advice, please keep it coming. I shall try some of the avenues suggested.

Thanks again
 

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Toulouse Rob wrote : Because you are taxable in the UK I think but am by no means sure that the UK continues to be responsible for your healthcare costs but I don't know if that means a standard S1 or some other form. If you are covered by the S1 then your wife and child should also be covered but may need separate S1 forms.

Indeed you are correct about the rights that that an SI confers. Unfortunately if you retire with a government, ie teachers, pension but under the official UK retirement age you do not qualify for an S1 until you reach your official retirement age.
We came here aged 55 and paid URSSAF each and every year towards our health even when OH started to receive a UK teacher's pension aged 60. This continued until OH reached 65 when he qualified for an S1 and the UK started to pay towards our health costs here.
 

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I promised to find some links ..

Guidance on Double Taxation Relief The discussion about 'Government' pensions starts at the top of page 3 of the notes which offers a further link to an internal HMRC manual here. The actual treaty can be downloaded from here. You'll probably need to consult those in any case, apart from healthcare issues.

The address of the Overseas Healthcare Team is: DWP OHT, Durham House, Washington Centre, Washington, NE38 7SF and (more usefully) the phone number is: 0191 218 1999 I can't find a useful website for them, not sure if one exists. May be best to phone them and chat about the situation.
 

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Toulouse Rob wrote : Because you are taxable in the UK I think but am by no means sure that the UK continues to be responsible for your healthcare costs
AFAIK, in order to be covered under the NHS you need to be:
either resident in the UK
or working"substantially" in the UK (ie that's where most of your working hours are spent)
or in receipt of certain UK benefits which include an age pension, unemployment benefit (time limited) and I believe also certain disability benefits.

I don't think paying tax on a UK govt pension as a non resident entitles you to NHS cover. Plenty of people are early retired in France with UK govt pensions and have their healthcare via PUMA, I don't see why the OP would have a problem.
 

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I don't think paying tax on a UK govt pension as a non resident entitles you to NHS cover. Plenty of people are early retired in France with UK govt pensions and have their healthcare via PUMA, I don't see why the OP would have a problem.
Thanks for the clarification, EuroTrash.
 
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