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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm married, 67 years old, while my wife is 56 & we're legal residents of Costa Rica. Since I am the older one, the questiones & answers should be about me & not my wife who is insurable.
My health is very good. I only take one small BP medication so BP is controlled. We are in the public health care system in CR & use it frequently, but like many people, both Ticos & expats alike, we use both The PUBLIC & PRIVATE systems. So I'm curious if my age will prevent me from entering the PUBLIC system in Mexico or obtaining private Mexican insurance.
I lived in Mexico after Vietnam for 2 1/2 years & graduated from a University there in '77. Ten years ago, we had our honeymonn in Oaxaca & Puebla/Cholula as well as the DF & recently returned.
My problem is, I really like Mexico, but feel the health care issue might prevent it. What say you?
 

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I'm married, 67 years old, while my wife is 56 & we're legal residents of Costa Rica. Since I am the older one, the questiones & answers should be about me & not my wife who is insurable.
My health is very good. I only take one small BP medication so BP is controlled. We are in the public health care system in CR & use it frequently, but like many people, both Ticos & expats alike, we use both The PUBLIC & PRIVATE systems. So I'm curious if my age will prevent me from entering the PUBLIC system in Mexico or obtaining private Mexican insurance.
I lived in Mexico after Vietnam for 2 1/2 years & graduated from a University there in '77. Ten years ago, we had our honeymonn in Oaxaca & Puebla/Cholula as well as the DF & recently returned.
My problem is, I really like Mexico, but feel the health care issue might prevent it. What say you?
Most likely, you'll be able to enroll in the Mexican public health system (IMSS) for a fee of around 4000 pesos a year. From personal experience I can tell you that for anyone over 65, finding private health insurance is very difficult and very expensive if you do find a company that is willing to sell you a policy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Private Insurance

Your answer was good one, quick & to the point.
We plan to visit Oaxaca for 30 days after the new year, I'll check on National healthcare at that time. I guess I would do what I do here, get the National, IMSS, & pay for private out of pocket, wh is still a big savings. Thanks for your quick response.
 

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Your answer was good one, quick & to the point.
We plan to visit Oaxaca for 30 days after the new year, I'll check on National healthcare at that time. I guess I would do what I do here, get the National, IMSS, & pay for private out of pocket, wh is still a big savings. Thanks for your quick response.
Thanks. You won't be able to sign up with IMSS unless you are here on a resident visa, either Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente. Being here on a tourist visa won't do the trick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Healthcare

I appreciate your advice, but I had no intention of actually trying to sign up for it unless we actually move to Mexico & start the residency process. Presently, we live in San Ramon de Alajuela de Costa Rica. We understand Latins pretty well. We are in Latin America because we love it. I always wanted to live in another country, another culture since I was a National Geographic kid. Even today, I think it's the coolest thing one could do. Still, I know it's not for everyone.
Even though, I love CR, my heart is in Mexico. The culture is so darn rich.
Incidentally, my wife,Gloria, bought into the whole thing & loves it as much as me, However, she would just as soon stay put. In less than 5 years we've becomebheavily involved w/ our community & this is a good thing. It only gets better.
 

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Paul:

We arrived in Mexico when I was 59 and my wife was 54 and, at those ages had no trouble finding unlimited, non-cancellable major medical health insurance with a $30,000 Peso deductible but, of course, the premiums go up every year and, now that I am 71 and my wife 66, we are paying the equivalent of about $500USD a month in annual premiums as of 2013 and may find those premiums impossible as we approach our 80s if we are fotunate enough to actually have that problem. No matter how expensive those costs seem, that is for top of the line insurance offering private rooms in the best hospitals in Mexico and utilizing the best physicians available and I compare that with the COLA benefits offered us in the San Francisco Bay Area back when I was 58 and my wife was 53. That was $1,100 per month for the two of us for HMO services from Kaaiser Permanent so this seems a great deal in comparison.

As you surmised, while your wife should have no problem getting major medical insurance, you may have some problems. Perhaps, however, an insurance company may underwrite you as well in order to get your wife´s business. We have an excellent agent out of Guadalajara and insure through AXA, a highly rated international firm. If you go through with your move, PM me and I will send you his name and telephone number so you can discuss these issues with him if you wish.
 

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Note that you cannot move to Mexico and start the residency process. You must start the process by applying at a Mexican consulate in your home country. If approved, you then move to Mexico within six months and report to INM within 30 days to begin the completion process with proof of address, etc.
 

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Presently, we live in San Ramon de Alajuela de Costa Rica. We understand Latins pretty well. We are in Latin America because we love it. ... Incidentally, my wife,Gloria, bought into the whole thing & loves it as much as me, However, she would just as soon stay put. In less than 5 years we've becomebheavily involved w/ our community & this is a good thing. It only gets better.
Apologizing de antemano for thread drift, but I couldn't resist. San Ramon de Alajuela is near and dear to my heart. It's where my Costa Rican "family" lives - one of the daughters in the family lived with my family and me in high school and is truly one of my hermanas. I have gone to stay with them several times over the years - but not nearly often enough in recent years. My now-adult daughter also stayed with this family for an extended visit and attended school for a time in San Ramon.

I remember in the early 80's when we would do the evening stroll around the plaza, greeting everyone we passed, there were often 2 ****** men in guayaberas sitting on the bench, observing passersby. I was told "Son de la CIA" ("They're from the CIA") - whether they were or not I have no idea, but that was the community perception. It sounds like you and your wife have done a much better job of integrating than those two men!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank You. Yes we really love it here. We are very involved wh is a good thing. I'm glad to ear your memories of San Ramon are so dear, but it sounds like it was a long time ago that you were here. It's changed alot, I guess, but still a pretty cool place. About 250 gringos live in the area & about 75000 ticos.
 

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That may pose a problem, but will look into it in the future, but thanks for the good heads up.
Yes, things have changed regarding immigration, and there are now financial requirements to be met. The requirement to apply for residency in your home country is strictly applied, but you might ask at a Mexican consulate in Costa Rica, to see if they mean the country of your citizenship or the country in which you legally reside now. Smile and cross your fingers.
 
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