Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I'm getting nowhere with the health care here in the uk and read my fathers country( Italy ) ranks far higher for it than here ( I suppose most western European nations do )

The bottom line is I want to go there with the same benefits as i get here for my disability ( Incapacity / DLA ) but on their health system as opposed to the NHS here. i.e. so Im not registered with any gp here

Although Im not working there ( Im still in the uk ) , I would consider it perhaps if I could get out this terrible situation Im in with my health - hence why Im interested in persuing their health system as opposed to this one.

Any advice or repsonses from any uk expats ( esp disabled ones ) would really be apprecaited.

thanks for listening .

helena
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,149 Posts
As I'm getting nowhere with the health care here in the uk and read my fathers country( Italy ) ranks far higher for it than here ( I suppose most western European nations do )

The bottom line is I want to go there with the same benefits as i get here for my disability ( Incapacity / DLA ) but on their health system as opposed to the NHS here. i.e. so Im not registered with any gp here

Although Im not working there ( Im still in the uk ) , I would consider it perhaps if I could get out this terrible situation Im in with my health - hence why Im interested in persuing their health system as opposed to this one.

Any advice or repsonses from any uk expats ( esp disabled ones ) would really be apprecaited.
Welcome to the forum!
Sorry I cannot give you detailed advice, but just a few points that come to mind:
If your intention of moving to Italy is for the explicit purpose of receiving medical care or treatment, that needs to be sanctioned by your consultant who needs to explain why you have to go to Italy and why it isn't available in UK under the health service (it can be due to a long waiting list). You need certificate E112. I don't know if this strictly applies in your case.
As for accessing the health and disability care in Italy, you first need to establish residence there. It isn't difficult for an EU citizen, but you need to register with your commune (local council) in Italy and with the health service there. If you aren't working but under state retirement age (currently 60 for women in UK), you can only get a maximum of 2 1/2 years of cover under Italian health system, and eligibility for that depends on your NI contribution record over the past few years. Being registered disabled in UK and unable to work may give you entitlement (you need to apply for certificate E106). You will need to investigate this by contacting DWP international pension centre in Newcastle.
If you are of pension age, apply for E121 which gives you full access to Italian health service on the same basis as locals.
More specific help and support for the disabled in Italy may depend on having made contributions, over a required period of time, to the Italian social security system. Your NI contributions or credit may count towards it, but you need to enquire perhaps at the Italian consulate.
Lastly, you may continue to be eligible to receive some of your disability benefits in Italy, but see Taking disability benefits to other European countries : Directgov - Disabled people

I hope someone can give you a detailed rundown of what kinds of services may be available to you in Italy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,944 Posts
As I'm getting nowhere with the health care here in the uk and read my fathers country( Italy )
If your father held Italian citizenship at the time of your birth you likely also hold Italian citizenship. You could file the required papers with the consulate and get an Italian passport. That would allow you fairly easy entry into the Italian health care system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,149 Posts
If your father held Italian citizenship at the time of your birth you likely also hold Italian citizenship. You could file the required papers with the consulate and get an Italian passport. That would allow you fairly easy entry into the Italian health care system.
I'd yield to your superior knowledge of the Italian health system, but generally speaking in Europe, nationality has little bearing on one's eligibility for public health care system in each country - much more relevant is one's residential status and whether one has contributed to the health care and social security systems through payroll deductions or direct payment. So a third-country national who is nonetheless a long-term resident of the country and has paid into the system has much greater access to services than someone holding an Italian passport through ancestry but has never lived, let alone contributed to the health and social care system, in Italy. I did say that for EU nationals, their contribution record in their own country may be taken into account, but this depends on circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,944 Posts
Medical care is a right in Italy. If you pay taxes you pay into the system. But even if you've never worked a day in your life and never paid taxes you're covered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,944 Posts
To add to what I wrote. Even if she wasn't resident in Italy then she'd get 90 days a year of health care. I think that's the rule for non resident Italians.

On the issue of residence she'll find that a non issue with an Italian passport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39,149 Posts
To add to what I wrote. Even if she wasn't resident in Italy then she'd get 90 days a year of health care. I think that's the rule for non resident Italians.

On the issue of residence she'll find that a non issue with an Italian passport.
Even for someone who has just arrived in Italy, other than for emergency treatment? So are you saying that someone with Italian citizenship through ancestry from US, just arriving in Italy for the first time in their life with their shiny new Italian passport, will be admitted into local hospital for open-heart surgery and all follow-up care without paying a penny, other than partial contribution everyone has to make?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If your father held Italian citizenship at the time of your birth you likely also hold Italian citizenship. You could file the required papers with the consulate and get an Italian passport. That would allow you fairly easy entry into the Italian health care system.
Im not exactly sure what the required papers are ( Im working on my italian - just started ) so I used babelfish to translate the passport section on Edinburgh Consulate website i.e. because its only in Italian

However, when i do that I can only see the forms ( which Im assuming are the application forms ) to renew passports , not make new applications.

I wrote to the consulate but they dont appear to understand what I mean i.e. they just redirected to a page regarding instructions in english - not the forms I need.

I dont suppose any one could take a look at this and point me in the right direction ? ( Sorry it wont let me post insert links :( )

Admitedly, Im not sure how accurate those transaltion sites like babelfish are either , so theres always that.

thanks again

h:confused2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,944 Posts
Are you currently registered with the consulate? You can't get a passport until that is done.

Okay. Was your father an Italian citizen at your birth?

If yes is he currently registered with the consulate? If so you'll need a birth certificate for the consulate.

You should ask the consulate about getting your citizenship recongized if it isn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Are you currently registered with the consulate? You can't get a passport until that is done.

Okay. Was your father an Italian citizen at your birth?

If yes is he currently registered with the consulate? If so you'll need a birth certificate for the consulate.

You should ask the consulate about getting your citizenship recongized if it isn't.
Im assuming he is based on the following " To our records, you are already an Italian citizen, since your birth was duly registered with the Italian Municipality of Cavargna, therefore you can apply for an Italian passport. In order to do so please consult our website "
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,944 Posts
Then you need to pay the fee. I think roughly 100 Euros for a new passport.

Provide the two photos in Italian format. EU standard I think.

Fill out the passport application.

How far are you from the nearest consulate? It only takes a few minutes to fill out the form. It's the usual stuff from what I remember. Height,age etc.

Non rush is two weeks unless it's changed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i still cant find the correct application forms on the edinburgh consulate site , Im assuming I have to use those ones ?

Or can i get them from somewhere else i.e. London ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,944 Posts
The form should be exactly the same from any consulate. But if you're going to drop off the form at the consulate why not just fill it out there? They should help you with it if you need it.

If you're looking for a form that states new application I doubt you'll find one. It's the same form no matter if it's your first one or your replacing an expired one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
As I'm getting nowhere with the health care here in the uk and read my fathers country( Italy ) ranks far higher for it than here ( I suppose most western European nations do )

The bottom line is I want to go there with the same benefits as i get here for my disability ( Incapacity / DLA ) but on their health system as opposed to the NHS here. i.e. so Im not registered with any gp here

Although Im not working there ( Im still in the uk ) , I would consider it perhaps if I could get out this terrible situation Im in with my health - hence why Im interested in persuing their health system as opposed to this one.

Any advice or repsonses from any uk expats ( esp disabled ones ) would really be apprecaited.

thanks for listening .

helena
I know that when I applied to become an Itlain resedent I had to demonstrate that I wouldnt be a burden on their health care and had to show them an insurance policy for health care. I spoke to a local resedent in a wheel chair and he explained that his fancy motorised chair came from the state - unlike here where you pay an arm and a leg for stuff knocked out my inmates...On the minus side although Italian conform to things like access for disabled people its a bit patchy. you get place with a disabled toilette that a disabled person would never be able to get to
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
As I'm getting nowhere with the health care here in the uk and read my fathers country( Italy ) ranks far higher for it than here ( I suppose most western European nations do )

The bottom line is I want to go there with the same benefits as i get here for my disability ( Incapacity / DLA ) but on their health system as opposed to the NHS here. i.e. so Im not registered with any gp here

Although Im not working there ( Im still in the uk ) , I would consider it perhaps if I could get out this terrible situation Im in with my health - hence why Im interested in persuing their health system as opposed to this one.

Any advice or repsonses from any uk expats ( esp disabled ones ) would really be apprecaited.

thanks for listening .

helena

Hi Helena,

A few things come to mind from your post that I think you should know.

1. To qualify for disability allowance in Italy you must have worked in Italy for at least 5 years in total, and 3 of those 5 years must have been in the past 5 years. Therefore, you would not qualify for disability allowance even if you are an Italian citizen. This is the short-term grant, the long-term grant version requires 15 years working in Italy.

2. To receive a disability pension you must have worked in Italy for at least 15 years.

3. Short-term Sickness benefits are also only available to people who are currently employed in Italy.

The above are the Italian parallels to Incapacity/DLA in the UK.

4. Medical benefits are not limited by employment requirements. Anyone who is resident in Italy may obtain medical service which includes: general and specialist care, hospitalization, prescribed medicines, dental care, the attendance of a midwife or doctor at childbirth, specified appliances, and spa treatment. However, patients may be required to pay co-payments of up to 50% for certain prescribed medications. As you've said you receive Incapacity Benefits, so you should apply for an E121 from the NHS to submit to the Italian authorities when you arrive.


As a British citizen, you have the right to travel, take up residence in and work in Italy. However, if you intend to go to Italy for a period longer than 3 months and not work, you will have to demonstrate that you have sufficient resources at your disposal so that you do not become "a burden on the state" (this includes demonstrating you have comprehensive sickness insurance in Italy). You obtain the status of "permanent resident" after living in Italy for five consecutive years. Obviously if you became an Italian citizen this would not apply.


As for the Italian passport, if you are registered already (as you stated) then you need only apply for a passport! I don't think you will be able to find the forms in English. You should go to the consulate in Edinburgh to seek assistance from the staff there in filling out the form, or find a friend who reads Italian.


I hope that helps! Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
So, my husband has an Italian passport (thanks to his dad), as well as a Canadian passport. We are moving to Italy in June for one year with our two kids (9 & 7).

Does this mean we ALL will automatically receive health coverage in Italy?? Can anyone help me with this please?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,944 Posts
Have you registered the marriage and kids with the consulate? The kids should also have an Italian passport. If you've been married for 3 plus years you can also apply.

Tell the consulate you're moving.
Bring them a copy of your shipping list . They'll give you a customs clearance form. One copy you give to your shipper.
They'll give you a change of residence form.

Once in Italy .

Get a codice fiscale number from the agenzie entrante.
Once you've decided on a place to live go to the commune and apply for residence. Bring the change of residence form from the consulate and your husband's ID.

Once they do the police visit you'll have residence. Go back to the commune and request the form to register for health care.

Take that form to the local health care office along with your codice fiscale number. Pick a doctor. In a week or two you'll get your plastic health /codice fiscale card.

All done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
WOW the Italian Consulate

Thank you soooo much NickZ. I did exactly what you said. Contacted our Italian Consulate. The kids are in the process of getting Italian passports. They said I can apply for citizenship too, but it takes 2 years.

In the meantime, we have extended health coverage and will follow your directions.

Again, thank you from this grateful Canadian.


Have you registered the marriage and kids with the consulate? The kids should also have an Italian passport. If you've been married for 3 plus years you can also apply.

Tell the consulate you're moving.
Bring them a copy of your shipping list . They'll give you a customs clearance form. One copy you give to your shipper.
They'll give you a change of residence form.

Once in Italy .

Get a codice fiscale number from the agenzie entrante.
Once you've decided on a place to live go to the commune and apply for residence. Bring the change of residence form from the consulate and your husband's ID.

Once they do the police visit you'll have residence. Go back to the commune and request the form to register for health care.

Take that form to the local health care office along with your codice fiscale number. Pick a doctor. In a week or two you'll get your plastic health /codice fiscale card.

All done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Request elaboration...

I'd yield to your superior knowledge of the Italian health system, but generally speaking in Europe, nationality has little bearing on one's eligibility for public health care system in each country - much more relevant is one's residential status and whether one has contributed to the health care and social security systems through payroll deductions or direct payment. So a third-country national who is nonetheless a long-term resident of the country and has paid into the system has much greater access to services than someone holding an Italian passport through ancestry but has never lived, let alone contributed to the health and social care system, in Italy. I did say that for EU nationals, their contribution record in their own country may be taken into account, but this depends on circumstances.
Hello Joppa,

Could I ask that you clarify an aspect I'm confused about? My wife and I (Canadian citizens/residents holding dual Italian citizenship/passports through her father's Italian citizenship/birth), following a brief conversation with someone formerly employed with an Italian consultate, had been left with the impression that, should we decide to establish residency in Italy, we would register with the local comune, establish residency and, without much delay or fuss, be fully eligible for membership in the national Italian healthcare system...despite never having resided (or paid taxes) there or in any other EU nation.

Do you feel we misinterpreted something or do you think the above interpretation is accurate?

Thanks for your time; I appreciate it.

Sincerely,
Robert
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
51,325 Posts
Hello Joppa,

Could I ask that you clarify an aspect I'm confused about? My wife and I (Canadian citizens/residents holding dual Italian citizenship/passports through her father's Italian citizenship/birth), following a brief conversation with someone formerly employed with an Italian consultate, had been left with the impression that, should we decide to establish residency in Italy, we would register with the local comune, establish residency and, without much delay or fuss, be fully eligible for membership in the national Italian healthcare system...despite never having resided (or paid taxes) there or in any other EU nation.

Do you feel we misinterpreted something or do you think the above interpretation is accurate?

Thanks for your time; I appreciate it.

Sincerely,
Robert
If you check around - both in the archives of this forum and doing some more general searches online - it appears that health care services in Italy are available to all Italian citizens and residents. (One presumes they mean legal residents only, but you never know...)

It is a little bit unusual within the EU, but hey, why not!? The Italian health care system is supposed to be very good.
Cheers,
Bev
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top