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hi

This is my first time on this forum.
Here's a little bit about my story (not gonna make it overwhelming) ...
I moved from Paris, France, to California two years ago. Originally I was supposed to stay for the summer with my boyfriend. Turned out we wanted to stay together so I made the decision to stay in California. We then got married.
Before you say anything, yes, I gave away everything I had for my husband. So here I am, in the U.S. Been here for two years now.
At the beginning I couldn't legally work but I started to look for jobs as soon as I got my work permit.
I got my first job here in a coffee shop. It got boring really fast. I quit this job because my husband was done with school in LA and we had to move back to OC.
This was a year ago. Since then I've been looking for jobs that are more in line with my studies. I went to film school in France for production and followed with a marketing bachelor.
Here's my problem though. I cannot seem to get any job here other than being a server in a coffe shop or a restaurant. I don't have anything against these jobs but I used to do that during summers when j was in school. Now I'm done with school and my goal in life was not to become a server.
I've also noticed that people treat me differently than the way I was treated back. France. It seems like they think I am "stupid" or I do not know as much as them.
I know English is no my first language, the culture and history are different. I didn't grew up here. So I do not know everything about living here. But this doesn't make me stupid nor a less valuable person.

It's been really hard for me because I am scared that I'm never gonna be taken seriously by people here because I cannot get a job that I would probably not have any problem getting in France.
And I feel frustrated, diminished and like people don't really know me.

I would love to have your opinions and maybe pieces of advice. Maybe I am doing something wrong. Maybe this happened to someone else.
Anything g would be a huge help and make my heart warmer.

Thank you
 

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At least half of the cohort of aspiring actors, directors, producers, makeup artists, set designers, and other individuals trying to make a living in California's entertainment industry spend time working in coffee shops, waiting tables, washing dishes, bartending, cleaning hotel rooms, and/or many other service jobs. And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. Most Americans greatly admire anybody working hard for a living.

That said, have you considered using your "disadvantage" as an advantage? French is an asset for some jobs, even in California. Start with that, searching for all jobs that list French language fluency as a plus or even as a requirement.
 

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You may want to take a look at the French section here of the forum. What you're describing is the exact inverse of the treatment that many anglophone expats get in France. (And yes, I'm originally from the US, married to a French national.)

The fact of the matter is that, people don't actually consider you to be stupid. You feel stupid, because of what you don't know or what you struggle with. You don't fit into the "normal" way things are done there and so you turn that feeling back on yourself. How do I know this? That's how it was for me at first here in France.

It can be awful in France to get a "foreign" degree recognized. So what do you do? You "idiot proof" your CV (called a resumé in the US) to include an explanation of how your French degree equates to an American one.

The other disadvantage you have is that you haven't worked in your field - certainly not in the US, and it sounds like you haven't done so yet back in France. There is a particular "job culture" in different countries, and yes, employers fear that you won't fit in properly because you'll be expecting the same job protections as you would have had in France. It's up to you to prove to them that you know what to expect - and initially, you do that through your resumé and cover letter, and eventually through how you approach the job interview.

It could be to your advantage to look into takes some sort of classes or continuing education courses in your field of work. Very often those sorts of classes will include a bit of "job counselling" or at the very least allow you to make valuable contacts (with your fellow students and/or the teachers). Networking is at least as important in the US for finding a job as is the degree title you have.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I do not know what you mean by OC.

Get your degree evaluated, work on your resume, get your hair done, have the appropriate wardrobe and start networking like a duck. Applying for jobs does especially on-line hardly ever works. Go to interview work shops, be present at chamber of comerce mixers, join Toastmasters, volunteer, join a church, ... Do diligent research about local companies and knock on doors. Use your accent to your advantage.
You think people look down on you. Why do,you think,they are doing that?
 

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I think also, here in the US, both of your chosen fields (film production and marketing) make heavy use of interns as a source of young & inexpensive labor and later as a tool to judge applicants for higher positions. It may be difficult to find a position in either field if you cannot point to any appropriate internships.

Unfortunately, whereas internships in Europe tend to pay at least a stipend plus expenses, many internships in the US pay very little or even nothing at all.

Search Production Internships on Internships.com

Internships in Film, Television, Video and Digital Media Production

INTERNSHIPS » Warner Bros. Careers

https://www.looksharp.com/s/film-internships/los-angeles-ca
 

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A few further thoughts on job hunting in an "alien" environment:

Try to find a seminar, classes or even just on-line information on how to use LinkedIn for a professional job hunt. It's "the" way to hook up with people nowadays and learning how to use it effectively will make a huge difference to the response you get.

Find out if there are particular "head hunters" in your field and try to get your resumé in with one of them - even if only to get his/her evaluation of your background and how your resumé is set up. (You shouldn't have to pay a recruiter. They get their fees from the hiring company, not from the candidates.)

Consider paying to have a professional resumé writer review and "fix" your resumé. The style of resumé used in the US is VERY different (and in some ways much, much pickier) than the French style CV. Some information you may be used to including is absolutely NOT to be included on a US resumé. (Because they think you are setting them up for a discrimination lawsuit.) And on a US resumé you are expected to do a certain amount of "bragging" about yourself - a job title is not considered sufficient to explain what you did. Start here: The National Resume Writers' Association - Home

Find whatever professional associations there are related to the jobs you are interested in. Join them and network, network, network. Don't be afraid to ask for help in finding a job in your field.

It's actually a bit more difficult for an anglophone, even with good to excellent French, to find a professional job in France - especially right now with unemployment here as high as it is. You may also have to be prepared to modify and adapt your career goals a bit to take advantage of your "foreign background." Job hunting in the US is based on the candidate showing a bit of creativity in their search - see if you can turn your language skills into a plus, or any existing ties you may have to the French film industry or to French professional associations. You aren't limited in the States to what you studied, but you have to convince an employer that you're able to do what you say you can do.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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WorkSource is a good, free resource for career counseling and job hunts. You get a card then take an assessment test on a computer at WS (takes at least an hour), get results. Then make an appointment with a counselor. Tell the scheduler the type of work you are looking for so you can be paired with the best counselor for your needs.

They have a lot of data on local companies, local economy, training resources. It is a national government program.

Google worksource california
You can also look in the government pages of your phone book (libraries have phone books if your home is cell or voip). Libraries can also tell you about your local Worksource office. Ask at the Reference desk.

I have 2 college degrees and found WS very helpful.

Good luck!
 
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