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Hi, my name is Stephen and we are planning to move to France this year, we want to live within an hour of Bordeaux. I am a hairdresser and want to work, is there a demand for this? Please let me know. Thanks
 

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Hi, my name is Stephen and we are planning to move to France this year, we want to live within an hour of Bordeaux. I am a hairdresser and want to work, is there a demand for this? Please let me know. Thanks
How well do you speak French? Even in an area populated by anglophone expats, most French employers are going to want someone who understands instructions in French. The other option is setting up your own shop or business. (But for that you will need the French to handle the paperwork.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How well do you speak French? Even in an area populated by anglophone expats, most French employers are going to want someone who understands instructions in French. The other option is setting up your own shop or business. (But for that you will need the French to handle the paperwork.)
Cheers,
Bev
Hi Thanks for info. My French is good, I was thinking i might start off mobile and working from home to see how things go. ste
 
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Hi Thanks for info. My French is good, I was thinking i might start off mobile and working from home to see how things go. ste
Bring a large bank account, you'll need it.

1. Most folk are happy with their current hairdresser, this is no reflection on your abilities, its just a trust thing with people.

2. The frogs are even more conservative with keeping their exisiting arrangements than the brits. You would be even more visible as a furriner than others, since you'd be offering a 1-to-1 service, and that alone is enough to leave you dead in teh water.

3. There's a recession going on here, despite what everyone says, so even the 'essential' extras get done less often. Hairdressing is a prime example - if you can wait 3 weeks instead of 2 to get your hair done thats a 50% saving over time.....

4. Do you know any brits who live out here? If so give them a ring and see if they'll give opinions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bring a large bank account, you'll need it.

1. Most folk are happy with their current hairdresser, this is no reflection on your abilities, its just a trust thing with people.

2. The frogs are even more conservative with keeping their exisiting arrangements than the brits. You would be even more visible as a furriner than others, since you'd be offering a 1-to-1 service, and that alone is enough to leave you dead in teh water.

3. There's a recession going on here, despite what everyone says, so even the 'essential' extras get done less often. Hairdressing is a prime example - if you can wait 3 weeks instead of 2 to get your hair done thats a 50% saving over time.....

4. Do you know any brits who live out here? If so give them a ring and see if they'll give opinions.
"Most folks are happy with their current hairdresser" can i ask how many people you have consulted to come to this conclusion. I am especially interested in how many "frogs" you have spoken to. I am also unsure what a furriner is. Thank you for your opinions.
 
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[<<<<" can i ask how many people you have consulted to come to this conclusion.>>>

None, but at age 57 I know that Ive only ever had 3-4 hairdressers since the age of 23. Lots of different hairstyles, some of which I regret having, but only 3-4 hairdressers.

Women are, I'd guess, even more careful than men. How many women have ever come up to you and said, 'I'm really really happy with my current style and cutter, I don't know you from Adam, let's give it a go''?

<<< I am especially interested in how many "frogs" you have spoken to. >>>

About hair? Admittedly not many. About frog mentality? - ah, a few more, spread out over 31 years.

<<< I am also unsure what a furriner is.>>>

Say it out loud and you'll get the point. Its what I am and you would be once you arrive.

<<< Thank you for your opinions. >>>

If you're not prepared to hear opinions that may run counter to your own then don't ask for any in teh first place.
 

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Hi Thanks for info. My French is good, I was thinking i might start off mobile and working from home to see how things go. ste
Mobile hairdressers seem to be pretty popular these days (though I'm located up in the Paris region). The trick seems to be having good contacts in order to get your name and number out there to a large enough audience that you can develop a loyal base.

As far as how easy or difficult it is to get French (or other) folks to change hairdressers, or try a new hairdresser, I think it depends on the area to some extent and to the specific services you offer. It can also help to get a foot in the door through a retirement home, hospital or other agency. The hairdresser in the little town near here used to work two or three afternoons a week in the local retirement home, cutting hair and being available for the residents there. It was a way to get to know folks in town.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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<<<Mobile hairdressers seem to be pretty popular these days (though I'm located up in the Paris region).>>>

I agree in principle Bev but maybe its popular due to little in teh way of travelling overheads. In teh sticks fuel costs and dead time travelling kills many a mobile one-man-band service.

<<As far as how easy or difficult it is to get French ............ being available for the residents there>>>

OK, but any established mobile service is likely to be run by a french person - so what chance has a foreigner got of coming in 'cold' and trying to replace them?

I note that you implied that the in-house days were in addition to their fixed salon - a newcomer would not have the luxury of a base like that to fall back on.

I believe that the only chance any ex-pat has got of earning any money in teh service sector in France is inside a large ex-pat community who are happy to use ex-pats themselves. But I abhor this approach because it is grossly unfair to the locals, and it creates resentment - which all ex-pats then have to suffer.

I also think that it is self-defeating - because a new entrant will be trying to get a foot in the door of a market which is either shrinking due to mass desertions back to blighty ( if you believe the tabloids) or at the very least is far more careful with its retirement Euros than hitherto. That foot will also be battling established ex-pat workers who probably have a loyal customer base.

'Resistance is futile'
 

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'Resistance is futile'
Hm, you've been watching old Star Trek reruns lately...

I admit it's not at all easy to set up a business (of any sort) as an "outsider" in most areas of France. But nothing ventured, nothing gained.

France is resistant to change in any form, but still it happens. Somebody had to push the envelope.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Hm, you've been watching old Star Trek reruns lately...

I admit it's not at all easy to set up a business (of any sort) as an "outsider" in most areas of France. But nothing ventured, nothing gained.

France is resistant to change in any form, but still it happens. Somebody had to push the envelope.
Cheers,
Bev
Thanks for giving some balance, i am also pleased i gave you a chance to have a good natter, i will only be doing this on a part time basis as it is a very secondary income

thanks ste
 
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