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I know is a long shot, but I heard due to "ius sanguinis" that people with german ancestry may be entitled to german citizenship? Anyone have any first hand knowledge of this!?

My greatgrand mother was born in Germany although her husband was dutch. They migrated to the USA and had my grandfather. I believe she was a German citizen when she had him and not sure if she ever became a US citizen or not. Would I possibly be entitled to citizenship?

Does it only count if both were german, or father, mother? Thanks.
 

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No go. As I understand it, one parent must have been a German citizen at the time of your birth. (Until recently the father needed to be German, but now it's either parent.)

I don't know a ton about it, but groups of Germans settled in various parts of Russia in the 19th century, then in the 1990s their descendants were offered the chance to return. More research required, but that's the gist of it, and likely the origins of the idea that a German ancestry would get you a passport (a condition that probably half the US population could meet). The Irish are quite liberal in this respect, but they stop at grandparents.
 

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I believe (but don't know for sure) that 1/4 "German-ness" is required, thus one of your grandparents. Ask at the embassy to get a verified answer, or engage a German immigration lawyer!
Keep in mind that when dealing with German buerocrats you need to prove everything in writing. Do you have (or can get) your anscestors' birth and citizenship certificates as well as emigration records?
Also, you'd probably have to give up your other citizenships when you become German.
 
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