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Very interesting, I wonder what this will mean for people who were waiting for Tier2 visas, or to make application.

On the families and partners proposed changes, I think the last line in this quote I'm pasting is interesting too-looks like they are definitely hoping to make an announcement by summer (I highlighted the part about family migration):

These changes are part of the government's radical overhaul of the immigration system. Firm action has already been taken on the student route, settlement and those coming here to work, in order to bring immigration levels back down to sustainable levels and make sure we receive only the brightest and best people. By summer the government will also have made changes to family migration routes.
 

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Very interesting, I wonder what this will mean for people who were waiting for Tier2 visas, or to make application.

On the families and partners proposed changes, I think the last line in this quote I'm pasting is interesting too-looks like they are definitely hoping to make an announcement by summer (I highlighted the part about family migration):
Well... we will know by summer then.

You don't have to be a rocket scientist to understand that something has to change with the immigration policies now in place. Too much strain and abuse within the system. It is the same pretty much back in the States.

I just hope they don't throw the baby out with the bath water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Very interesting, I wonder what this will mean for people who were waiting for Tier2 visas, or to make application.

On the families and partners proposed changes, I think the last line in this quote I'm pasting is interesting too-looks like they are definitely hoping to make an announcement by summer (I highlighted the part about family migration):
Yes I noticed that, and again, it could mean many things: that they'll announce changes that will come into force immediately, or changes to the law by summer that maybe (hopefully) will come into force some time down the line.

I read your post earlier on about your wanting to settle in the UK with your husband. In many ways one could make a strong argument that the quality of life in the UK is of a much higher standard than in the US. From this small bit of what you've experienced concerning these visa rule changes that are proposed: do you want to live in a country like this? Even though you may have had many good experiences here with your husband and no doubt with new friends, do you want to live in a place that can create such angst and a tenuous atmosphere, not only for you, but once you're settled, for those with the same hopes as you?

These are questions that I myself am going over in my head. I would be very happy to remain here, and my wife is very happy to be back. But to be honest since the government started in with their rhetoric which in various categories is being made into law, life in the UK seems more and more like an experience of diminishing returns. I'll be going to Toronto this spring and really give all this a think, particularly considering massively important elements like proximity to family. It's a pleasure to chat with you about this, and I wish you the very best of luck in your endeavours here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well... we will know by summer then.

You don't have to be a rocket scientist to understand that something has to change with the immigration policies now in place. Too much strain and abuse within the system. It is the same pretty much back in the States.

I just hope they don't throw the baby out with the bath water.
Maybe they'll toss out the entire washroom!
 

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@PedalMonkey-I agree, I don't think it's just the UK under this terrific strain. I lived in the Deep South before coming to the UK, and saw the incredible strain both legal and illegal immigration was putting put on already over-burdened social infrastructure. Since I've been in the UK I've seen much of the same sort of thing. I can well understand the UK wanting to impose very severe restrictions, I just hope they somehow can take care to remember there are probably far more immigrants who are sincere, honestly following all of the rules, and want nothing more than to be contributing members to British life.

@B-B-B (my favourite jewellers, btw:) )-indeed, very important considerations! There were so many reasons my husband and I decided to make our life in the UK, the two highest on the priority list being his two-time win against cancer, and the fact that he owns our house without a mortgage.

I, on the other hand, have no real health concerns, and while I did own my little place in GA, it wasn't much to speak of as little more than a glorified mountain cabin (lol, it had three rooms instead of one) and just wasn't big enough for the two of us.

I've been an expat before, and have gone through the very real anxieties that are part and parcel of being an expat. Nice thing is that this expat experience doesn't include the additional 'joys' of being in the middle of a civil war, as I was in Guatemala for two and a half years-now that was an adventure!

It does bother me that I got over here and suddenly learn that by the time I'm ready to apply for my ILR the bar will have been raised. Luckily my husband can meet that raised bar now that he has chosen to return to work after two+ years retirement, he's taking that rather well-mostly because he does not want to go to the US.

And I think that is the bottom line. We would go to the US of we needed to, but we do feel for us, in our situation and at our ages (mid-to late fifties), we have a better quality of life here in the UK.

To be frank and honest, if I had come to the UK from Canada, I really think we might be living in Canada now:)
 
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