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Hi
My daughter is about to start her last year of Bachillerato (ciencias de la salud), she's been here with me ever since she was 8, and she turned 17 this summer. She has been in spanish education ever since we moved here, and she speaks fluent spanish (her spanish is better than her english, although she hasnt lost much english because she's a book worm and reads about a book a week in english).
She wants to apply to go to uni in england, as she says she misses england sometimes, and there are better courses than here in Malaga university.
She would be looking to apply to either a foundation degree in art and design (to later on study photography) or to a degree in biochemistry or pharmacology.
The problem is, we have got in touch with UCAS, and they say that the spanish bachillerato doesn't give any tariff points! Most of the courses she's looking into ask for a minimum of 200 UCAS tariff points!
So has anybody have children who have gone to uni in england after a spanish education here? How do you get round the tariff points?
Also, is selectividad necessary to gain entry?

Thankyou

Lorraine
 

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Hi
My daughter is about to start her last year of Bachillerato (ciencias de la salud), she's been here with me ever since she was 8, and she turned 17 this summer. She has been in spanish education ever since we moved here, and she speaks fluent spanish (her spanish is better than her english, although she hasnt lost much english because she's a book worm and reads about a book a week in english).
She wants to apply to go to uni in england, as she says she misses england sometimes, and there are better courses than here in Malaga university.
She would be looking to apply to either a foundation degree in art and design (to later on study photography) or to a degree in biochemistry or pharmacology.
The problem is, we have got in touch with UCAS, and they say that the spanish bachillerato doesn't give any tariff points! Most of the courses she's looking into ask for a minimum of 200 UCAS tariff points!
So has anybody have children who have gone to uni in england after a spanish education here? How do you get round the tariff points?
Also, is selectividad necessary to gain entry?

Thankyou

Lorraine
hi & welcome

Spanish students go to uni in the UK every year - I think you should contact individual universities

certainly Oxford recognises bachillerato

International Qualifications - University of Oxford
 

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Hi
My daughter is about to start her last year of Bachillerato (ciencias de la salud), she's been here with me ever since she was 8, and she turned 17 this summer. She has been in spanish education ever since we moved here, and she speaks fluent spanish (her spanish is better than her english, although she hasnt lost much english because she's a book worm and reads about a book a week in english).
She wants to apply to go to uni in england, as she says she misses england sometimes, and there are better courses than here in Malaga university.
She would be looking to apply to either a foundation degree in art and design (to later on study photography) or to a degree in biochemistry or pharmacology.
The problem is, we have got in touch with UCAS, and they say that the spanish bachillerato doesn't give any tariff points! Most of the courses she's looking into ask for a minimum of 200 UCAS tariff points!
So has anybody have children who have gone to uni in england after a spanish education here? How do you get round the tariff points?
Also, is selectividad necessary to gain entry?

Thankyou

Lorraine
I don't know, but perhaps you have to get in touch with each individual university??
This course description for example says that international students have no entry requirements, which hardly seems fair, but that's what it says...
http://www.whatuni.com/degrees/courses/Foundation-Degree-details/Foundation-Degree-in-Art-and-Design-Professional-Practice-course-details/369358/7
 

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You would be advised to contact NARIC UK NARIC - Home. It's a UK's national agency responsible for providing qualification information to individuals from outside of the UK who wish to come to the UK to work, study or train. They will be able to provide your daughter with a statement about the comparative level of her qualification to the UK's qualification frameworks. This statement is recognised by universities, colleges and employers throughout the UK.
 

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Having just had a look through the UCAS website, the european baccalaureate is listed under 'other qualifications' on each course profile...
Hope this helps
 

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Hi Lorraine, Both our children went though the Spanish school system from a very early age right up to instutito which neither of them finished, I could see 8 years ago there was very little future on the Costa del Sol for young people so we decided to send them away for further education, our daughter to a dance college in the UK, and our son to a hospitality school in Switzerland.
It's ironic that after 3 years in Switzerland (3 by 6 months study, 3 by 6 months internship) our son was accepted to Manchester Metro. Uni for his degree, (one year)and yet he had never passed any exams!, never even finished instutito his 18 months study! was accepted as an HND, being an overseas student we had to pay (after a means test), I had the distinct impression the uni was only interested in the money, overseas students being the gravy train for them now.
I was also advised when we were looking for further education for our kids to consider another country, Holland being recommended, courses cheaper then the UK, and in English, a nice lifestyle with a good mix of international students.
What I'm trying to say, don't give up, there are ways round the system and other countries with courses in English, your daughter could end up being trilingual!. Regards Rob
 

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Hmmm. That's interesting!
With imminent introduction of £9000 a year tuition fees by most UK unis from 2012-13, applicants are actively seeking cheaper alternatives abroad, and the Sunday Times reported that Maastricht Uni is proving popular for lower fees and classes in English.
 

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And this was in the DT a few days ago, about studying abroad, but some of the fees stated should perhaps be taken with a pinch of salt!.
Top 10 European university alternatives for UK students - Telegraph
Certainly worth considering, although there are a few things to bear in mind:
Copenhagen doesn't offer Bachelor degrees in English, only Masters and Doctoral.
To study at Bern uni, you need a proficiency in German and, at Lausanne, the courses are taught in French...

So, for those students with bilingual or trilingual skills, they certainly would be viable alternatives to UK universities
 

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Hi
My daughter is about to start her last year of Bachillerato (ciencias de la salud), she's been here with me ever since she was 8, and she turned 17 this summer. She has been in spanish education ever since we moved here, and she speaks fluent spanish (her spanish is better than her english, although she hasnt lost much english because she's a book worm and reads about a book a week in english).
She wants to apply to go to uni in england, as she says she misses england sometimes, and there are better courses than here in Malaga university.
She would be looking to apply to either a foundation degree in art and design (to later on study photography) or to a degree in biochemistry or pharmacology.
The problem is, we have got in touch with UCAS, and they say that the spanish bachillerato doesn't give any tariff points! Most of the courses she's looking into ask for a minimum of 200 UCAS tariff points!
So has anybody have children who have gone to uni in england after a spanish education here? How do you get round the tariff points?
Also, is selectividad necessary to gain entry?

Thankyou

Lorraine

Hello Lorraine.
I dont have children university age, but I happen to know personal cases of students that went to UK for their bachelors degree and that were admitted, although yes, selectividad was a requirement, along with some other school records.
 

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The daughter of a friend of mine has a place at Manchester to read wildlife biology next month, which was conditional on her spanish bacc reults, but as far as I know she didn't need to do any other tests apart from an english language test (which of course she left to the last minute as she didn't want to jinx it! But passed with 80%!) She also had a place offered at Glasgow, so maybe it is down to the individual unis. She's been at spanish school since she was 6 but is very interested in wildlife research and apparently the UK is the best place for her to go.
 

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The daughter of a friend of mine has a place at Manchester to read wildlife biology next month, which was conditional on her spanish bacc reults, but as far as I know she didn't need to do any other tests apart from an english language test (which of course she left to the last minute as she didn't want to jinx it! But passed with 80%!) She also had a place offered at Glasgow, so maybe it is down to the individual unis. She's been at spanish school since she was 6 but is very interested in wildlife research and apparently the UK is the best place for her to go.
Places offered to EU applicants are outside the funded allocations so unis can be more relaxed about accepting them. Supposing the funded allocations for a course are 100, they can still accept non-UK EEA and overseas (international) students in excess without being penalised for over-recruitment, when future funding is reduced. So the latter is a lucrative source of extra income and they particularly welcome them.
 

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Places offered to EU applicants are outside the funded allocations so unis can be more relaxed about accepting them. Supposing the funded allocations for a course are 100, they can still accept non-UK EEA and overseas (international) students in excess without being penalised for over-recruitment, when future funding is reduced. So the latter is a lucrative source of extra income and they particularly welcome them.
I wonder how that works with UK citizens who have been educated abroad with a foreign qualification

where do they fit?

they are entitled to be treated as UKC with the same grants and so on, afaik unless it has changed recently.................yet they are essentially 'foreign' as far as their qualifications are concerned
 

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I wonder how that works with UK citizens who have been educated abroad with a foreign qualification

where do they fit?

they are entitled to be treated as UKC with the same grants and so on, afaik unless it has changed recently.................yet they are essentially 'foreign' as far as their qualifications are concerned
Hmm, interesting question!
Those British citizens deemed to be UK resident (because they or their parents have been exercising treaty rights in EEA) are home students so I assume they come within the funded allocations, regardless of qualifications produced. But if they are EEA applicants with no UK connection, they are clearly outside the allocations.
 

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Hmm, interesting question!
Those British citizens deemed to be UK resident (because they or their parents have been exercising treaty rights in EEA) are home students so I assume they come within the funded allocations, regardless of qualifications produced. But if they are EEA applicants with no UK connection, they are clearly outside the allocations.
exactly!!


maybe I'll find out in 3 years when my dd goes to uni.....she at the moment is determined to go in the US - but she might equally decide to stay in Spain or go to the UK, it just depends on where the best course is at the time for what she decides to do
 

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they are entitled to be treated as UKC with the same grants and so on, afaik unless it has changed recently.................yet they are essentially 'foreign' as far as their qualifications are concerned
Sounds like the best of both worlds so there's bound to be some catch none of us have thought of! Plus if they go to Uni in-state here they get a great reduction in fees too. So it's Valencia or Scotland for my two :p
 
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My post may be a bit late or irrelevant, but a friend of mine from Portugal managed to get an offer from a uni somewhere around London, so I don't see why your daughter couldn't manage.

I just hope she doesn't make the same mistake as my friend and drop out after a year because she couldn't fit in!
 

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Sounds like the best of both worlds so there's bound to be some catch none of us have thought of! Plus if they go to Uni in-state here they get a great reduction in fees too. So it's Valencia or Scotland for my two :p
Why's that fourgotospain?

Because they're not Spanish??

So they'd be foreign students where ever they went?
 

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Why's that fourgotospain?

Because they're not Spanish??

So they'd be foreign students where ever they went?
at a guess I'd say it's because it's cheaper in both Scotland & Spain no matter where you're from!!

although perhaps that isn't quite true :confused2:

Edinburgh University charges English students £36,000 for a degree - Telegraph

if they are Scottish I believe uni in Scotland is free?

European student numbers soar at Scotland's free universities | Education | guardian.co.uk
 
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