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A lot of older Spanish pisos will use bottled gas for heating the water and for cooking (and quite a lot of them won't have an oven). The home owners prefer it that way because using gas is a lot cheaper than electricity.

However, unless they are in an area where mains gas is available, most newer built pisos will be all-electric. Gas will be more common in areas where it gets cold in winter as properties there will be more likely to have central heating with radiators.

That map seems to be a bit out of date, by the way. I went to view a piso a couple of months ago here in Vélez-Malaga which had gas natural (only used for heating the water, though). The town is about 35km East of Malaga and no gas pipelines are shown on the map for that area.
 

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It is very easy to disconnect the mains gas to any apartment that you may be interested in anyway.

All supply pipes run uncovered and can be removed and blanked off easily.

The problem may be if you want to ensure that no apartments in the building have gas, because, of course you cannot control what your neighbours do.

The only way to ensure this is to live away from the mains supply, but even then you will find that neighbours will probably used bottled gas as the others have stated.

Is your criteria specifically related to mains gas, or do you want to avoid bottled gas also? (I think the latter may prove to be difficult to be honest).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It is very easy to disconnect the mains gas to any apartment that you may be interested in anyway.

All supply pipes run uncovered and can be removed and blanked off easily.

The problem may be if you want to ensure that no apartments in the building have gas, because, of course you cannot control what your neighbours do.

The only way to ensure this is to live away from the mains supply, but even then you will find that neighbours will probably used bottled gas as the others have stated.

Is your criteria specifically related to mains gas, or do you want to avoid bottled gas also? (I think the latter may prove to be difficult to be honest).

my concern is indeed what neighbours do, if someone forget to turn it off for example.

do you think bottled gas would be just as bad as mains gas in case of an explosion? I was hoping the amount of gas inside a bombola would be not able to destroy a whole piso but maybe I am wrong.

Thank you
 

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my concern is indeed what neighbours do, if someone forget to turn it off for example.

do you think bottled gas would be just as bad as mains gas in case of an explosion? I was hoping the amount of gas inside a bombola would be not able to destroy a whole piso but maybe I am wrong.

Thank you
Way, way back in the late 60s I lived in an apartment in Spain when a neighbour's gas bottle exploded - it only damaged the neighbour's apartment (although it gave us one hell of a fright!).
 

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There's a report here of a case where TWO bombonas exploded in an apartment in Barcelona, and no structural damage was caused to the apartment building.

Un herido grave al explotar dos bombonas de gas en un piso de L'Hospitalet

Last year, in the town where I live there was a gas bottle explosion in the kitchen of a restaurant which was on the ground floor of an apartment block, with others next door on either side. Apart from some broken windows to the nearest ones, there was no damage to neighbouring properties.
 

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Much of northern europe is on mains gas. UK even has/had [?] its own gas fields. Before 'natural' gas from the North Sea or wherever, gas was manufactured - 'town gas'. If you've seen cricket on TV from The Oval, London, you will have seen the enormous gas holder looming over the ground.

The potential for explosions amongst the many hundreds of thousands of properties, domestic and commercial, connected to gas is therefore many times greater than in Spain but they are vanishingly rare. In my experience, news of a gas explosion is more likely to involve a defective gas bottle rig in Spain than any other cause. This is because set-ups using bottled gas might well be DIY.

There is mains gas in my building in central Valencia city. When I saw the supply pipe running up the lightwell, right past the absolutely ideal spot in the kitchen for a gas water heater, it was one of the deal-makers for my purchase. I now have a gas hob and on-demand instant hot water from a gas supply installed to gas company standands.

Many new apartment buildings in the cities have gas as the energy source because combi boilers, giving on-demand hot water and running central heating radiators, are a cost-effective way to supply these services, far more so than electricity. However, mains gas is far from widespread in Spain and bottled gas is very common - and cheap, as has been noted by others
 

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With the bombonas I suspect carbon monoxide poisoning is more of a threat than explosions. But still rare enough to make the TV news when it happens. Statistically you're much more likely to die in a traffic accident, but that doesn't mean you would never leave the house.
 

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With the bombonas I suspect carbon monoxide poisoning is more of a threat than explosions. But still rare enough to make the TV news when it happens. Statistically you're much more likely to die in a traffic accident, but that doesn't mean you would never leave the house.
I suspect that's the case with all gas connections and appliances. Certainly is here and is why I have been investigating getting the gas in my apartment disconnected and going all electric - although I have to admit it's an issue I tend to be a bit obsessed with.
 
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