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Discussion Starter #1
My apartment has a gas bottle under the kitchen sink and I'm thinking of buying another one.

I asked a couple of people today if they have two bottles or one and they had a problem with the concept. They said that they have one and when it's empty the company exchanges it for another one.

I asked what happens for example if they are in the middle of cooking and suddenly there's no gas. They said the company brings an exchange one.

They have mini ones here and that's what I think I'll buy as it probably has enough gas in it for at least a couple of weeks.

Maybe I need to change my concept of time? ;-)

Ideas? Suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A local gave me a tip which will maybe save me buying and extra bottle, about 20 euros.

He said that when the gas starts to get low or even appears to run out, to lay the bottle on its side after which you'll get some more time out of it.
 

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It's not how many Paramonte might have but what your apartment agreement and insurance allow, their might for example be a safe store where you can keep a spare, hoses are dated check yours are still valid
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's not how many Paramonte might have but what your apartment agreement and insurance allow, their might for example be a safe store where you can keep a spare, hoses are dated check yours are still valid
Thanks, I will ask the owner and have the hoses checked.

From a friend of mine ..

As its boiling point is below room temperature, LPG will evaporate quickly at normal temperatures and pressures and is usually supplied in pressurised steel vessels. They are typically filled to between 80% and 85% of their capacity to allow for thermal expansion of the contained liquid. The ratio between the volumes of the vaporized gas and the liquefied gas varies depending on composition, pressure, and temperature, but is typically around 250:1. The pressure at which LPG becomes liquid, called its vapour pressure, likewise varies depending on composition and temperature; for example, it is approximately 220 kilopascals (32 psi) for pure butane at 20 °C (68 °F), and approximately 2.2 megapascals (320 psi) for pure propane at 55 °C (131 °F). LPG is heavier than air, unlike natural gas, and thus will flow along floors and tend to settle in low spots, such as basements. There are two main dangers from this. The first is a possible explosion if the mixture of LPG and air is within the explosive limits and there is an ignition source. The second is suffocation due to LPG displacing air, causing a decrease in oxygen concentration. In addition, an odorant is mixed with LPG used for fuel purposes so that leaks can be detected more easily.
 
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