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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I studied in Canada as a young adult, lived there for 3 years from 1996 - 1999, and it has always been my dream to move back there and live permanently, and become Canadian.

I applied in 2003 (after I had a few years of work experience!) and in 2006, I reached the interview stage of my immigration application. At the time I was a Marketing Manager and my skills were still deemed desirable.

However, in that same year I had started a new relationship with my then-boyfriend-now-husband who at the time was not ready to leave the UK. So, instead I cancelled my application altogether (a decision I painfully regret to this day) and decided to stay with him in London.

8 years, marriage and 2 kids later, I am 37 years old, living in Australia and still pining for Canada...it also didn't help that I went on holiday there a couple of time in the past 8 years which reinforced my love for the country.

I understand immigration there is now very restricted and my age is no longer helpful! I am willing to retrain in a relevant field if necessary, if I know for sure that it will help with my application. I know they need physiotherapists, Occupational therapists and nurses.

As I am in Australia, and it's expensive (specially since I'm British and would be paying international student fees), I would be looking into something I can do over the next 2 years (ie Physio assistant, OT assistant, or a diploma in nursing)... just to get the ball rolling.

My question is, would that ( doing 'less than a Bachelor's degree') at all count towards eligibility to immigrate? Reason I ask is because I can start doing a Certificate/Diploma-type study (a 2-year course - it's more affordable that way!), gain some work experience whilst simultaneously applying for Canadian immigration. In 3-4 years time, when I *hopefully* get called for my interview, I can at least be a qualified OT assistant or Physiotherapist assistant with 1-2 years of work experience...

Provided that my training and work experience as an assistant to a required field can count towards overall credit, I can then complete my degree in Canada and at least be a physiotherapist trained under the Canadian educational system. I hope I'm making sense. I'm just trying to find a way to be smart about time... I'd like to essentially move there in 4 years - before I'm way WAY past the desirable age to immigrate!

I want to move to Canada and want to find the best, most time effective, and right way to make it happen.

Hope I'm not being unrealistic, but I don't want to give up on this dream... Any suggestions would really help!! THANKS!
 

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Hi,
I studied in Canada as a young adult, lived there for 3 years from 1996 - 1999, and it has always been my dream to move back there and live permanently, and become Canadian.

I applied in 2003 (after I had a few years of work experience!) and in 2006, I reached the interview stage of my immigration application. At the time I was a Marketing Manager and my skills were still deemed desirable.

However, in that same year I had started a new relationship with my then-boyfriend-now-husband who at the time was not ready to leave the UK. So, instead I cancelled my application altogether (a decision I painfully regret to this day) and decided to stay with him in London.

8 years, marriage and 2 kids later, I am 37 years old, living in Australia and still pining for Canada...it also didn't help that I went on holiday there a couple of time in the past 8 years which reinforced my love for the country.

I understand immigration there is now very restricted and my age is no longer helpful! I am willing to retrain in a relevant field if necessary, if I know for sure that it will help with my application. I know they need physiotherapists, Occupational therapists and nurses.

As I am in Australia, and it's expensive (specially since I'm British and would be paying international student fees), I would be looking into something I can do over the next 2 years (ie Physio assistant, OT assistant, or a diploma in nursing)... just to get the ball rolling.

My question is, would that ( doing 'less than a Bachelor's degree') at all count towards eligibility to immigrate? Reason I ask is because I can start doing a Certificate/Diploma-type study (a 2-year course - it's more affordable that way!), gain some work experience whilst simultaneously applying for Canadian immigration. In 3-4 years time, when I *hopefully* get called for my interview, I can at least be a qualified OT assistant or Physiotherapist assistant with 1-2 years of work experience...

Provided that my training and work experience as an assistant to a required field can count towards overall credit, I can then complete my degree in Canada and at least be a physiotherapist trained under the Canadian educational system. I hope I'm making sense. I'm just trying to find a way to be smart about time... I'd like to essentially move there in 4 years - before I'm way WAY past the desirable age to immigrate!

I want to move to Canada and want to find the best, most time effective, and right way to make it happen.

Hope I'm not being unrealistic, but I don't want to give up on this dream... Any suggestions would really help!! THANKS!
What is your current profession? What does your husband do for a living?

You aren't being unrealistic, but by the time you achieve your goals, Canada would had changed their immigration rules 4 times.

Animo
(Cheers)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply and questions,

After more than 5 years off work (due to committing my time to my children), I've only just started a new job. I'm a coordinator (so some clerical/secretarial work combined with event management, juggling schedules, with some PR and sales). They are not wanted skills in Canada, and I know that... this is why I'm looking to retrain. I understand Canada will have changed their rules by the time I get there, but I guess I'd like to see what my options are.

My husband is a business analyst - he works in the gas and power regeneration industry... and his field is currently on the list (I think!) of desired skills. He has an MBA too.

However, because of personal reasons, I would prefer the application to be in my name. If the application is better off in his, then I will consider that as a last resort. For reasons I don't want to go into on this forum, it's better if the application is in my name.

Gracias. Lo agradezco mucho ;-)
 

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Hi,
Thanks for your reply and questions,

After more than 5 years off work (due to committing my time to my children), I've only just started a new job. I'm a coordinator (so some clerical/secretarial work combined with event management, juggling schedules, with some PR and sales). They are not wanted skills in Canada, and I know that... this is why I'm looking to retrain. I understand Canada will have changed their rules by the time I get there, but I guess I'd like to see what my options are.

My husband is a business analyst - he works in the gas and power regeneration industry... and his field is currently on the list (I think!) of desired skills. He has an MBA too.

However, because of personal reasons, I would prefer the application to be in my name. If the application is better off in his, then I will consider that as a last resort. For reasons I don't want to go into on this forum, it's better if the application is in my name.

Gracias. Lo agradezco mucho ;-)
I truly respect the order of your preferences, however, the last one on your list will get y'all in Canada (Alberta - Saskatchewan) in a heart beat.

In regards of your current line of work, you will be surprised in how many Bilingual Executive Assistants I've met that have been sponsored by their employers. Their roles are: scheduling, meeting arrangements, organize PR activities, assist other departments, etc.

You will only have to apply for jobs and hope that - if successful, your potential employer sponsors you.

Suerte, un super abrazo :cool:

Animo
(Cheers)
 

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Thanks for your reply and questions,

After more than 5 years off work (due to committing my time to my children), I've only just started a new job. I'm a coordinator (so some clerical/secretarial work combined with event management, juggling schedules, with some PR and sales). They are not wanted skills in Canada, and I know that...

If you mean that those skills are not on the list for immigration, that may be true but there are plenty of jobs in PR/Communications/Marketing here in Canada (I work in PR/Communications myself).
 
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