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Hello everyone, I had some questions about going to university in France. What kinds of things do colleges look at when you apply? I'm wondering if things like high school grades are things that they look at when you apply. Thanks.
 

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Most courses in Fr universities are in French and therefore they demand a reasonable level of competence in the language. To my knowledge some universities demand a DELF or DALF diploma (Fr language exams for foreigners) before you can start the course, but you can secure the place without it.

Try the individual university sites ? If you did not know already the French are very administratively minded. Your application (dossier) must contain all the pieces of paper before you can get into the admission system.

I've sat on interview boards for ESCs ( not universities) and I've been surprised that otherwise good candidates were barred from evaluation simply because a piece of paper was missing from their dossier. Therefore look at the details VERY carefully and follow them to the letter. If you cannot provide something that is required then make a "dummy" copy saying perhaps that the document does not exist in the US or state the date when it will be available.

I've taught US students who were in an MBA class in France. They all said that living and learning in a different country / culture etc was a very broadening and welcome experience.


Good luck....DejW

Hello everyone, I had some questions about going to university in France. What kinds of things do colleges look at when you apply? I'm wondering if things like high school grades are things that they look at when you apply. Thanks.
 

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Start with the Campus France website (I gave you the link on my reply to another post). Just be aware that French universities work very differently than US ones do. The first couple of years are mostly huge lecture classes, where you have to get to class early to get a seat. There is little or no direct contact with your instructors and it seems to be something of a self-sorting system designed to inspire the less-motivated students to drop out.

There are also no "general requirements" courses. Once you hit university, you're in a specific program (equivalent to your "major" in a US university) without "electives" or "core" side courses. If you decide to change "majors" it means starting over again from square one.

Coming from the US, most folks find it better to get their undergrad degree in the US and then go to France for graduate work in a specific subject.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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