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I would like to speak with someone who is currently living in the States and receiving retirement benefits from France. My husband is in the process of applying for his retirement benefits in France...as he turns 60 this year. Apparently there is an Agreement between US and France but he has several questions. If there is someone out there who is a French National receiving french retirement in the US could you please get in touch?
 

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Not sure we have many French retirees living in the US, but I'll try to help if I can. Basically, your husband should receive his French pension in the US. It will be taxed in the US under US tax laws, as France does not tax its citizens living overseas.

And, if your husband is also eligible for US social security, that may be reduced somewhat under the Windfall Elimination Provision because he has another government pension.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Retiree in US..question about drawing French retirement benefits

Hello,
My mom is a French citizen living in the US, and she is trying to figure out how to apply for retirement benefits in France. Does anyone know what is the best way to do this, and how long does it take. I was told she should send a letter to Baltimore directly. Anybody has gone through this process?
 

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Hello,
My mom is a French citizen living in the US, and she is trying to figure out how to apply for retirement benefits in France. Does anyone know what is the best way to do this, and how long does it take. I was told she should send a letter to Baltimore directly. Anybody has gone through this process?
Why Baltimore?

If your mother is entitled to French retirement benefits, she should probably contact the French consulate for information about how to file her claim.

It depends on how long she worked in France and paid her cotisations, plus her age, and there may be some credit for time she worked in the US or elsewhere. These days, when someone turns 56 or 58 (it keeps changing), there is normally an assessment done to determine the approximate amount of pension you're due and to make sure the records concerning your work experience are up to date. The Consulate should be able to put your mother in contact with the proper office in France to get an evaluation done.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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