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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm aware that by obtaining a Masters degree in France, and planning to relocate, obtain citizenship, and live in France in future can cut the time needed for my citizenship down to 2 years instead of 5.

I am wondering if this Masters degree, the InternationalVintage Master - Erasmus Mundus
vintagemaster dot com

is valid for the 2 year thing. I want to get a Masters in winemaking, but I want to make sure that that Masters will help me on the two year requirement.

If anyone can help me this, especially with an official link, I would be very thankful!


Brian
 

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I wouldn't bet the farm on that one entitling you to reduced time-in-country for taking French nationality. If in doubt, go to the Campus France website CampusFrance - Education en France - Study in France - Estudiar en Francia - Etudier en France - Study abroad in France - Centre pour les Etudes En France - CEF. Coming from the US, you have to go through Campus France for your visa (or so I am told) - and Campus France is the link for foreign students into the French higher education system.

What's the big hurry, anyhow? As long as you're legally in France, there is very little difference whether you're an "étranger" or a French national. The only really significant difference is that, as a French national, you can vote (and take it from me, that's not that much of a much here).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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That particular Masters is mentioned on the Campus France site, for what it's worth.
Then maybe it does fall under the qualifications for the shortened residence period. The one caveat, though, is that you do have to find a job at the end of the masters program - in order to allow you to stay on in France. IIRC, most masters programs in France last only one to one and a half years.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Brian, I'm a little confused. You are American, living in Australia, wanting to relocate to France? Is that right? Do you have dual US / Aus citizenship? Am I missing something or could you not apply for a visa/passport for any European country you may have any kind of ancestral connection with? If you don't have ancestral but do have Aus citizenship, I understood that Aus and UK have some kind of similar working type visa options.

Lin
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Brian, I'm a little confused. You are American, living in Australia, wanting to relocate to France? Is that right? Do you have dual US / Aus citizenship? Am I missing something or could you not apply for a visa/passport for any European country you may have any kind of ancestral connection with? If you don't have ancestral but do have Aus citizenship, I understood that Aus and UK have some kind of similar working type visa options.

Lin

I am American. I went to France for a year on a teaching visa, then I came back to the States. My fiancée is Australian, and upon moving from France back to the States, I really did not want to live there anymore, so we decided to move to Australia since getting a visa in France was difficult for both of us. We are now living in Sydney, but we talk everyday about HOW we are going to get back to France. At this point it really doesn't matter to us what we do there for the first several years, we are just saving up money, working, and researching our best methods of how to return.

I have applied for permanent residency in Aus, and I might apply for citizenship, (always a good idea when you spouse is from there,) and using that we might be able to do a working holiday in France, yes, but I was looking for something a little more permanent.

Edit: Good job on guessing my exact situation too btw :)
 

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My suggestion is continue with the perm. residence and citizenship process in Aus, once you have those, you would be on a much stronger base. You mentioned you are going to or are learning French? I would also check the preferred Masters list again also there must be another type of desired visa applicant credential list (I am sure someone on the site can point you to that) and see if it would be possible to obtain a visa that way. Does anyone know if it would be easier to get a visa to another EU country, for example Spain? I am assuming having an EU country visa would entitle you to live and work in France but I could be wrong.

Lin

;)
 

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My suggestion is continue with the perm. residence and citizenship process in Aus, once you have those, you would be on a much stronger base. You mentioned you are going to or are learning French? I would also check the preferred Masters list again also there must be another type of desired visa applicant credential list (I am sure someone on the site can point you to that) and see if it would be possible to obtain a visa that way. Does anyone know if it would be easier to get a visa to another EU country, for example Spain? I am assuming having an EU country visa would entitle you to live and work in France but I could be wrong.

Lin

;)
The one caveat about this whole project is that, from reports we've had on the forum, the French consulate in Australia can be pretty nitpicky about the rules and procedures for obtaining a visa. Check their website very carefully for their procedures, because they aren't too good about answering individual questions from all reports.

There isn't really a preferred Masters list. That two years of "higher education" study in France is a reduction of the residence time required to take French nationality - but you have to have been legally (i.e. with proper visa) in France in the first place and that's the tough hurdle to get over. You still have to meet all the other requirements of taking French nationality - it's not just a matter of sitting through two years of university level training in France.

Having a visa for a different EU country does NOT give you the right to live and work in France. It only gives you the right to visit France for up to 90 days at a time while residing in another European country.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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