Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I am very interested in attending music school in France. I've been looking at Le Conservatoire de Paris as a starting point in my research. I know that the public universities make Americans take one year of university in the U.S. first before attending their universities. Does this apply to conservatories as well, or are they mostly audition-based? Any insight would be much appreciated! Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
I don't mean this harshly, but you're going to need to be more proactive about finding your own information if you're serious about pursuing higher education in France. You've received some good general information about studying in France in your other threads and at a certain moment it's up to you to go to the school's website and figure out their requirements. And if they don't have information for foreign students on their site, then you'll need to call via Skype or phone (I found Skype calls to be cheaper) to ask... And even then be prepared to fight for answers. One aspect of French culture that is doubly (triply, even) true in French higher ed is that your problem is not someone else's problem, so why should they inconvenience themselves to help you get the info you need? It's a long way from the American response of "Hm, I'm not sure, but I'll see what I can do.". So yes, if you're serious about studying in France, it's time to take more proactive steps like learning about the requirements for the programs that interest you. We will be happy to give you more info about things we can help with, like general thoughts on higher ed in France, student living, and student visas.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,411 Posts
The Convervatoire de Paris has a pretty extensive website, and you can get the information in English. Front and center (well, almost) is information on the auditions, which appear to be done on a strict schedule, depending on your discipline.

There is a section on International Relations, though this deals with both concert exchanges and international students. They seem to be focused primarily on Erasmus foreign students, however. Erasmus is an inter-European student exchange program, and I see that international applications are supposed to be submitted through an Erasmus coordinator. You may want to contact the person listed on that page for information about non-EU foreign students.
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,909 Posts
The two previous posts are both quite right and useful to you.

Dreaming is quite right, you need to prepare your "dossier" in accordance with the requirements and follow it through. If you want to study in France you should be prepared for a hard slog of language learning, and learning to stand on your own two feet. France is not "customer friendly".

Bev is right about Erasmus. I've taught business school students on Erasmus exchanges and it seems to work very well. The wonderful thing is that students find themselves working, living and eating (and loving!) with a range of nationalities and cultures. They learn so much! My only regret is that Erasmus did not exist when I was a student. I think that you need to already studying in an academic institution before you can go on exchange. From my experience students on Erasmus exchanges go their second or third year and the diploma / certificate they receive is from their "home" university not from where they visit for a year.

DejW
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,411 Posts
Just a note - as an American, Erasmus is kind of irrelevant to the OP. That was why I mentioned my "concern" that the only information about international students on the school's website mentions Erasmus.
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,909 Posts
Oh dear, oh dear

As usual, Bev, you are correct. Erasmus is Europe wide, but not worldwide. Where I was teaching there were Erasmus students, and students from all over the world on various exchange programmes. (some programmes were, I think, strictly between 2 teaching institutions, or a small group of them). As a prof I was well aware of having "exchange students" in my class, but I did not know the details.

I apologise if I have given wrong or misleading information.

DejW


Just a note - as an American, Erasmus is kind of irrelevant to the OP. That was why I mentioned my "concern" that the only information about international students on the school's website mentions Erasmus.
Cheers,
Bev
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top