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Hi,
I am a canadian engineer and I was offered to work for a french company in france for a 12 months period. They said I will have to pay social charges such pension and others!!! and it is a significant amount.

are these amounts reimbursable? if not, how can I minimize it?

Thank you for your help
 

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You want to move and work in another country but not pay any taxes? I though only the English did this, not a law abiding Canadian.

Do you own research and you will find that it is simple process. Your consultant is a first point of searching - not a forum.
 

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Hi,
I am a canadian engineer and I was offered to work for a french company in france for a 12 months period. They said I will have to pay social charges such pension and others!!! and it is a significant amount.

are these amounts reimbursable? if not, how can I minimize it?
Is this a troll?
Giving it the benefit of the doubt:

Well the pension contributions might be reimbursable in sense that one day you might get a pension.
The healthcare contributions are reimbursable in the sense that you might need medical care.
The training contributions are reimbursable in the sense that you might want to undertake training.
The unemployment contributions are reimbursable in the sense....
Well I'm sure you get the picture.

It's called social security and the theory is that every member of society pays a fair amount into the pot, based on their earnings, so that every member of society can have access to support when they need it.

Does Canada not have a social security system?
 

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Whoa! Let's back off a bit on the accusations of doing something nefarious here. The way things work in North America, I can vouch for the fact that people there are not terribly aware of how these things like social charges and reciprocity work.

To answer the question, however - yes, if you live and work in France, you will pay income taxes and social charges (called "cotisations") in France rather than in your home country. There are tax and other treaties that spell out the details, but in a nutshell, you'll be covered by the local (French) social system while you are living and working there.

The social charges work out to about 23 to 25% of your gross salary. And come retirement time, you will receive credit for the time you worked in France when reckoning your Canadian or other pension benefit, and (if you wind up staying a bit longer than a single year) you actually may receive a small pension (based on your contributions made in France and your years worked elsewhere). So, nothing is completely wasted here.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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The way things work in North America, I can vouch for the fact that people there are not terribly aware of how these things like social charges and reciprocity work.
Oops didn't realise - grovelling apologies to the OP! I'd always assumed that given its links with France, Canada must have a more European outlook than a US outlook. Just goes to show you should never assume anything :eek:
 

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No harm done, ET. Evidently it used to be the case that if you worked in a country only for a short period of time (i.e. not long enough to qualify for a pension) you were actually reimbursed for your retirement contributions when you left. That changed years ago - though I'm not sure there was ever a "memo" that went out about the situation.

I was actually quite surprised to find out that I was due a (small but regular) pension from Germany after only having worked there for 2 1/2 years.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Be aware that the Macron government has just reduced social security contributions for employees. Although the CSG is increasing by 1.7%, it still remains a win for active (working) people in France.
 
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