Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked this up on the "other" site and thought it worth passing along.....



British tourists are more likely to be killed in Thailand than any other destination, according to new figures released today.

Motorbike accidents are the main reason why 269 Britons died there last year, according to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO).

The figures mean that Thailand has the highest rate of deaths in proportion to the number of British tourists of any country worldwide. In the year to March, an estimated 860,000 British tourists visited Thailand.

This figure also makes Thailand the country where, proportionately, British tourists are most likely to end up in hospital, according to the organisation’s British Behaviour Abroad report, released today.

The majority of 324 reported hospitalisations in Thailand were due to motorbike accidents, says the FCO, and a high proportion are fatal.

The figures for the report are based on incidents reported to British consulates abroad, so actual numbers could be higher.

On the dangers of visiting Thailand, the organisation says: “Many of the hospitalisations in Thailand are the result of motorbike accidents – particularly in the southern islands.

“Thailand has one of the world’s highest road traffic accident rates, almost all of which involve motorbikes.”

The Thai law that states safety helmets must be worn is widely ignored according to the FCO, which contributes to the high number of deaths each year. On average 38 people a day die in motorcycle accidents in Thailand.

The organisation also warns: “You should never hand over your passport as a guarantee against returning a motor scooter or cycle. Unscrupulous owners have been known to hold on to passports against claimed damage to the motor scooter or cycle.”

Further to that, some vehicles are not road worthy. The FCO says that many of the motorcycles and scooters that are available for hire in beach resorts are unregistered and cannot legally be driven on a public road. This could invalidate any travel insurance policy should the driver wish to make a claim.

On the subject of travel insurance, the report found that financial pressures are causing many British holidaymakers to forgo travel insurance in a bid to save money.

Foreign Office Minister, Chris Bryant, said: “Getting comprehensive travel insurance means that whilst an accident may disrupt your holiday, it won’t bankrupt you in extortionate medical or repatriation bills.”

Other trouble hotspots revealed by the report include Spain, where 2,032 Britons were arrested last year. This is higher than any other country, although as a proportion of visitor numbers, the highest number of arrests was in the UAE followed by Thailand.

The majority of arrests are drug-related, with one in seven relating to illegal substances. This is particularly so in Thailand – were a quarter of arrests were due to drugs. The UAE also has a low tolerance of drugs – according to the FCO, many Britons arrested in the UAE are transit passengers, who fall foul of the country’s strict drug laws, which prohibit some prescription drugs that are legal in the UK.

Among the notable cases is that of Tracy Wilkinson, 45, from West Sussex, who was arrested at Dubai airport in 2005 for possession of codeine, which she had been taking for chronic back pain.

Arrests are also due to "bad behaviour". The UAE has a low tolerance of anti-Islamic behaviour and behaviour that is regarded as disrespectful towards UAE officials.

The FCO advises Britons heading to unfamiliar countries to familiarise themselves with local laws and customs before heading abroad.
 
G

·
Yes saw that 'news clipping'. One reason why I refuse to use a bike here (although I'm not sure tuk-tuks are much safer!!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes saw that 'news clipping'. One reason why I refuse to use a bike here (although I'm not sure tuk-tuks are much safer!!)

frogblogger,

What's that old saw, "There are old motorbike riders and there are bold motorbike riders but there aren't any old, bold motorbike riders". Smart move on your part to forsake riding a motorbike. I think tuk tuks are slightly safer since they can more easily be seen by others - but barely so. I'm sure the casualty rates for Yanks is up there as well. :/

Serendipity2
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top