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Good morning/afternoon, all. I have been a lurker on this forum for a while now and I've learned a lot from you experienced expats. I appreciate all of the information that everyone has shared.

I have a few questions which perhaps someone knows the answers to. :eek:

I'm a U.S. citizen and I've lived between Mexicali, Baja California and Southern California (USA) for the past few years (mostly in USA, but often in Mexicali to be with my partner). I never really required an FMM (or the old FMT) because I never go past the "border zone" and I haven't stayed in Mexico for longer than 72 hours at a time. I speak almost fluent Spanish and my partner is a Mexican citizen (probably not relevant, but thought I'd share).

Yesterday, I was offered a job at a fairly large call center in Mexicali for an English speaking position. They gave me a letter that I'm supposed to give to INM, along with an Acuse de Recibo (Declaracion Anual) from the Secretaria de Hacienda y Credito Publico, and they would like for me to start as soon as possible.

Sorry for the somewhat long post, but here are the questions I have:

1. Can I directly apply for the FM3, or is it necessary to get the FMM first?
2. What are the documents that I'm required to bring to INM for the FM3 work visa? I have read a lot of conflicting posts, some of which are likely outdated.
3. Should I start the tramites online, or is it easier to do in person?


In advance, I appreciate any help that anyone has to offer and I look forward to participating in the forum. :D
 

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Good morning/afternoon, all. I have been a lurker on this forum for a while now and I've learned a lot from you experienced expats. I appreciate all of the information that everyone has shared.

I have a few questions which perhaps someone knows the answers to. :eek:

I'm a U.S. citizen and I've lived between Mexicali, Baja California and Southern California (USA) for the past few years (mostly in USA, but often in Mexicali to be with my partner). I never really required an FMM (or the old FMT) because I never go past the "border zone" and I haven't stayed in Mexico for longer than 72 hours at a time. I speak almost fluent Spanish and my partner is a Mexican citizen (probably not relevant, but thought I'd share).

Yesterday, I was offered a job at a fairly large call center in Mexicali for an English speaking position. They gave me a letter that I'm supposed to give to INM, along with an Acuse de Recibo (Declaracion Anual) from the Secretaria de Hacienda y Credito Publico, and they would like for me to start as soon as possible.

Sorry for the somewhat long post, but here are the questions I have:

1. Can I directly apply for the FM3, or is it necessary to get the FMM first?
2. What are the documents that I'm required to bring to INM for the FM3 work visa? I have read a lot of conflicting posts, some of which are likely outdated.
3. Should I start the tramites online, or is it easier to do in person?


In advance, I appreciate any help that anyone has to offer and I look forward to participating in the forum. :D
Congratulations on your new job! Here's a good place to begin:Trámites - Instituto Nacional de Migración
 

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Good morning/afternoon, all. I have been a lurker on this forum for a while now and I've learned a lot from you experienced expats. I appreciate all of the information that everyone has shared.

I have a few questions which perhaps someone knows the answers to. :eek:

I'm a U.S. citizen and I've lived between Mexicali, Baja California and Southern California (USA) for the past few years (mostly in USA, but often in Mexicali to be with my partner). I never really required an FMM (or the old FMT) because I never go past the "border zone" and I haven't stayed in Mexico for longer than 72 hours at a time. I speak almost fluent Spanish and my partner is a Mexican citizen (probably not relevant, but thought I'd share).

Yesterday, I was offered a job at a fairly large call center in Mexicali for an English speaking position. They gave me a letter that I'm supposed to give to INM, along with an Acuse de Recibo (Declaracion Anual) from the Secretaria de Hacienda y Credito Publico, and they would like for me to start as soon as possible.

Sorry for the somewhat long post, but here are the questions I have:

1. Can I directly apply for the FM3, or is it necessary to get the FMM first?
2. What are the documents that I'm required to bring to INM for the FM3 work visa? I have read a lot of conflicting posts, some of which are likely outdated.
3. Should I start the tramites online, or is it easier to do in person?


In advance, I appreciate any help that anyone has to offer and I look forward to participating in the forum. :D
Congrats.

Question on a personal level, what how much would you be making? Just want to see compared to US.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you, Isla Verde. I'm a little confused as to which is the appropriate form to fill out. From the website you suggested, I believe inm.gob.mx/index.php/page/Solicitud_de_Internacion (can't post the actual link, as I'm a new user) is what I'm looking for. Not 100% sure, though.

Thanks, MrOctober430. I'm not really supposed to disclose my salary, but FWIW, I was told that English-speaking agents generally make between $4500 and $8000 (pesos) per month. Supervisors make between $7000 and $10k. It varies based on which contract you are hired for. Other positions (i.e. management/HR) are commensurate with experience/education.

Any more advice that anyone has to offer is much appreciated. Hope everyone is having a nice day.
 

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Thank you, Isla Verde. I'm a little confused as to which is the appropriate form to fill out. From the website you suggested, I believe inm.gob.mx/index.php/page/Solicitud_de_Internacion (can't post the actual link, as I'm a new user) is what I'm looking for. Not 100% sure, though.

Thanks, MrOctober430. I'm not really supposed to disclose my salary, but FWIW, I was told that English-speaking agents generally make between $4500 and $8000 (pesos) per month. Supervisors make between $7000 and $10k. It varies based on which contract you are hired for. Other positions (i.e. management/HR) are commensurate with experience/education.

Any more advice that anyone has to offer is much appreciated. Hope everyone is having a nice day.
I'm assuming you'll enter Mexico with an FMM. Then you have to fill out an application online, print it out, and go with all the required documents to your local INM office. I'll try to find the link to the correct page you need on the INM website.

I hope you won't have to pay rent if you're going to be earning only $4500 to $8000 a month. In particular, earning anything less than the upper end of that pay scale, you're going to have to be really careful with your money!

I hope this will help: http://www.inm.gob.mx/static/tramit...ancia_temporal/VisitanteTecnicoCientifico.pdf

Another possibility is to visit your local INM office and ask them how to get started.
 

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You'll need passport, FMM, birth certificate, bank statements, photos, etc., as well as your employer's documetations.
Start online, save and print the application and create an introductory letter, in Spanish, outlining your intentions to INM.
Your employer should give you assistance/guidance with INM and they're required to provide certain tax information, etc.
 

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You'll need passport, FMM, birth certificate, bank statements, photos, etc., as well as your employer's documetations.
Start online, save and print the application and create an introductory letter, in Spanish, outlining your intentions to INM.
Your employer should give you assistance/guidance with INM and they're required to provide certain tax information, etc.
You shouldn't need bank statements if you're applying for an FM3 lucrativa. At least, I didn't need any when I initially applied for one 5 years ago, and I don't think that part of the rules has changed. Not all employers will give you help with getting the visa, but at least the OP's has given him or her a letter and what I guess is tax information (Acuse de Recibo).
 

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True, but anyone would do well to have statements available, in case the job falls through and he wants to stay and seek another.
 

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True, but anyone would do well to have statements available, in case the job falls through and he wants to stay and seek another.
But if he wants to seek another job, he still won't need bank statements. Aren't they only needed when applying for a rentista visa?
 

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Good morning/afternoon, all. I have been a lurker on this forum for a while now and I've learned a lot from you experienced expats. I

Yesterday, I was offered a job at a fairly large call center in Mexicali for an English speaking position. They gave me a letter that I'm supposed to give to INM, along with an Acuse de Recibo (Declaracion Anual) from the Secretaria de Hacienda y Credito Publico, and they would like for me to start as soon as possible.
In advance, I appreciate any help that anyone has to offer and I look forward to participating in the forum. :D
A couple of items of note;
1. When entering into Mexico the next time, obtain a FMM which is normally valid for 180 days. You must have a FMM prior to applying for your FM3
2. Your new prospective company must already be registered with INM as employing foreigners. If not, you will not be able to obtain the "No Inmigrante-Lucrativa" or commonly known as the FM3 for working for a Mexican company.
3. The letter the company gave you must offer you a work position and must say how much you will make.
4. I was required to show proof of paid taxes for both myself and my company. As such I had to already have a RFC for both, otherwise annotated as persona fisica (me) and person moral (the company). This may not apply in your situation.
5. Copy of your passport
I hope this helps!
 

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Working the System

Greetings from Dusty Monterrey,

I want to thank all the "old timers" on this thread for an amazing amount of very helpful information. It has helped guide me through the cultural acclimation as well as the personal and legal differences I have run up against.

I moved to Mexico from Texas a year ago on July 1rst. (2011) I got my temp tag for the car and a 180 day FMM. I came in at Laredo and drove down to my new home town, Monterrey NL. It has taken me the major portion of the last year to get myself into the network down here and find my place. But now that I have I am as the title of this post states "working the system".

I know that not every step of the process is the same for every person but at least the steps I am going through may help guide others in the adventure called "Let's get a work visa" .

This is what I have done so far.

1. Got a sponsor. I have a specialized skill set that is attractive in today's security minded atmosphere here in Monterrey. Once I secured the agreement from my new employer in the form of a letter stating that my services were needed by the company and I was going to be getting paid xxx for doing xxx on company letter head. I moved to step 2. The company has to be registered with immigration or all this is pointless.

2. Go online and fill out the application for the visa status you need. (inm.gob.mx/index.php/page/Solicitud_de_Estancia) put the 3ws in front of this and it will take you to the exact page. If you use Google chrome the whole page will be translated to English for you. When you are finished it will ask you to a page to confirm and then print. At this point it will give you your Pieza number and a password. Write these down as you will need these to retrieve any information about the status of your application during the whole process. Also print the page that asks you to print in two forms. (at least I did) one hard copy to take with you to the INM and one pdf so you will have a digital copy for future use.

3. Passport and visa - Make 3 copies of your passport pages that have the picture and the one facing it with your other info. Make 3 copies of your current FMM.

4. Privileged form - I call this the privilege form because it allows you the privilege to change your current FMM to an FM3 or 2. Oh and you will have to pay for the privilege too. $550 pesos to be exact. It's called the "Derechos. Productos y Aprovechamientos" form. You can pay the fee at any bank in the country. Keep your receipt. It is now part of the "File" you are assembling.

5. Proof of Residency - I am leasing all bills paid so I included my lease and a copy of the telephone bill from Telmex that has the address of my exact apartment unit on it. The lease and the bill MUST match.

6. Professional Accreditation - I am trained in a specific field of expertise so I was able to use a letter from the manufacture of the product that I specialize in as proof of expertise. Originally I was informed I would need a diploma or certificate with a seal on it. But since I have neither I obtained this letter and it worked for me. (This is serious business here. They DO NOT want to give up a spot in the work force to an outsider if a native can do the same work). In my case it was an extra hoop to jump through.

7. Pictures - You will need 3 front facing infintile fotos and 2 right side infintile profile fotos. I got mine at Benavides farmacia. It cost $90 pesos.

8. The Presentataion - This coming Martes (Tuesday) I will go down to the INM with my "stuff" and make the presentation in front of my personal agent. At that time the agent will review what I have brought with me and if everything is in order give me a form to take to the bank (again any bank will do) and pay $2345 pesos. I will return with the receipt to the same agent.

9. The Card - I am hoping everything goes as planned but I have come to know better. I am surely missing some thing. So once its all said and done I will receive my FM3 card with a stipulation allowing me to take payment (get a paycheck) from a company in Mexico. I was informed that since I am applying for a work FM3 visa that income verification was not necessary. If I was applying for a non work FM# or 2 income verification would be an issue.

Advantages of having the FM3 are instant and very welcome. I was having to drive to the border and renew my auto tag every six months. Now the tag and the deposit are rolled over with each renewal of the FM3. It is your responsibility to notify the customs service that your status has changed. They will require you to file a form but that will stop the auto tag madness.



You will also be allowed to apply for the national health insurance plan. This alone is worth the effort.

I will update this with each step and by the time I am finished we will have an updated process guide for future expats to follow.

Time for a taco and a coca light. Adios amigos!
 

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Working the System (cont)

Well I completed the process and for me it was much less involved than people made it seem like.

Step number #

9. The Presentation went very smoothly. Once I submitted the documents outlined in the above post I was told to be looking for an email from INM or I could check the internet using the information and password I received from them to see what the status was. That page is located here:
(add 3 w's)inm.gob.mx/index.php/page/Seguimiento_de_Tramite

I was told it would be up to 2 weeks. I got the notice in two days. It is a very legal looking document that outlines the exact things they need and the time you have to submit before the process is closed.

I was asked to resubmit the letter from my sponsoring employer with wage information as well as the exact location of my office and a detailed job description. On company letter head. I thought I already gave them this. (The salary info was missing from the original. )

I was asked to pay the $550 pesos mentioned in step #4 above again. Fortunately I received a stamped receipt of payment from the original presentation. I showed that and it was good enough.

I was asked to pay the $2356 pesos at the bank of my choice and supply the receipt.


I returned within the allotted 10 business days with my request documents. The agent reviewed them and said everything was "muy bueno" and I told to return in three days.

Three days later I returned and was directed to "go upstairs". After another brief review and some questions about marriage status, religion and other things they seem to think are important I was asked to sign my card and it was lamented and I had my FM3 work visa.

I will visit the Aduana at the Monterrey airport this coming week to submit my letter of notice. This will change my visa status on my auto import file. Saving my deposit and extending the validity of the sticker on my car for the length of the visa.

Here is an example of the letter I am using. It is at the bottom of this page. The page is full of current information.

yucalandia(dot)wordpress(dot)com/driving-in-mexico-issues-fun/importing-driving-a-car-in-mexico/

If all goes well I will report back that this is a completed process.:clap2:
 

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Thank you - excellent posts, SailingAwayFromHere.
 

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Working in Mexico

Good morning/afternoon, all. I have been a lurker on this forum for a while now and I've learned a lot from you experienced expats. I appreciate all of the information that everyone has shared.

I have a few questions which perhaps someone knows the answers to. :eek:

I'm a U.S. citizen and I've lived between Mexicali, Baja California and Southern California (USA) for the past few years (mostly in USA, but often in Mexicali to be with my partner). I never really required an FMM (or the old FMT) because I never go past the "border zone" and I haven't stayed in Mexico for longer than 72 hours at a time. I speak almost fluent Spanish and my partner is a Mexican citizen (probably not relevant, but thought I'd share).

Yesterday, I was offered a job at a fairly large call center in Mexicali for an English speaking position. They gave me a letter that I'm supposed to give to INM, along with an Acuse de Recibo (Declaracion Anual) from the Secretaria de Hacienda y Credito Publico, and they would like for me to start as soon as possible.

Sorry for the somewhat long post, but here are the questions I have:

1. Can I directly apply for the FM3, or is it necessary to get the FMM first?
2. What are the documents that I'm required to bring to INM for the FM3 work visa? I have read a lot of conflicting posts, some of which are likely outdated.
3. Should I start the tramites online, or is it easier to do in person?


In advance, I appreciate any help that anyone has to offer and I look forward to participating in the forum. :D
Working Visa is a FM2. You might have to get the Tourist Visa first = walking up to the border filling out a form and voila, you got it before applying for the FM2? Now if you are in the USA and go to a Mexican Consulate with all of the below documents listed in the next paragraph, you probably won't have to have any prior Visa not even a Tourist Visa. You will go directly to a FM2 Visa status.

FM2, I was offered this year at Mexican Immigraccion. They wanted like $3600.00 pesos/ year for that. Have to bring your Bank Statements, US Passport any Marriage Certificates (if any) and a couple of pictures exactly to their dimensions and that new offer to work will need to show much they will be paying you? Since they in essence are sponcering you, it's pretty much a slam dunk for you. Often someone in Human Resources in the new company that you will be working for will go over to Mexican Immigration with you or send one of their Lawyers with you to get it all expedited. Just ask for their assistance, and they will probably gladly help with it. As, they want and employee usually "yesterday". This might take 3 weeks, but with the Company Lawyer representing your new company and you, probably they can grease it through earlier. I mean out of common courtesy. NEVER, NEVER, NEVER offer and even joke about giving a "propina" or any money numeration to get things expedited at any Federal Agency. At a minimum you will be shown the Border real quick, or maybe even charged and jailed.

Next as you renew each year you will need to make a decision after 5 years? Do you want to become a full fledged Mexican Citizen? in that case you will have to take like a little history test and prove "some proficiency" in Spanish, as they will be conducting the whole thing in Spanish, Or, would you like to become a Resident Alien, where you have all the rights of a Mexicano including buying property in excluded zones for foreigners without having to buy with a Bank Trust, but you will not be able to vote - big deal eh? You will have to give up your foreign titled vehicle and buy a Mexican one unless it's like over 10 years old, then you can pay the tax on it and import it legally, and register and tag it in Baja Norte or what ever state you move to then.

Or, you can at that time let lapse your FM2, go back to a tourist Visa, or get a FM3 = non-Resident, but you can keep your car in as long as you stay in the country. Your car permit goes with the FM3 Visa. This is typically what long term Residents in Mexico, that don't want to work or have a business get. That will all be up to you. Right now the FM3 is running about $1250 pesos/ year.

The advantage of the FM2 migrating to a Perminent Resident Alien is that after 5 years they give you a card, and you don't have to come back each year and keep paying them. No hassles either about potential hassles with US Authorities as their's no mix up about any dual citizenship potential issues in the future.

Hope, that helps?

Cuyler
 

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Working Visa is a FM2.
A point of correction: An FM3 can be working or non-working. An FM2 can be working or non-working.

I’ve experienced this first-hand. I started off with a non-working FM2, and when I got a job offer I got it changed to one with work permission.
 

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A point of correction: An FM3 can be working or non-working. An FM2 can be working or non-working.

I’ve experienced this first-hand. I started off with a non-working FM2, and when I got a job offer I got it changed to one with work permission.
That's true. I have had an FM3 (now No Inmigrante) lucrativa since 2008, which allows me to work as a free-lance English teacher and translator.
 
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