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Can you please give advise about finding job in Spain?

1) How to approach potential recruiters?
2) Where should I target them? on LinkedIn or on job sites?
3) How I convince them to hire me
4) Is it helpful to call recruiters who post jobs on job sites?

I am working with in UAE.
 

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You don't say what work you are looking for or even if you have a visa that allows you to work, but, without trying to put you of, I would say the answers are as follows:

1) How to approach potential recruiters?
In whatever format they announce the opportunities (i.e. through recruitment sites, by e-mail etc) and always in Spanish if the opportunity is posted in Spanish. If there is no published opportunity, and you are "cold calling" always in Spanish.

2) Where should I target them? on LinkedIn or on job sites?
Depends where you find the opportunity, many company sites have a "postbox" for people to deposit CVs (in Spanish of course).

3) How I convince them to hire me
Firstly they should only consider a non EU national if there are are none who can do the job, so convince them that you can do something that no European can do. Tell them that you are legally resident in Spain, give your address (it is very difficult to get a job without being physically present in Spain). If you exercise a controlled profession, prove that you have your title homologated by the applicable Spanish authority.

4) Is it helpful to call recruiters who post jobs on job sites?
Yes, if they provide a number to call and you can speak good Spanish.

Above all, remember that there are literally hundreds of applicants for most jobs in Spain due to excessively high unemployment and many people will work for low wages (considering the cost of living). So set your expectations low at the beginning and plan to work towards a decent level over the years.
 

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You don't say what work you are looking for or even if you have a visa that allows you to work, but, without trying to put you of, I would say the answers are as follows:

1) How to approach potential recruiters?
In whatever format they announce the opportunities (i.e. through recruitment sites, by e-mail etc) and always in Spanish if the opportunity is posted in Spanish. If there is no published opportunity, and you are "cold calling" always in Spanish.

2) Where should I target them? on LinkedIn or on job sites?
Depends where you find the opportunity, many company sites have a "postbox" for people to deposit CVs (in Spanish of course).

3) How I convince them to hire me
Firstly they should only consider a non EU national if there are are none who can do the job, so convince them that you can do something that no European can do. Tell them that you are legally resident in Spain, give your address (it is very difficult to get a job without being physically present in Spain). If you exercise a controlled profession, prove that you have your title homologated by the applicable Spanish authority.

4) Is it helpful to call recruiters who post jobs on job sites?
Yes, if they provide a number to call and you can speak good Spanish.

Above all, remember that there are literally hundreds of applicants for most jobs in Spain due to excessively high unemployment and many people will work for low wages (considering the cost of living). So set your expectations low at the beginning and plan to work towards a decent level over the years.
As I understand it, the OP does not live in Spain (legally or otherwise) and does not currently have a visa for Spain - rather, he is looking for a job in Spain (or France) that will enable him to eventually become resident. So, the OP should definitely not tell an employer that he is legally resident - it would be counter-productive in any case as the employer would not then take the necessary steps for him to get a visa to work in Spain.
 

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Do you have specialist skills that cannot be filled by Spanish/EU members? If you don't then I fear you'll have problems finding work in Spain or come to that, the EU.

Good luck for the future.
 

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As I understand it, the OP does not live in Spain (legally or otherwise) and does not currently have a visa for Spain - rather, he is looking for a job in Spain (or France) that will enable him to eventually become resident. So, the OP should definitely not tell an employer that he is legally resident - it would be counter-productive in any case as the employer would not then take the necessary steps for him to get a visa to work in Spain.
Fair enough, but there was no information to that effect in the OP.

My post was based on getting a job by getting here first, but you are right that that is not going to work. But getting a job in Spain from overseas is going to be tricky. I have tried it!
 

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Fair enough, but there was no information to that effect in the OP.

My post was based on getting a job by getting here first, but you are right that that is not going to work. But getting a job in Spain from overseas is going to be tricky. I have tried it!
Overlandout, because of unemployment rates in Spain or because of the employment process? Or some other reason(s)?
 
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