Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a 26-year old American. I've been living in France since 2011. I had two long-stay au pair visas, but since August I have been granted a carte de séjour vie privée et familiale because I married a very lovely Frenchman.

I am currently an ESL teacher, but I studied theatre at a university in the United States, and the original reason why I came to France was to study at l'École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq. It's a 2-year program, and unfortunately it's somewhere between 7-8,000 euros per year. Because it is a private institution, they do not accept aid from the government and therefore cannot provide students with financial assistance. They recommend researching organizations like CROUS or CAMPUS FRANCE.

I've lived in Paris before, and I'm no stranger to how incredibly expensive it is to live there. I just cannot fathom being a student and going to class 30 hours per week and being able to afford the school's fees, rent, bills, groceries, etc. without holding down a full-time career. So there must be an answer, right? Is every one of their students just rich as God? There must be financial assistance available to performance students... right?

The thing is, I'm a little confused about my status and what sort of financial aid I should be looking for. Most grants and scholarships are for American students wishing to study abroad... but I'm already a resident of France (not a citizen). Because I have my carte de séjour, would I be searching for scholarships and grants available to French citizens? Most of the scholarships or grants that I find are for students of medicine, engineering, or other sciences. But I am under the impression that France supports its artists, so there must be something out there that I am not seeing.

I'm sorry if this seems confusing, I'm quite confused myself and I feel a little lost as far as research goes. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated, thank you so much for taking the time to read this.
 
G

·
If you are american wouldn't you be looking to get a USA government student loan? Awards in France for citizens are just that, for citizens which you are not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you are american wouldn't you be looking to get a USA government student loan? Awards in France for citizens are just that, for citizens which you are not.

Well, that is exactly my question. I wasn't sure which to search for. Thank you for the response.
 
G

·
Is there residence in the usa needed to qualify for loans? I know you can use them to study abroad which you are doing despite being a resident. Just depends if they need residence prior to applying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is there residence in the usa needed to qualify for loans? I know you can use them to study abroad which you are doing despite being a resident. Just depends if they need residence prior to applying.


That's a good question. I will continue to research and if I find any answers before other members of the forum, I will update in case future expats need advice.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,765 Posts
Since most French university students are going to the French public universities, there aren't really "scholarships" as such. There are various housing and insurance benefits - but since you're married, it's assumed that your husband is contributing to your support (and, in fact, he is legally obligated to do so). However, it you're eligible for the various benefits, you should look into that. There are actually very few benefits here that are not available to a non-citizen with a valid carte de séjour.

If you were here on a student visa, you'd be entitled to work a fixed number of hours per year. It works out to 20 hours a week, but what most students do is to work during the school holidays and over the summer to pull together a nest-egg to support themselves during the school term (along with whatever Mom and Dad or the spouse can contribute). Also, many students simply live at home with Mom and Dad during their studies.

My husband's son (a French citizen) went to a private university here, and my husband paid his tuition and contributed to his support. The son also worked over his school holidays, and was able to get paying (though not much) stages as part of his studies. (Frankly, the kid can make a penny scream, as the old saying goes, so he got along just fine... but not everyone lives as sparsely as my husband's son.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
since you're married, it's assumed that your husband is contributing to your support (and, in fact, he is legally obligated to do so). However, it you're eligible for the various benefits, you should look into that. There are actually very few benefits here that are not available to a non-citizen with a valid carte de séjour.
Thank you for the feedback, Bev, I appreciate it. Actually, my husband is currently finishing his last year of studies and his father supports him financially, so I'm the only true breadwinner of the household at the moment. I have a very low-paying job with minimal hours teaching English in Franche-Comté, so unfortunately saving up money isn't an option at the moment. We applied for CAF housing assistance, but they denied us because the area of our apartment is "too small". Trust me, CAF, if we had the money, we wouldn't be living in such a tiny apartment!

Oh, if only I had been blessed with wealthy parents.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
Contact these people:

Fongecif Franche Comte

They don't have unlimited funds, and every application is examined on its merit fairly strictly. Get your application in early - or at least start talking to them to see if you have an outside chance of funding.

My daughter has - somewhat exceptionally - got her fees and a subsistence allowance from them for her year-long CAPES at Ecole Estheticienne in Clermont. They DO drag their heels so be prepared for that, and it's based on your past working history, so there's masses of paperwork to collect for your dossier, along with testimonials that you will stick it out and it will be a useful addition to your portfolio/cv.

I can't promise it will come to anything - they, in Clermont, fund only about 1 in 40 applications, and for my daughter's course, only about 1 in a few hundred, but it's perhaps worth trying. Only advice I can give is to put a LOT of effort into getting your dossier together, if they allow you to submit one, and then be VERY VERY patient. (Ziss iz La France .....:))

hils
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top