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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am selling my UK home and want to rent long term in France. My wife and I are retired and in receipt of state and work pensions. What are the tax implications. eg Can we leave our pensions to accrue in our uk bank whilst living off the capital in France?
 

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I am selling my UK home and want to rent long term in France. My wife and I are retired and in receipt of state and work pensions. What are the tax implications. eg Can we leave our pensions to accrue in our uk bank whilst living off the capital in France?
Hi,
If you become french resident , and by selling your home in UK and living full-time in france - you will be, then all your income world-wide (regardless of where it is physically), is taxable in France (only exceptions, rent from a UK property, and government pensions ie. police, civil servant etc).
As a UK state pensioner you will qualify for french health cover paid for by the UK under S1 arrangement.
French tax is not too onerous on moderate incomes , especially pensions. Last year a couple with just pensions would have paid no tax if their combined pensions (less 10%) were less than 26277€ , and then the next 34148€ would have been taxed at 14%.
 

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Yes you can do as you suggest but I should point out that France is not a cheap place to live you probably need as much to live on on a daily basis here as you would in UK;
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi,
If you become french resident , and by selling your home in UK and living full-time in france - you will be, then all your income world-wide (regardless of where it is physically), is taxable in France (only exceptions, rent from a UK property, and government pensions ie. police, civil servant etc).
As a UK state pensioner you will qualify for french health cover paid for by the UK under S1 arrangement.
French tax is not too onerous on moderate incomes , especially pensions. Last year a couple with just pensions would have paid no tax if their combined pensions (less 10%) were less than 26277€ , and then the next 34148€ would have been taxed at 14%.
Thank you for prompt reply. That's how I thought it might pan out. Cheers.
 
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