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After 10 1/2 years here I finally got around to applying for Mexican citizenship. SRE told me it should only take 3 months so it will be a slightly late birthday present to myself.

I can't wait. Now if the board could eliminate this "expat" status I would be happy. Don't really like that word.

Stan
 

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"Expatriate," or "expat" is still the/a correct term to describe your status ... once you become a Mexican citizen ... from what I understand of the custom and use of that word/term/description.
 

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I don´t see anything wrong the the term Expat. Longford is correct, even after naturalization you technically will still be an Expat. :)
 

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Don't you worry, Expat is not used in Mexico, it is not even a legal term. Expat is only used by the "Expats"
 

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"Expatriate," or "expat" is still the/a correct term to describe your status ... once you become a Mexican citizen ... from what I understand of the custom and use of that word/term/description.
There was an interesting discussion of this point in another thread recently. Apparently, people of European descent who immigrate to other countries are referred to as "expatriates". Others who immigrate are referred to as "immigrants". Thus Mexicans who move to the US are immigrants, but US people who move to Mexico are expatriates.

On a related topic, since Mexicans who become US citizens are often referred to as Mexican-American (like Chinese-American, Afro-American, etc), shouldn't US citizens who become Mexican citizens be referred to as American-Mexicans?
 

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After 10 1/2 years here I finally got around to applying for Mexican citizenship. SRE told me it should only take 3 months so it will be a slightly late birthday present to myself.

I can't wait. Now if the board could eliminate this "expat" status I would be happy. Don't really like that word.

Stan
I can understand, Stan! I look forward to doing the same thing one day in the future. For almost all of my adult life my Mexican friends (and others) have referred to me as another Mexican because of how well I blended in - and because of my love for the country, culture, people & the language. For me, it was an honor (and it was great) to be "pigeon-holed" many times in the Army to linguistic &cultural functions because of it. I fly both the US & Mexican flags (except on US holidays) and call our home "the embassy".

When someone asked me if my desire to apply for Mexican citizenship didn't seem somewhat unpatriotic - I told them NO... it was my way of honoring & combining my love for both countries & cultures. Personally, I think it will be the perfect capstone to how I raised my family to be truly bi-cultural!
 

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There was an interesting discussion of this point in another thread recently. Apparently, people of European descent who immigrate to other countries are referred to as "expatriates". Others who immigrate are referred to as "immigrants". Thus Mexicans who move to the US are immigrants, but US people who move to Mexico are expatriates.

On a related topic, since Mexicans who become US citizens are often referred to as Mexican-American (like Chinese-American, Afro-American, etc), shouldn't US citizens who become Mexican citizens be referred to as American-Mexicans?
It may be correct, as you say, but the term EXPAT is not used in Mexico by anyone but the so called Expats.

Try and ask any given Mexican if they know what an expat is, just for fun
 

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On a related topic, since Mexicans who become US citizens are often referred to as Mexican-American (like Chinese-American, Afro-American, etc), shouldn't US citizens who become Mexican citizens be referred to as American-Mexicans?
No; they refer to themselves as Naturalized American Citizens not Mexican Americans. You have to be born in the US to be refered to that. Big difference.

When I had a run-in with a couple of Border Patrol agents near Calexico on the highway I said I am an American Citizen. One went to his jeep to check his computer and came back and told me I was a Naturalized American Citizen. LOL
 

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Thus Mexicans who move to the US are immigrants, but US people who move to Mexico are expatriates.
Yes, interesting how people describe the same/similar things so differently

On a related topic, since Mexicans who become US citizens are often referred to as Mexican-American (like Chinese-American, Afro-American, etc), shouldn't US citizens who become Mexican citizens be referred to as American-Mexicans?
Yes, "American-Mexicans," that would be an interesting and unlikely label to be applied ... by anyone. :) No matter their nation of origin, a Canadian or American from the USA will always be seen as a foreigner ... by whatever label is applied by Mexicans. I get a kick out of some expats who become Mexican citizens who profess so strongly, it seem to me, that they're Mexican. Yes, by naturalization they are .. that's accurate. But do they really think local residents in Mexico are going to view them as "Mexican"? Not likely. :eek:
 

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On a related topic, since Mexicans who become US citizens are often referred to as Mexican-American (like Chinese-American, Afro-American, etc), shouldn't US citizens who become Mexican citizens be referred to as American-Mexicans?
No, sigues siendo un p*nche ******!


Just joking.
 

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No; they refer to themselves as Naturalized American Citizens not Mexican Americans. You have to be born in the US to be refered to that. Big difference.

When I had a run-in with a couple of Border Patrol agents near Calexico on the highway I said I am an American Citizen. One went to his jeep to check his computer and came back and told me I was a Naturalized American Citizen. LOL
I didn't know that.
 

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No; they refer to themselves as Naturalized American Citizens not Mexican Americans. You have to be born in the US to be refered to that. Big difference.

When I had a run-in with a couple of Border Patrol agents near Calexico on the highway I said I am an American Citizen. One went to his jeep to check his computer and came back and told me I was a Naturalized American Citizen. LOL
They always need a way to discriminate, otherwise, they would loose power (In their stupid minds)
 

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They always need a way to discriminate, otherwise, they would loose power (In their stupid minds)
While the question/answer might seem trivial to the average person, there is a legal, technical distinction between the two categories of citizenship and that fact will be what pops-up when the Border Patrol agents run a check on someone .. and, if anything, such agents tend to be technical oriented ... especially so in the border zone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My objection to the term expat refers to the fact that it originally referred to "entitled" people. I have never viewed my status in Mexico as an expat, I considered myself an immigrant.

I don't spend alot of time with foreigners so I am well aware that my friends don't understand the word expat and it is only used by "expats".

It is just I would prefer to be called immigrant, then when I get my citizenship, Mexican. Yes I know I am not native born, but my friends already consider me Mexican.
 

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While the question/answer might seem trivial to the average person, there is a legal, technical distinction between the two categories of citizenship and that fact will be what pops-up when the Border Patrol agents run a check on someone .. and, if anything, such agents tend to be technical oriented ... especially so in the border zone.
Are you a Lawyer?
 

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My objection to the term expat refers to the fact that it originally referred to "entitled" people. I have never viewed my status in Mexico as an expat, I considered myself an immigrant. I don't spend alot of time with foreigners so I am well aware that my friends don't understand the word expat and it is only used by "expats". It is just I would prefer to be called immigrant, then when I get my citizenship, Mexican. Yes I know I am not native born, but my friends already consider me Mexican.
Once you get your Citizenship you will be Mexican. Period
To me, as you chose Mexico, my Country to live and become a Citizen, you are already Mexican!
 

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My objection to the term expat refers to the fact that it originally referred to "entitled" people. I have never viewed my status in Mexico as an expat, I considered myself an immigrant.

I don't spend alot of time with foreigners so I am well aware that my friends don't understand the word expat and it is only used by "expats".

It is just I would prefer to be called immigrant, then when I get my citizenship, Mexican. Yes I know I am not native born, but my friends already consider me Mexican.
The problem you think is normal for you is a matter of symantics.

You will never be a Mexican, ethnically. You will be an American who has become a Naturalized Citizen of Mexico. You can call yourself a Mexican Citizen but not a Mexican. That is reserved for Mexican Nationals and their children wherever they are born and become citizens of. Mexican Canadian, Mexican American, Mexican Peruvian etc.. :)
 

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The problem you think is normal for you is a matter of symantics. You will never be a Mexican, ethnically. You will be an American who has become a Naturalized Citizen of Mexico. You can call yourself a Mexican Citizen but not a Mexican. That is reserved for Mexican Nationals and their children wherever they are born and become citizens of. Mexican Canadian, Mexican American, Mexican Peruvian etc.. :)
Ethnically? What is an ethnicall Mexican? As far as I know, we come in as many colors, religions, races as you may possibly think He will always be treated as foreigner, if his Mexican Spanish is not perfect, so what? Many people speak in a funny manner here and there, and they have nationalities beyond any question
 

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Culturally is a better word.
This week on the way back to Mexico from Europe I was sitting next to a man who was born in France but who was moved to Mexico as a baby, he was raised there and educated there, got married to a Mexican woman and had children in Mexico . He took on the Mexican citizenship and although he was naturalized he is Mexican cutlturally.
He moved his family to Europe from DF because he wanted to have his kids educated there and was uncomfortable with the security in Mexico.
He first moved to Barcelona but quickly found out that despite speaking Spanish, that was not his place.
Moved to Lausanne where he could speak French but is planning to move to Portugal the minute his kids go to university because it was " more like Mexico". He misses Mexico and is just as Mexican as if he were born there.

By the way many Mexicans do not speak Spanish, does that make them "less Mexican".

Naturalized foreigners in the US call themselves Americans,naturalized Frenc people call themselves French and same anywhere like it or not. So we were born in a different country so what? I lived in France for 25 years, 30 years in the States and 15 years in France and I am a citizen of the 2 countries where I lived the less time...Should I all myself an American like the French call me?
 

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From the Mexican Constitution, Article 37,
A) La nacionalidad mexicana se pierde:
III. Por residir, siendo mexicano por naturalizacion, durante cinco años continuos en el pais de su origen.
IV. Por hacerse pasar en cualquier instrumento publico, siendo mexicano por naturalizacion, como extranjero o por obtener y usar un pasaporte extranjero.


So here are two things that would cause a naturalized Mexican to lose their nationality:
III) Live outside Mexico in their homeland for 5 years consecutively.
IV) Identify themselves as a foreigner in any (Mexican) public deed (e.g., a property deed or a government contract).
 
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