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Okay I'm ready to send in the last 6 years.Just want to make sure I got it right.My

accounts are joint accounts.I filled out part 1 with my info and filled out part 3

block 26-33 with my wifes info for each of the accounts.Now I have to sign block

44 and send these in.Or does my wife also have to sign.IIRC only I have to sign,I

think.

thanks in advance

Bernie.
 

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If you're the only one who has to file (i.e. your wife isn't a US citizen or green card holder), then no, she doesn't have to sign.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I've just completed the exact same exercise! The notes on page 8 under signatures state: "A spouse included as a joint owner, who does not file a separate FBAR in accordance with the instructions in Part III, must also sign the FBAR (in item 44) for the jointly owner accounts."

I think that means she does need to sign?

Did you also spot that you need to put (spouse) next to your wife's surname on each joint account?
 

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Oooops, or does that mean as Bev says, if she's not a USC/green card holder, she doesn't need to sign? Sorry, I should keep my mouth shut!
 

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Why would any person who is not a USC or a US resident sign any US government form? My wife (who is Canadian) hasn't signed my FBAR in the past and won't in the future.

She has no SS#, no taxpayer i.d. #, and has no obligations whatsoever to the US government. I consider it invasive that they even ask for her name. I report the existence and balance of the account because I have signatory authority and that is all they need to know. I don't believe they need to know even that but that's the price I have to pay for not shedding my US citizenship years ago.

These are not "foreign accounts" and they aren't secret. These are accounts in a bank in the town where I live that any normal person who has a life and more than 99 dollars would have. Her mistake was marrying a USC. My mistake is still being a USC.
 

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Frankly it's still sort of an open question. I've seen instructions on the IRS website that indicate that you only have to put "spouse" (and not a name) if you're declaring a bank account held jointly with a spouse where the spouse is an NRA.

If the Treasury Dept. has a problem with what you've sent in, they'll be in touch. Contrary to popular belief, as long as you are declaring your accounts, they'll work with you on any minor mistakes or omissions on the form. (Or possibly just let the whole thing slide as long as there is no indication that you're "hiding" something from them.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Just an FYI on this topic: I filed 4 years of FBARs back in October 2011. I received a letter from the Dept of Treasury last week. My accountant had filed the older version of the FBAR form for 2007 and the newer form for 2008-2010, and apparently that was the wrong thing to do. You always use the most recent form. So I need to re-do 2007 and re-submit it.

In any case, I'm happy to know that my FBARs have actually been received.

The letter also makes note of the new online FBAR submission process. Has anyone registered to submit the FBAR online for 2011?

I wrote my husband's name on previous years FBAR, but as for this year I will be writing "Non-US person" for any information about jointly owned accounts.
 

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I've decided to play it really safe and have provided my husband's details for the jointly owner accounts (gave his UK NI number for the tax ID and labelled it as such) and had him (reluctantly) sign it.

I'm in a slightly different position to many on the forums here. I don't have any ties to the US and have no desire to live there. I'm hoping to have renounced my US citizenship by the end of October so I want to ensure that, if anything, I've provided unecessary information (e.g. husband's signature).

I do think it's a gross invasion of privacy for DH, but hey ho, with any luck I'll then just need to file 2012 and be done with it all.
 

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I've decided to play it really safe and have provided my husband's details for the jointly owner accounts (gave his UK NI number for the tax ID and labelled it as such) and had him (reluctantly) sign it.

I'm in a slightly different position to many on the forums here. I don't have any ties to the US and have no desire to live there. I'm hoping to have renounced my US citizenship by the end of October so I want to ensure that, if anything, I've provided unecessary information (e.g. husband's signature).

I do think it's a gross invasion of privacy for DH, but hey ho, with any luck I'll then just need to file 2012 and be done with it all.
Ah, the old "baffle 'em with BS" approach. It's not necessary, but I'll admit to having done similar things (usually just to amuse myself). Not sure it does any good - but if it makes you feel better, then go for it!
Cheers,
Bev
 

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:D What will probably annoy them is that I have a couple of accounts that I no longer use but haven't got round to closing. One has had less than $5 in it for the past 6 years, the other has had the grand sum of $0.10. I have still duly reported them. :p

(I will now bow out and stop disrupting this thread. Apologies to the OP :D )
 

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Yup, I've got three accounts with $0 balance that I've taken perverse delight in dutifully reporting for the last few years. The FBAR instructions clearly state that you must report ALL accounts once you hit that $10k threshold, so there they are.

I don't make the rules; I just try to comply as best I can. FBAR is essentially a make work project anyway so why not work with 'em! Maybe dealing with a useless blizzard of FBAR forms containing useless information will divert them from ruining the life of some hapless person who really does have a problem. Additionally, I fill 'em out by hand and submit by mail just to further waste their time. The last thing I want is to efile and have more of my personal information floating around out there in cyberspace.

I, too, am planning my renunciation and exit from this insane US tax system. I am working diligently to get all my paperwork "ducks" in a row so that nothing stands in the way of my five year plan.

Ironically, if every US expat everywhere in the world suddenly filed all the paperwork that they are technically supposed to file it would probably bring the IRS to a screeching halt. I've heard that compliance is extremely low; on the order of 5%. No one knows for sure.
 
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