Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I am looking to do some summer work for the 2014 season in France, flexible on the region. I have visited France only several times and my French language is still minimal as I am only in the beginners stage of learning.

However I would love to get out there for a few months to do some work, I am not naïve enough to think that it will be an overly great job or pay but its all experience and will give me an idea of what I would like to do from there within France.

Does anyone know where to start looking for genuine summer jobs for English speakers? I have had a look myself but any advice or tips would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you/ Merci x
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,289 Posts
Holidaybreak and PGL are the main ones if it's receptionist/activity/campsite-type work you're looking for. This is the right time of year to apply, they will have started selecting already and the jobs get snapped up pretty quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
What kind of work are you looking for and what is the minimum type of accommodation will you live in ie caravan, bed sit or would you only want to live in a hotel. a rural or town/city location.
accommodation and food are generally provided for a return of your services.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
Food for thought!

You can look for low key employment (work for food & a roof), search for communal living and post a 'position wanted' at Diggers and Dreamers - The Guide to Communal Living in Britain

Or why not try WWOOFing; a world wide exchange network where bed, board and practical experience are given in return for help on organic farms.

Just offering some 'outside of the box' ideas!! Bon courage, Gypsycob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Holidaybreak and PGL are the main ones if it's receptionist/activity/campsite-type work you're looking for. This is the right time of year to apply, they will have started selecting already and the jobs get snapped up pretty quickly.
Thanks I will certainly look into that :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What kind of work are you looking for and what is the minimum type of accommodation will you live in ie caravan, bed sit or would you only want to live in a hotel. a rural or town/city location.
accommodation and food are generally provided for a return of your services.
Really workwise anything that I can do talking minimal French whilst I am still learning. Probably be best off in a tourist area I'm thinking, that way probably more ops for English speakers. Just a guess really. Perhaps bar, hotel, camp work, I'm pretty flexible on the role, accommodation wise it doesn't have to be a hotel no. It would be great if accommodation etc was provided with the role as that would be less to sort out and worry about.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
I'd suggest you should prioritise a job with accommodation: in any tourist area where you might get a job, accommodation is desperately expensive - bear in mind anything lettable will be let at peak season rates, so - in Corsica, f'rinstance, you'd earn maybe 350E/week, but you'd need to spend around 500E/week for somewhere reasonable to stay. Even if you went with a tent, you'd be spending around 200E/week just for the pitch on a campsite, leaving you with max. 150E to eat, travel and have some fun, which isn't a lot in any tourist area.

You might be better looking for something like a 3-month au-pair arrangement.

hils
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,289 Posts
Campsite courier with the companies I mentioned or others that operate the same way: you do a week's training in the UK around March, then you go out to your campsite in France or wherever, you can choose where you go up to a point. Your fares there and back are arranged for you and paid for and you have accommodation provided, usually a tent sometimes shared, and sometimes meals provided too. Depending on what position you get you might spend a lot of time cleaning, entertaining kiddies, whatever. The pay is peanuts but the best thing about it is the chance live in a great place with the basics provided and working with a team of like-minded people who are all there to work hard but most of all to have a good time. You don't save much but it can be the experience of a lifetime. Probably my best season was in Hérault, from April to September I lived in a tent right next to a vineyard and I watched the vines grow from tiny twigs to a lush harvest, woke up every morning listening to the crickets, explored the area, spent days on beaches on the Med, visited Nimes, Pont du Gard, the mountains, so many great memories, I wouldn't have missed it for the world.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
That's so ET, and I too spent summers working for peanuts, usually in hotels, so I did have accommodation provided - BUT, in those days, I did have back-up support from my parents, and I'm not sure there are that many youngsters in that fortunate position any more.

There are some murmurrings about foreign (UK and Irish, predominantly) companies hiring from their home countries to implant employees all over the place, and not paying, therefore, into the French system. Bev knows more about that, I think.

h
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,289 Posts
There are some murmurrings about foreign (UK and Irish, predominantly) companies hiring from their home countries to implant employees all over the place, and not paying, therefore, into the French system. Bev knows more about that, I think.

h
Yes indeed, it's been rumbling on for years. What tends to happen, or so I've heard, is that every now and again one of the big companies has to fight a court case, after which they get their inhouse lawyers on the job making their contracts bullet proof again in the light of any new precedents or legislation, and the smaller companies ride on the big boys' backs and copy the contracts word for word, that way everyone is safe until the fisc launches a new challenge from a different angle. The bottom line is that if the UK companies had to start pay French social charges for all their employees and observe French employment law, this particular sector of the UK holiday industry would collapse on the spot. They operate on a low margin already, wages are their biggest expense and their UK client base would not stand the hike in prices that would be necessary - UK families wouldn't go abroad on camping/adventure holidays if the price for accommodation was several times the cost of camping in the UK and probably about the same as staying in a luxury hotel.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
I don't understand all the economics of it, but isn't that set-up giving UK/Irish companies an unfair advantage over French companies doing the same thing in situ? AFAIK, wages in France are lower than in UK/Ireland, and if they're the biggest outlay, why wouldn't it sort of even itself out? And, if UK families can't save to afford a holiday in France at a slightly higher cost, why should they deserve holidays at cut-price rates in a country which is deriving no State advantage (apart from the punters' local spending, and an awful lot of them DO arrive with grocery boxes overfull of UK products rather than buying locally) ? Why can't UK families pay the same, if not more, than the locals - as already noted, wages are higher in the UK and unemployment is lower? In theory, at least, the UK families should have MORE disposable income to be able to pay proper rates ...

Genuine question: I'm not trying to be belligerent for the sake of it.

hils
 
  • Like
Reactions: Xrac

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,289 Posts
It's not the wages though is it, it's simply the cost of establishing an operating company and paying massive social charges for every employee. In a sense, why should they - the companies have corporate insurance that covers employee healthcare and every contingency, they don't cost France anything, so why should the UK operators contribute a shedload of cotsations to a social security system that neither they nor their employees will ever need to use? They pay holiday tax and they don't compete with the locals - they are very strict in not allowing bookings to be made on the spot in France; if someone turns up on site and asks if they can have a tent for the night, you have to make them phone the UK booking centre and arrange the booking and payment through there. Then, if the UK operators have to pull out of France, that will be a lot of people in the UK will lose their jobs. The French companies who they lease the pitches off will lose the quite considerable rent and have accommodation standing empty (because if the sites thought they could fill the place themselves they wouldn't let the Brit tour operators in, they don't like us much). UK kids won't have the work opportunity any more. Hard to see who will win. The key question of course is why can't UK families pay the same if not more than the locals - well the COULD but most of them won't because UK consumer mentality is to find the cheapest option and then try to get it a bit cheaper. Same reason as some tourists bring boxes full of groceries to France because they don't want to pay French prices, and some expats buy white goods etc from the UK ditto. We want it all, the widescreen TV and the new car every 3 years etc etc etc, so we 'need' everything to be cheap.

But you are right hils, you could also call it an unfair advantage and it's the same old problem, UK business models don't work in France. (Sinks even deeper into depression.)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
I'm not sold on that argument, but I accept there may be some validity ... it's just I'd rather see my daughter and her pals in jobs here, than see those jobs taken by UK kids, just to benefit UK families, at the expense of France. And as for what constitutes "need", there may have to be some rethinking done - at the mo., in the Philippines, the REAL need is for water, food, shelter and hygienic sanitary facilities for EVERYone, not just those who were already in poverty; kind of puts our "needs" into a bit of perspective, doesn't it?

Good Lord: am getting more French Nationalistic than the French themselves - lol

hils
(PS re depression: have just heard you can't say "bubble" without it uplifting you - apparently; I can, but then I'm not normal :D)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Xrac

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,289 Posts
I'm not sold on that argument, but I accept there may be some validity ... it's just I'd rather see my daughter and her pals in jobs here, than see those jobs taken by UK kids, just to benefit UK families, at the expense of France.
Can't fault the logic - if these UK companies could afford to employ kids 'in France', which they can't, not if they have to stay competitive in the UK marketplace. So it's jobs for UK kids or jobs for nobody, and I hate situations that don't have any winners, only losers.

Bubble bubble bubble. Oddly enough it does actually make me smile ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
Bubble bubble bubble. Oddly enough it does actually make me smile ;)
Good; that's my good deed for the day then; that's uplifting in itself ;)

Don't think it did much for the 3 Old Crones tho'.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EuroTrash

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Campsite courier with the companies I mentioned or others that operate the same way: you do a week's training in the UK around March, then you go out to your campsite in France or wherever, you can choose where you go up to a point. Your fares there and back are arranged for you and paid for and you have accommodation provided, usually a tent sometimes shared, and sometimes meals provided too. Depending on what position you get you might spend a lot of time cleaning, entertaining kiddies, whatever. The pay is peanuts but the best thing about it is the chance live in a great place with the basics provided and working with a team of like-minded people who are all there to work hard but most of all to have a good time. You don't save much but it can be the experience of a lifetime. Probably my best season was in Hérault, from April to September I lived in a tent right next to a vineyard and I watched the vines grow from tiny twigs to a lush harvest, woke up every morning listening to the crickets, explored the area, spent days on beaches on the Med, visited Nimes, Pont du Gard, the mountains, so many great memories, I wouldn't have missed it for the world.
Sounds amazing, you paint a very good picture of it. I don't really mind not saving, tbh what I am looking for is the experience too so something like that sounds brilliant. To experience a new place, do new things and meet like minded people.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top