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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all you lucky dogs,

I am on my way to Crete....2 months tops! I have been researching and gathering all kinds of info...on the market of ESL teachers. (English as a Second Language), seems there are many schools in Greece looking for good teachers..

They, my commrades tell me the best way to find a position is to show UP!!!!! So I wil be doing a little dance finding the right school and living situation. It all takes time..I have it and want to enjoy the process, I will be there a long time!

.But I do know "Leap and the Net will appear." I have done this before!!!!

Anybody know or anybody reading this thread teachEnglish in Greece????

Or any Language schools they think I HAVE to check out.\\

I thank you ahead and look for you reply's...enjoy the off season.

Best
fabienne
 

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Hey all you lucky dogs,

I am on my way to Crete....2 months tops! I have been researching and gathering all kinds of info...on the market of ESL teachers. (English as a Second Language), seems there are many schools in Greece looking for good teachers..

They, my commrades tell me the best way to find a position is to show UP!!!!! So I wil be doing a little dance finding the right school and living situation. It all takes time..I have it and want to enjoy the process, I will be there a long time!

.But I do know "Leap and the Net will appear." I have done this before!!!!

Anybody know or anybody reading this thread teachEnglish in Greece????

Or any Language schools they think I HAVE to check out.\\

I thank you ahead and look for you reply's...enjoy the off season.

Best
fabienne
I have not moved to Greece yet. I am also an ESL teacher. Currently I'm in NY, but will be moving near Korinthos in the summer. I hope to find an EFL job there. Did you read up on working permits/residence permits? Are you an EU citizen? There are Greek laws for highering non-Greek citizens. Not sure if this is true, but I heard that they will hire you to teach, but title you administrative and pay you in cash. This could affect your health insurance and/or retirement. I'm really new at all of this and have not done it myself yet. This is just what I've heard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi ...

Thanks for replying...
I have read up on all the "red tape" ...and do not think that is a reason to hold back.

Hoping you are as filled with the vision and excitement as I am....I am thrilled to be making the leap. Listen I have done this before. I up and moved to San Miguel de Allende in the central mountains of Mexico for a teaching position and stayed 8 years....it was the most fulfilling and and courageous thing I have done and set me on my path to do it again and KNOW, the people you meet, the places you stay, the connections they are all there waiting for us. I know it...if this is your vision.

Just be open and expect the very best.

Any body else teaching in or on their way to Greece.
I am also a Yoga Teacher and have held many retreats in Mexico and the US...and hope to find a great studio to pick up a class to teach and to take....

It is all in the works.

So don't be shy please reply and reel me in!!!!

Just think guy's NO MORE SNOW!!!!

Ahimsa
fabienne








I have not moved to Greece yet. I am also an ESL teacher. Currently I'm in NY, but will be moving near Korinthos in the summer. I hope to find an EFL job there. Did you read up on working permits/residence permits? Are you an EU citizen? There are Greek laws for highering non-Greek citizens. Not sure if this is true, but I heard that they will hire you to teach, but title you administrative and pay you in cash. This could affect your health insurance and/or retirement. I'm really new at all of this and have not done it myself yet. This is just what I've heard.
 

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Hi ...

Thanks for replying...
I have read up on all the "red tape" ...and do not think that is a reason to hold back.

Hoping you are as filled with the vision and excitement as I am....I am thrilled to be making the leap. Listen I have done this before. I up and moved to San Miguel de Allende in the central mountains of Mexico for a teaching position and stayed 8 years....it was the most fulfilling and and courageous thing I have done and set me on my path to do it again and KNOW, the people you meet, the places you stay, the connections they are all there waiting for us. I know it...if this is your vision.

Just be open and expect the very best.

Any body else teaching in or on their way to Greece.
I am also a Yoga Teacher and have held many retreats in Mexico and the US...and hope to find a great studio to pick up a class to teach and to take....

It is all in the works.

So don't be shy please reply and reel me in!!!!

Just think guy's NO MORE SNOW!!!!

Ahimsa
fabienne

I wish I had some of your confidence. My husband is moving over there first. All of his family lives there. I have never taught a formal class overseas. This will definitely be an adventure. In the past I have moved around a lot, but only in the US. Btw, Yoga is my new hobbie. Too bad you weren't planning on moving to the mainland. I would probably take a class from you.
 

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I've been through the process of getting a special work permit as an American citizen (NO Greek background!) in Greece and it is very, very complex BUT it can be done. If you have questions about the process, feel free to ask. I am a very strong believer in doing everything legally, because as a guest in this country the least we can do is respect the laws, right? (And also the punishment for overstaying a visa or working on a tourist visa can be exile, and who wants that?) However, working legally as an American in Greece does involve a lot of preparation and paperwork. It can be overwhelming and it's good to have someone to ask, so if you don't have your work permit yet, and have questions, feel free to ask. Also make sure you leave at least a few months for all the paperwork to go through before you leave for Greece, the FBI stuff alone can take a month to six weeks, and it can be hard to get it rushed through, and HUGE STRESS you don't need before taking a massive life-changing step ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've been through the process of getting a special work permit as an American citizen (NO Greek background!) in Greece and it is very, very complex BUT it can be done. If you have questions about the process, feel free to ask. I am a very strong believer in doing everything legally, because as a guest in this country the least we can do is respect the laws, right? (And also the punishment for overstaying a visa or working on a tourist visa can be exile, and who wants that?) However, working legally as an American in Greece does involve a lot of preparation and paperwork. It can be overwhelming and it's good to have someone to ask, so if you don't have your work permit yet, and have questions, feel free to ask. Also make sure you leave at least a few months for all the paperwork to go through before you leave for Greece, the FBI stuff alone can take a month to six weeks, and it can be hard to get it rushed through, and HUGE STRESS you don't need before taking a massive life-changing step ;)
Hi..thanks for the heads-up...I HEAR you and appreciate your info.

What do you do in Greece....I think as in Mexico the Geeks gov. doesn't want foreigners taking jobs that Greeks can do.......

I know there are many people who go to Greece and become bartenders and similar jobs.

I am going to start my journey in Dec. tell me what kinds of paperwork I need to being with and how much the process costs.

Thank you,
fabienne
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Come on you guys...
there must be a ESL teacher reading our thread or someone who knows a teacher or school they near them!!!...or a yoga teacher... I know there is much yoga in Greece....

love to hear from you.
fabienne
 

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Hi Fabienne,

The paperwork that I had to have (and it does depend on the individual because depending on which law covers your specific area/career, it can vary) was:

- a completed Schengen visa application with photo (bear in mind that as American citizens, we never usually have to fill these out, BUT for a work visa, they just use this application anyway because they haven't come up with a separate one)

- complete health insurance including repatriation (standard is around $100,000 for medical and $250,000 for repatriation), with a specific letter from your insurance company stating that you are covered in Greece and in what amounts - and be sure that you get TWO original copies because you will need one in the USA and one once you get to Greece. The letter can be in English at this point.

- a letter from your bank stating that you have savings capable of covering you at (I believe) $30/day for the length of your stay (yes, even for a work permit). It is fine if this comes from more than one bank, or multiple accounts. You can use CDs and investment accounts for this also.

- most recent statement from the above accounts. Be prepared for them to keep the originals so make a copy so you don't lose these.

- a complete physical and a letter from a physician from the same date as the physical, confirming that you have no communicable diseases and are in good health. This should be from within a few weeks before you go to your interview because they don't like it if it's from a long time ago, for obvious reasons.

- a letter from your employer in Greece stating what your salary will be, and where you will be working and for how long. This should be on official letterhead (they love official letterhead at the Embassy!)

- a letter from your landlord in Greece stating where you will be living and for how long, with the actual address.

- your American passport that is valid for at least 3 months after the date that you will depart from Greece at the end of your stay. It must have at least 3 blank pages.

- fingerprint cards that have been vetted by the FBI and come back as "No Record Found" from their Criminal Background Check division (this is the one that can take up to 6 weeks). You can get the fingerprints done usually at the main police station in your town. Don't bother getting the background check done through the state police, they only want the FBI.

- something like $75.00 or thereabouts in cash.

- a face-to-face interview with a consular agent in the Embassy of Greece in Washington, DC -OR- at the Greek Consulate in your area. You have to find out which one, you can't just show up to any one of them. Depending on which state you live in, you are in a particular jurisdiction. You have to make sure you go to the right one! In some cases, you will have to fly there, like if you live in Arizona you might have to fly to San Francisco or something.

All of the above is BEFORE you leave for Greece. Once you have your interview, they keep you passport so don't expect to use it in the next few days. I've only ever dealt with the Embassy in Washington, DC, which is extremely fast (3-4 days) at getting the passport back to you. You can either go and pick it up yourself, or they will mail it to you if you provide them with a pre-paid, addressed, insured Priority Mailer (which runs about $18).

All you will have gotten out of this is a *single-entry Schengen Visa* placed inside your passport. However, they will NOT issue a residence permit if you don't have this!!! They are very strict about this. Despite the fact that Americans usually consider themselves to have a Schengen visa by the simple fact of carrying their passport, they do it for OTHER reasons, and you have to go through this process. The Schengen visa in your passport is only valid for about 90 days, usually a few days less than that in reality.

As soon as you arrive in Greece, you have to do the following:

- take your health insurance letter to be officially translated into Greek. They will not accept it otherwise. You can do this in Athens.

- you will need a bunch of passport sized photos.

- go to a state hospital (you will have to find out which one it is, and what days, at what hours! it's not just any hospital!) to have a chest X-ray and a mantoux test done. You then have to go back a few days later to have the mantoux test read, and to pick up your X-ray. They will give you a form that you have to keep for your residence permit application.

- there is a new residence permit application that came out a few weeks ago. You will need to fill it out. You should be able to get it from the Ministry of the Interior in Athens, or possibly from any KEP (Citizens Services Center). Whenever you go to the Ministry of the Interior, bear in mind it can take several hours just to see someone. KEP would be much easier if they have it.

- once you have your translated health letter, your hospital form saying you are clean, and your filled-out application with passport photos, take all of it and your passport back to the Ministry of the Interior where you will submit it. They will give you a blue piece of paper that states that you have filled out the application and it is now being considered. You have to pay something for this (employers sometimes pay for it, as mine did, so I don't know the exact amount, a few hundred euros anyway).

Keep that blue piece of paper. It's not an actual residence permit, just proof that you applied. You can't leave Greece until your *actual* permit is in your hands!! So don't plan to travel to other countries, even in the EU, until at least a few months have gone by, as it does take several months for the permit to come through.

Well, that's all I can think of right now.... I hope I covered everything, I'm sorry if I didn't, but please please please understand that I am ONLY writing this from PERSONAL EXPERIENCE and your requirements may be different and I am NOT a lawyer or an expert under ANY circumstances, read at your own risk, et cetera et cetera.... I only intend it as a general guide and not as instructions. With that in mind, I wish you the best of luck!!!!
 

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Thank you, wka, for that detailed description of the process. One thing that may have gotten lost is the fact that you need an offer of employment before you can file for the visa.

>>- a letter from your employer in Greece stating what your salary will be, and where you will be working and for how long. This should be on official letterhead (they love official letterhead at the Embassy!)<<

This is becoming pretty much standard operating practice in many countries of the EU. Other EU nationals can just move to Greece and try their luck, but those of us from outside the EU have to get job and lodging resolved ahead of time.

You may want to look into making a surveillance run to Greece to contact language schools and ask them about the availability of teaching positions. Heck, you might even come away with a job offer, and then on your return to the States, you can start the visa process.

BTW, do you speak Greek? That can be a big factor in finding a job.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I live and work in Greece. I'm a British citizen so can legally work (and look for work) anywhere in the EU. When I first came here I did think I might teach English and took a distance learning course in teaching EFL. However, I never found a suitable position so ended up running a business with my partner.

The course did wonders for my own knowledge of my language, however!

I think there are opportunities but the pay is pretty poor until you can get private students as well.

Greek parents are extremely keen for their children to speak languages. English, German and French are taught at private language schools, 'frontisteria'. You'll find many of these in every town and village and they like to have at least one native speaker, if they are big enough. If you have a degree and/or teaching qualification you may not be required to speak Greek, but often you need to speak Greek to be able to teach here.

From what Americans friends tell me it can be difficult to get work permits if you are not an EU citizen. You need to find a job first. Some of them complain about 'Fortress Europe' but non Americans can't just turn up in the USA and look for a job - exactly the same constraints are put on us looking for work in your country.

I think that you need to remember that the situation here is not the same as I imagine it is in South American countries, for instance.

Greece is a modern European country with highly educated young people, many of whom speak several languages and have been to university elsewhere in Europe or the USA.

On the island I live on many of the English language teachers are British women who married Greek men they met on holiday! They have settled here, raise families, and speak both English and Greek. They are often happy to work part-time for a frontisteria. I think Crete may be the same. If you go to a more remote, less touristy area, you would not find this to the same extent I think.

There are also a lot of 'returned Greeks' from the USA, Australia, S. Africa etc. Thousands left the country after the war when people here were starving but some have now returned with their families bringing new ideas and language skills into the country. They get special tax breaks to help them move back.

You will be competing for work against other people who have the advantage of speaking the same language as their students, so you need to offer something more. Just being a native speaker may not be enough. Having good experience and relevant qualifications should help you towards your dream.

It is possible to work here but you should try to find a job first if you are not an EU citizen and I also suggest you learn some Greek.

There are companies that assist in finding posts for EFL teachers - why don't you contact one of them?

Coming on a reconnaisse visit as suggested above is also a good idea. Greece operates largely on 'who you know' as well, so if you have any contacts in Crete I would get them to arrange meetings for you with people running language schools there. It will work better than if you turn up unknown to them.
 

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Welcome to Crete

What part of Crete do you intend to settle in, I live and rent long term very near to Chania. There is a very small English community nearby spread out amongst the Greeks. Find your way to Aptera about 10km outside Chania along the main highway towards Rethinmo, 1 km towards Aptera there is small village, just after to small super market on the right stop and go into the Cretan Corner Taverna and introduce yourself to Sue the owner and get onto the newsletter email list, she provides Greek lessons, talks by local Brits during the summer, Greek dancing lessons, computer courses and other things.

Not sure about your ability to teach English in Crete, there are allot of small business providing this service so there is allot of competition and allot of English teachers around, anyway best of luck, the west of the Island is the most beautiful so head for that side if you have not made your mind up.

Stephen
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What part of Crete do you intend to settle in, I live and rent long term very near to Chania. There is a very small English community nearby spread out amongst the Greeks. Find your way to Aptera about 10km outside Chania along the main highway towards Rethinmo, 1 km towards Aptera there is small village, just after to small super market on the right stop and go into the Cretan Corner Taverna and introduce yourself to Sue the owner and get onto the newsletter email list, she provides Greek lessons, talks by local Brits during the summer, Greek dancing lessons, computer courses and other things.

Not sure about your ability to teach English in Crete, there are allot of small business providing this service so there is allot of competition and allot of English teachers around, anyway best of luck, the west of the Island is the most beautiful so head for that side if you have not made your mind up.

Stephen
Hi Stephen,

So glad to get you mail this am...it is the first one I feel resonates with what I am envisioning for myself. I will be heading out a little later that planned and will definitely visit Sue and make friends....get the poop so to speak... I will hang around the West side for while and drink it in.. any suggestions on a room or digs. I will also try to find you. I have heard the WEST side of the island is the most beautiful!!!!!
Fabienne stay in touch be there in Feb...2010
 
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