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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everybody,
yesterday I found out that there is only one organic butchery in all of the 7 Canary islands and that is in El Hierro, El Pinar. Food is very important for me and the problem is that I can't find any apartments there so the 2 questions I have are:
1) Are there any affordable apartments there that you can easily rent, preferably in the south?
2) If not, is it possible to order that meat or somehow buy it on a different island? There must be some shipping going on to the other islands if it's the only organic meat available.

Thanks in advance for any info.
 

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We have a member from El Hierro...... not heard from him for a while:confused:

Fingers crossed he'll pop on and answer you
 

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We have a member from El Hierro...... not heard from him for a while:confused:

Fingers crossed he'll pop on and answer you
It was Hepa, but he had to change his name in the IT kerfuffle we had a while back. Can't remember his new name...
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It might help if you give us your definition of organic meat. Do you mean raised on pastures that have not been treated with herbicides etc? Because that applies to pretty much all cerdo iberico (pork), carne de retinta (beef), and of course game (venison, partridge, wild boar and rabbit). All widely available everywhere in Spain AFAIK but not necessarily sold by specialist shops.
 

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It might help if you give us your definition of organic meat. Do you mean raised on pastures that have not been treated with herbicides etc? Because that applies to pretty much all cerdo iberico (pork), carne de retinta (beef), and of course game (venison, partridge, wild boar and rabbit). All widely available everywhere in Spain AFAIK but not necessarily sold by specialist shops.
Uhhhm, I wouldn't say that almost all beef or pork in Spain was reared in an organic way, even if they are reared in untreated pastures. Most of them are chock a block with antibiotics and worse as far as I can make out unless otherwise stated. There are a lot of half way stages though like for example chickens that are reared outside whose feed cantains at least a portion of more natural ingredients.
BTW I had never heard of carne de retininta so I looked it up and it seems it's a specific breed of cow available in the south the of Spain, in olny one butcher in Madrid and no further north than that
¿Dónde comprar? | Marca de garantía | Asociación Nacional de Criadores de Ganado Vacuno Selecto de Raza Retinta
And here at least there's no mention of how the cattle are kept or fed.

Here's a search for carne orgánica canarias
https://www.ecosia.org/search?q=carne+organica+canarias
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What I meant is no antibiotics, and more or less natural food for the animals. On El Hierro they are kept outside all year, which is ideal.
 

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Uhhhm, I wouldn't say that almost all beef or pork in Spain was reared in an organic way, even if they are reared in untreated pastures. Most of them are chock a block with antibiotics and worse as far as I can make out unless otherwise stated. There are a lot of half way stages though like for example chickens that are reared outside whose feed cantains at least a portion of more natural ingredients.
BTW I had never heard of carne de retininta so I looked it up and it seems it's a specific breed of cow available in the south the of Spain, in olny one butcher in Madrid and no further north than that
¿Dónde comprar? | Marca de garantía | Asociación Nacional de Criadores de Ganado Vacuno Selecto de Raza Retinta
And here at least there's no mention of how the cattle are kept or fed.

Here's a search for carne orgánica canarias
https://www.ecosia.org/search?q=carne+organica+canarias
I won't touch intensively-reared meat either. Not just because of the antibiotics but for animal welfare reasons.

That's why I specifically mentioned cerdo iberico, which is a type of pig that is raised out of doors, free range, grazing in the dehesas. The best comes from Huelva and Extremadura It is expensive but worth the extra. All good butchers wll sell it, as does Mercadona.

Retinta beef is a growth industry. They are hardly little beasts who can tolerate the Andalusian summers, and they spend all year out of doors. I went to an agricultural research centre the other day whether they have a breeding programme, experimenting crossing them with Limousin cattle from France, to improve the meat yield. In a few years' time I guarantee you will see the meat all over Spain.

Antibiotics are not routinely given to either of these breeds. Too expensive, apart from anything else!

Free-range chicken (pollo de campo) is surely available everywhere? I can order it from my butcher in the village. But watch out for "pollo de corral" as that can include intensively reared birds.
 

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I won't touch intensively-reared meat either. Not just because of the antibiotics but for animal welfare reasons.

That's why I specifically mentioned cerdo iberico, which is a type of pig that is raised out of doors, free range, grazing in the dehesas. The best comes from Huelva and Extremadura It is expensive but worth the extra. All good butchers wll sell it, as does Mercadona.

Retinta beef is a growth industry. They are hardly little beasts who can tolerate the Andalusian summers, and they spend all year out of doors. I went to an agricultural research centre the other day whether they have a breeding programme, experimenting crossing them with Limousin cattle from France, to improve the meat yield. In a few years' time I guarantee you will see the meat all over Spain.

Antibiotics are not routinely given to either of these breeds. Too expensive, apart from anything else!

Free-range chicken (pollo de campo) is surely available everywhere? I can order it from my butcher in the village. But watch out for "pollo de corral" as that can include intensively reared birds.
But free range isn't organic. Free range means that the birds have x amount of time with access to the outside, but their feed isn't necessarily of a different standard to battery hens
In general, free range producers feed their flocks with standard feeds such as those used in conventional battery production units and factory farms, including caged systems and barn rearing systems, the main stipulation being that such feeds at the fattening stage contain at least 70% of cereals - there are no requirements regarding the GM status of such feeds; their origin; their method of production or the type of seed used - whereas in certified organic production, all of these areas are of primary concern.
Organic encompasses the whole process, the kind of farm, the feed, the sourcing etc and free range doesn't.
I haven't heard of pollo de campo to mean free range. It seems more like de corral which as you say doesn't give any guarantees and is not a recognised classification. It just means farmyard animal and although that might mean certain things it doesn't guarantee anything. Here I see campera or criado en libertad.
 

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But free range isn't organic. Free range means that the birds have x amount of time with access to the outside, but their feed isn't necessarily of a different standard to battery hens

Organic encompasses the whole process, the kind of farm, the feed, the sourcing etc and free range doesn't.
I haven't heard of pollo de campo to mean free range. It seems more like de corral which as you say doesn't give any guarantees and is not a recognised classification. It just means farmyard animal and although that might mean certain things it doesn't guarantee anything. Here I see campera or criado en libertad.
That's why I asked the OP what he meant by organic meat, because it means different things to different people. His reply:

What I meant is no antibiotics, and more or less natural food for the animals.
Certainly the free-range birds round here (referred to locally as pollo de campo or campera) are not given antibiotics. I've no idea what they are fed on, I always assumed they get cereal-based chicken food as well as what they find grubbing around in the ground.
 
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