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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought that his speech went well, considering that he dispensed with auto-queue and guidance notes, I am certain that he did 'far better' than his predecessor. What did confuse me was his pledge to freeze energy costs if Labour win the next general election, what if they stand at an all time high at that time? I think that he knows something that we don't, it has long been mooted that wholesale energy costs have been decreasing whilst retail costs continue to rise.

I thought when I heard him talk of 'opting in,' to Labour Party membership through union subs that he might not be quite as Wallace & Gromit as he has been painted. However when I look at the opposition front bench, the one eyed man becoming king comes to mind.
 

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I thionk the acute shortage of affordable housing is his biggest challenge. If he is serious about tackling the hoarding of development land by hedge funds, and restores the role of the public sector in housing provision, he might gain my confidence. More council houses were sold under Blair than under Thatcher!
 

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I thionk the acute shortage of affordable housing is his biggest challenge. If he is serious about tackling the hoarding of development land by hedge funds, and restores the role of the public sector in housing provision, he might gain my confidence. More council houses were sold under Blair than under Thatcher!
I love stats like that. Another of my favourites is "More coal mines were closed by Labour in the '70s than Conservatives in the '80s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I thionk the acute shortage of affordable housing is his biggest challenge. If he is serious about tackling the hoarding of development land by hedge funds, and restores the role of the public sector in housing provision, he might gain my confidence. More council houses were sold under Blair than under Thatcher!
I had to go into the old industrial part of Sheffield the other day, I hadn't been in that part of the city for years. I was absolutely gob smacked by the amount of affordable housing that had sprung up on what was ex industrial brown field sites. Most statistics appear to come from London and the south east, we don't have many Battersea Power Station conversions in my neck of the woods.
 

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I had to go into the old industrial part of Sheffield the other day, I hadn't been in that part of the city for years. I was absolutely gob smacked by the amount of affordable housing that had sprung up on what was ex industrial brown field sites. Most statistics appear to come from London and the south east, we don't have many Battersea Power Station conversions in my neck of the woods.
Sheffield always did lead the way in that respect. Back in the 70s when I was studying urban planning we went there on a field trip because their public housing and transport systems were exemplary.

Has the new stuff been built by Sheffield council or private developers? Or some sort of collaboration?
 

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I thionk the acute shortage of affordable housing is his biggest challenge. If he is serious about tackling the hoarding of development land by hedge funds, and restores the role of the public sector in housing provision, he might gain my confidence. More council houses were sold under Blair than under Thatcher!
And fewer built than under Thatcher. The public sector plays a major role in providing affordable housing still, it's just been stasrved of cash for far too long.

Yes, the shortage of affordable housing is a major problem.But imo the most important challenge is to make into law the Living Wage and to set up a British Investment Bank with regional and local branches to fund start-ups, SMEs and basically kick-start the economy.

Not too sure about the energy price freeze. Retail energy prices are dependent on many factors, most beyond the control of any one national government. And it seems logical, if price freezes are the right way forward, to stop at energy. Why not rent price controls? Why not basic food price controls?
I'm not specifically advocating this kind of government action, although rent controls were accepted as a fair and just measure not that long ago.

Miliband the Younger is irrelevant anyway since I cannot believe the British public, or that part of it who bothers to stir itself to vote, will elect a Government led by someone they have been conditioned by the right-wing and gutter press to see as some sort of Josef Stalin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sheffield always did lead the way in that respect. Back in the 70s when I was studying urban planning we went there on a field trip because their public housing and transport systems were exemplary.

Has the new stuff been built by Sheffield council or private developers? Or some sort of collaboration?
Now there you have me, I haven't a clue.

This was within walking distance of The Don Valley Stadium, that a plan to run it free of any charge to Sheffield, has just been declined, I wager that housing will eventually occupy the site.
 

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Sheffield always did lead the way in that respect. Back in the 70s when I was studying urban planning we went there on a field trip because their public housing and transport systems were exemplary.

Has the new stuff been built by Sheffield council or private developers? Or some sort of collaboration?
Thanks due to David Blunkett and the Sheffield Labour Group!! Although of course the bill when it landed on the doormat led to steep Council Tax rises for residents.

LAs are now of course less direct providers of social housing than 'strategic allocators'. They are still responsible for some categories of the homeless and send families off to often dreadful temporary B&B accommodation but that's all. I don't know what percentage of social housing is still under direct LA control but I'm guessing a very small one indeed.

I seem to remember, way back in 2007, Gordon Brown promised six thousand affordable homes. The Coalition is subsidising via we taxpayers the purchase of homes up to the value of £600k, including, I believe, second homes.
Says it all.
 
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