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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello new forum friends:

My first post!...

I'm a U.S. citizen currently living in the U.S., but have recently gotten official "recognition" of Italian citizenship also (through an interesting Italian law that recognizes that some descendants of some Italian emigrants, in some circumstances, are actually also Italian citizens).

My wife and I plan to move to Paris in a couple of years (I lived there 9 years as a teenager), taking advantage of my new Italian (and therefore E.U.) citizenship to be able to live and potentially work there.

I'm looking forward to future conversations on this helpful forum, as we figure out how to put this expat plan into place.
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum.

First of all, be sure to get your Italian passport. It will come in handy - and if you leave it to the last minute, something will come up that will delay its issuance just when you need it.

Once you have that, you can start making serious plans for moving to France (or elsewhere).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Bev:

Thanks for the welcome.

"I'm on it", as they say over on this side of the pond. (I don't know how long you've been an expat, nor how long that expression has been part of the lingo in the U.S.) I have an appointment to get my Italian passport in the next few weeks.

It was a *very* long process (over 2 years) of waiting for my "recognition application" appointment at the Italian consulate, and of collecting the 26 (!!) different documents I needed to have in hand to prove my link back to my Italian ancestor who emigrated to the U.S., as well as to prove that I am me. So, I'm very much looking forward to having my Italian passport in hand, to have concrete "tactile" proof of my dual citizenship. (I already have the "recognition letter", but a passport will somehow make it more "real.")

In the meantime the fantasy continues to unfold in our minds of how we will "make the jump" in a couple of years. After living in France for 9 years as a teenager, it has been a dream to move back one day. So, when I discovered a few years ago (somewhat by accident) that I was eligible for dual citizenship, it opened up an exciting pathway to fulfill that dream -- which my partner (wife) fortunately shares.

- Gregoire
 
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