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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading a few of the posts on here, I too am curious about what my daughter and I should expect or could expect at the airport.

My story in brief....I hold Canadian and Dutch passports, having just received my dutch passport, and my daughter and I are moving to England this July. We will be living with my British partner. We are moving over for at least a year, depends on how we all adjust. I am a teacher and have made contacts with a few agencies so I am hoping work will not be a problem for me. Not sure what immigration will ask us...how much money will they expect I have....can someone give me some guidance please.

Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Use your Dutch passport to enter Britain, and you may avoid any heavy duty questioning.
Cheers,
Bev
Right, I will use my Dutch passport, but will they not ask why I am coming from Canada. When I go to England I always have a return ticket, this time I won't. Will they not ask us, how long we are staying, they usually do.
 

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Right, I will use my Dutch passport, but will they not ask why I am coming from Canada. When I go to England I always have a return ticket, this time I won't. Will they not ask us, how long we are staying, they usually do.
It's totally different for EU citizen. As a Dutch citizen you have the right to stay and work in UK as long as you want, whereas a Canadian has to be given leave or permission by the Border Agency (Home Office) even to visit UK. There is nothing to question, as they can't prevent you from entering - except if you are on terrorist watch list or something!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's totally different for EU citizen. As a Dutch citizen you have the right to stay and work in UK as long as you want, whereas a Canadian has to be given leave or permission by the Border Agency (Home Office) even to visit UK. There is nothing to question, as they can't prevent you from entering - except if you are on terrorist watch list or something!
Okay, great, thanks for the reply, I feel a lot more confident.

Thank you,

Till next time I have a question
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's totally different for EU citizen. As a Dutch citizen you have the right to stay and work in UK as long as you want, whereas a Canadian has to be given leave or permission by the Border Agency (Home Office) even to visit UK. There is nothing to question, as they can't prevent you from entering - except if you are on terrorist watch list or something!
Will I have to fill out a landing card?
 

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So I am thinking I also don't have to prove that I have lots of money set aside either then?
No. As an EU citizen, goint to UK is almost like entering your own country - you have (nearly) as much right as British citizen. So all that the immigration officer is interested in is that your document is genuine (by examining for tampering, and scanning it to see if you are on any immigration watch list), and you are who it says you are. Takes about 5 seconds!

I am a teacher and have made contacts with a few agencies so I am hoping work will not be a problem for me.
If you have Canadian teaching qualification, remember it isn't recognised as equal to British qualification (QTS - qualified teacher status), without going through an assessment process on an overseas trained teacher programme (OTTP). It requires creating a portfolio of evidence and having your lessons observed to show you meet the standards laid down. Takes a year while working as unqualified teacher in school. General Teaching Council (professional body for teachers in England) allows you to remain unqualified for 4 years before having to gain QTS. Not having QTS may make it more difficult to get supply (substitute) teaching post. And supply work itself is declining because of oversupply of teachers in most areas and in many subjects. This is particularly so for primary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No. As an EU citizen, goint to UK is almost like entering your own country - you have (nearly) as much right as British citizen. So all that the immigration officer is interested in is that your document is genuine (by examining for tampering, and scanning it to see if you are on any immigration watch list), and you are who it says you are. Takes about 5 seconds!



If you have Canadian teaching qualification, remember it isn't recognised as equal to British qualification (QTS - qualified teacher status), without going through an assessment process on an overseas trained teacher programme (OTTP). It requires creating a portfolio of evidence and having your lessons observed to show you meet the standards laid down. Takes a year while working as unqualified teacher in school. General Teaching Council (professional body for teachers in England) allows you to remain unqualified for 4 years before having to gain QTS. Not having QTS may make it more difficult to get supply (substitute) teaching post. And supply work itself is declining because of oversupply of teachers in most areas and in many subjects. This is particularly so for primary.
Right, I am aware of my teaching qualifications, and I do fear that there is an oversupply of teachers. Agencies say there is not, but I have done some research to indicate that teachers are no longer on the short list.
 

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Right, I am aware of my teaching qualifications, and I do fear that there is an oversupply of teachers. Agencies say there is not, but I have done some research to indicate that teachers are no longer on the short list.
Only Secondary Maths and Pure Science teachers are on shortage list of occupations, meaning a school doesn't need to show shortage of applicants in order to sponsor an overseas teacher for a work visa. There has been a big influx of career-changers into teaching in the last few years, and others returning to profession after losing their non-teaching jobs in recession. The number applying for teacher training has more than doubled since 2007. There are many recently qualified and experienced teachers unable to get a job. While the London area still seems to have a fair amount of supply work, it can be dire the further away you go. In the North and West generally, it is truly awful. Also schools are downsizing in response to fall in pupil numbers by not replacing staff who leave, amalgamating classes, cutting subjects offered and allowing cheaper non-qualified staff (such as teaching assistants and cover supervisors) to take classes. All this makes supply (non-permanent) teaching a rather precarious way of making a living, and many supply teachers wait in vain every morning for the phone to ring. One advantage you may have is that as unqualified teacher (to start with), you are cheaper than more experienced qualified teacher. If you have your salary scale point in UK (such as M1, M3, M5 etc), you are entitled to get paid at least 1/190 of your yearly salary for one day of supply. So for a typical experienced classroom teacher on £30,000 a year, they can earn around £158 (before tax) a day. You, on the other hand, are only entitled to 2/3 of equivalent salary as unqualified teacher.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
We will try for a year or so, if we find that it is too difficult as far as making ends meet then we move back to Canada, and my partner will join us here when he is able to. I would be happy with 3 days supply work a week, and quite prepared to do any other job. I know the job market is dismal...but my partner and I have lived across the ocean for too long.
 

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We will try for a year or so, if we find that it is too difficult as far as making ends meet then we move back to Canada, and my partner will join us here when he is able to. I would be happy with 3 days supply work a week, and quite prepared to do any other job. I know the job market is dismal...but my partner and I have lived across the ocean for too long.
That's good, and gives you more options to make it work. In the current climate, you need the 'can do' attitude and not be frightened of set-backs. There are jobs available for those who seek, and you may only need to find one job offer in spite of competitions.
Best of luck.
 

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Right, I will use my Dutch passport, but will they not ask why I am coming from Canada. When I go to England I always have a return ticket, this time I won't. Will they not ask us, how long we are staying, they usually do.
As an EU national, you have every right to settle in the UK including the right to work. As a Canadian citizen, you don't. When you arrive, look for the line for "EU nationals" and zip right through. (Actually, to use the EU line, you don't even need a passport, just a valid EU national identity card - though you need the passport to board the plane coming from Canada.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That's good, and gives you more options to make it work. In the current climate, you need the 'can do' attitude and not be frightened of set-backs. There are jobs available for those who seek, and you may only need to find one job offer in spite of competitions.
Best of luck.
Thank you again for your reply, they have been very helpful. I know the move is not an easy thing to do, but I am optimistic...
 
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