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Hi All,

(I apologize if this is a frequent question here, but I searched already as best I could but was unable to find the correct information on this forum...)

I have been living in the States now for 3 years + and I am married to a US citizen (for 7 years now!) So, I am thus eligible to apply for US citizenship.

However, I do not want to give up my Irish citizenship, so I am trying to find out how to go about / research the process of becoming a dual citizen of both the US and Ireland.

Pretty much all the info online appears to be about US citizens becoming dual citizens of Ireland, rather than the other way around. So, can someone perhaps give me some definitive guidance here - as in, is it possible for me to become a citizen of the US, while retaining my Irish passport? And, if so, how do I begin the process (which I assume takes years...!)

Many, many thanks indeed. :)

T
 

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Hi All,

(I apologize if this is a frequent question here, but I searched already as best I could but was unable to find the correct information on this forum...)

I have been living in the States now for 3 years + and I am married to a US citizen (for 7 years now!) So, I am thus eligible to apply for US citizenship.

However, I do not want to give up my Irish citizenship, so I am trying to find out how to go about / research the process of becoming a dual citizen of both the US and Ireland.

Pretty much all the info online appears to be about US citizens becoming dual citizens of Ireland, rather than the other way around. So, can someone perhaps give me some definitive guidance here - as in, is it possible for me to become a citizen of the US, while retaining my Irish passport? And, if so, how do I begin the process (which I assume takes years...!)

Many, many thanks indeed. :)

T
The US does not require that you give up your original citizenship to become an American citizen.

The process takes about 6 months on average. Some have acquired US citizenship in as little as 3 months.

You apply on Form N400
 

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The US does not require that you give up your original citizenship to become an American citizen.

The process takes about 6 months on average. Some have acquired US citizenship in as little as 3 months.

You apply on Form N400
The US does not recognize dual citizenship. Read the Pledge of Allegiance. Some states require prior approval to retain citizenship. Have you contacted the Irish Embassy closest to you?
 

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Read the question in this post which starts with " I am an Irish/EU citizen, do I automatically gain US citizenship if I marry a US citizen"

It goes on to tell you that your immigrant status to the US is the first step in gaining citizenship:

Visa FAQs | Embassy of the United States Dublin, Ireland


While the US does not, officially, recognise dual citizenship it neither takes a legal nor political view on people taking dual citizenship.

Unless the original home country has anything specific in law which says that you cannot take out dual citizenship, you can become a US citizen without losing your original citizenship.

Thousands of Brits and Irish do it every month.

Read this for more info:

Dual Citizens in America: An Issue of Vast Proportions and Broad Significance | Center for Immigration Studies


Don't know what State you are residing in, and have never heard of the prior approval requirement, but you might like to check it out.
 
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