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An interesting tale from Hotel Molino del santo newsletter re. drought in some parts of Spain.
villages that were flooded when dams were built are now being revealed again, at least for a few weeks before the expected autumnal rains. One such is the lost village of Peñarrubia, usually submerged beneath the waters of the Guadalhorce dams near to El Chorro and The Caminito del Rey.
One inhabitant of the village, 66year old Juan Moro, remembers when the village was flooded in 1973 and that the male inhabitants were each given 100,000 pesetas by the government to help with relocation, an amount which equates to about 10000euros today. That women were given just 60,000pesetas, (6000 euros today) indicates that this was in the Franco era. The receding waters have revealed the homesof 1751 people, some of them dating from medieval times along with roman ruins. A “romeria” is held every five years to reunite the displaced inhabitants and this year it is estimated that they will be able to reach the centre of the lost village with a statue of the Virgin of Rosario – the patron saint of the village before the dam was built. Juan comments that “Most people lose their parents with time but I have also lost my village, my roots, my origins. I miss them so much.”
 

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An interesting tale from Hotel Molino del santo newsletter re. drought in some parts of Spain.
villages that were flooded when dams were built are now being revealed again, at least for a few weeks before the expected autumnal rains. One such is the lost village of Peñarrubia, usually submerged beneath the waters of the Guadalhorce dams near to El Chorro and The Caminito del Rey.
One inhabitant of the village, 66year old Juan Moro, remembers when the village was flooded in 1973 and that the male inhabitants were each given 100,000 pesetas by the government to help with relocation, an amount which equates to about 10000euros today. That women were given just 60,000pesetas, (6000 euros today) indicates that this was in the Franco era. The receding waters have revealed the homesof 1751 people, some of them dating from medieval times along with roman ruins. A “romeria” is held every five years to reunite the displaced inhabitants and this year it is estimated that they will be able to reach the centre of the lost village with a statue of the Virgin of Rosario – the patron saint of the village before the dam was built. Juan comments that “Most people lose their parents with time but I have also lost my village, my roots, my origins. I miss them so much.”
Yes, many reservoirs were made in Franco's era, but without them we'd be lost in today's climate! My husband says Franco inaugurated a dam a week...Little bit of an exaggeration I think, but still, the problem was tackled full on. The news shown in cinemas in those times was called No Do and here's Franco opening one of many
 

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We live in the Castille de Lyon and have been badly affected with no rain. However it seems the farmers can irrigate freely sucking the river Duero very low and onbly recently was there an outcry. It seems there is no licencing in place for an water extraction permit, yet the local juntas get very excited if an iberian oak is chopped down. Fair enough however it seems sad that rivers can be drained in order to produce morew sugar beet at the behest of all else and those others which depend on the river systems.
 
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