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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don't you just love it,when you discover a scam artist with less brainpower than 3 day old bread? Allow me to explain....My 1st brush with this scam was way back around1997-98 and even then I was suspicious of the mail. Why? well, I didn't have any money in that bank,so whenI got this e-mail a few days ago, I was a little surprised...especially after I had replied to several previous ones saying that I did not bank with the bank they claimed to represent and any funds they had,which they thought were mine would be gladly accepted regardless of how long the temporary hold would be and could we please arrange for the cash transfer to be done in the presence of a Police officer.



Lloyds TSB

Dear Valued Customer

We believe that Invention of security measures is the best way to beat online fraud.
Lloyds TSB Bank have employed some industrial leading models to start performing an extra
security check with Your Online Banking Activities to ensure a safe and secure Online Banking.

You are requested to follow the provided steps and Update Your Online
Banking details, for the safety of Your Accounts by DOWNLOAD the attached
form and follow the instructions on your screen. If you choose to ignore our request,
you leave us no choice but to temporary hold on your funds.

Thanks you for your patience as we work together to protect your account.

Sincerely,
Lloyds TSB Online Bank Customer Service.

undefined

Important:
Please update your records on or before 48 hours, a failure to update your records will result in a temporary hold on your funds.

© 2013 Lloyds Bank plc . All rights reserved.


:painkiller: Banks never ask for this type of information in this way and the scammer thinking that people will fall for a trick nearly 20 years old proves they are thicker than the intended victim....
 

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It is so badly written it is amazing that anybody could ever fall for it...
 

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Hi - I think you came up with a brilliant response - which I'm noting, in case of any such scams being directed at myself, in future - thank you! BTW, I heard something about such scams on a recent radio programme - the British Police are keen to follow up on any emails of this kind - the Fraud Squad works with other similar agencies, internationally, to try to catch these scammers/thieves/bxxxxxxs and imprison them! Have you forwarded these emails to the Police?

Re. the other post on this thread which makes the point that your particular example is obviously a scam - I've been spending time with my elderly mother (now 89) and her friends) and have been appalled to discover that their susceptibility to fraudulent activity designed to gain access to their homes, bank accounts, credit cards and personal info. is much worse than even I had feared!

Most of this particular group are not online, but others just like them will be. IMO, there's not nearly enough protection for vulnerable people who, like my mother, are unable to recognise and resist, entirely, the 'mind- game' tactics now being employed by such thieves, whether by 'phone or at her door! The onslaught is unending and the Govt. should be doing far more to stamp it out!

I'd endorse, wholeheartedly, the right of 'phone owners to live free from the constant harassment of 'cold calling;' for people with ill-health and/or limited mobility, the noise disturbance and the effort required to get to their fixed -line handsets, each time, can cause great stress - even before they're given the hard sell!

One big problem is the use by scammers of familiar brand and company names ( 'Lloyds Bank..') for their fraud. Another is to masquerade as a genuine agency to gain the confidence of the victims and then to encourage them to' order' products (e.g. deaf/mobility aids) using their debit/credit cards!

This happened recently to my mother - luckily, I overheard part of the phone call and was able to stop her revealing her address and bank card details! She'd believed she'd been 'chosen' to participate in a 'trial' of a new TV volume enhancer from the local council's' Deaf Services' agency (she is partially deaf). She was advised that payment would only be debited from her account if she chose to keep the device, once the 'trial' was completed! In reality, she'd been subjected to a highly persuasive spiel from a disgusting thief claiming to be representing something called 'The Deaf People's Agency!'

i'd been working so hard to convince her not to respond to any such phone calls, but, as I've been learning, neither she nor her friends can be expected to discriminate correctly, every time, between genuine and dishonest 'charity collectors' who turn up at their front doors, n or to desist from responding positively, with personal info. and even their bank card details, to seemingly friendly, chatty, concerned voices on the other end of their phone lines - especially when these callers appear to' know' their victims' circumstances..!

Fortunately, my mother has since returned to her own flat in the 'Retirement Development' in which she lived, previously. There's a full-time Manager on site and a 24 hour call system to respond immediately to any alert! All residents have also been issued with 'Alert' pendants/wrist bands and there's a Security alarm on each external door! She can live her own life in her own home, but with support and assistance if required - fantastic for my family's peace of mind.

With the experience of these past months in mind, I am very concerned for the many, many vulnerable people who do not live in such secure locations and who must rely entirely on their own abilities to recognise scammers and to refuse to give them anything!

My Spanish friends cannot understand my mother's choosing to live independently from her family - despite our all having offered her other options; I can appreciate, given all I've said, above, how life in an extended family household would provide better safeguards for such elderly people. But, for some-one as fiercely independent as my own parent is, we've arrived at her preferred living arrangement. However, she's still going to be vulnerable to thieves on her 'phone line…urgggh!

Saludos,
GC
 

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It is difficult at times and I really do feel for those who just aren't up on the technology and can be classed vulnerable.
But it's hard to discriminate when you have companies that operate in exactly this way, as mentioned in another thread we refused to give our details over the phone and it resulted in our phones being blocked.
What do you do when faced with such poor business standards, best not to answer the phone at all unless you know the number.
 

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Hi - I think you came up with a brilliant response - which I'm noting, in case of any such scams being directed at myself, in future - thank you! BTW, I heard something about such scams on a recent radio programme - the British Police are keen to follow up on any emails of this kind - the Fraud Squad works with other similar agencies, internationally, to try to catch these scammers/thieves/bxxxxxxs and imprison them! Have you forwarded these emails to the Police?

Saludos,
GC
Please do not waste valuable time replying to these mails. Rest assured that any bank worth its salt will not ask for any account details by email. Nor will they send important info, like your account has been closed down, by email, unless I suppose you've asked them to.
You may feel you're getting one up on them, but the only thing you'll likely to do is to give them even more access to your computer files; info that can be sold on. Don't open them. Delete them, ignore them, don't react to them. Or tell the police or your server that you've received it if you'd like to do something about it.
I can't imagine why people would open an email that says something like "Your account has been closed down" when said person doesn't even have an account in that bank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Please do not waste valuable time replying to these mails. Rest assured that any bank worth its salt will not ask for any account details by email. Nor will they send important info, like your account has been closed down, by email, unless I suppose you've asked them to.
You may feel you're getting one up on them, but the only thing you'll likely to do is to give them even more access to your computer files; info that can be sold on. Don't open them. Delete them, ignore them, don't react to them. Or tell the police or your server that you've received it if you'd like to do something about it.
I can't imagine why people would open an email that says something like "Your account has been closed down" when said person doesn't even have an account in that bank.
The mail was titled "Important customer service news". I fail to see where sending an e-mail to someone would grant them further access to your computer files, unless you have opened and completeted any attatchments sent with the original mail and most a.v. programs will alert you if there is any malicious software in the mail. (if am I wrong about this, everyone from GCHQ to HongKong S.P.C.A. has access to sall my computer files.....well we know GCHQ, the NSA, GRU,and that little twit in the Peoples democratic republic of Korea does anyway.....side issue....why do countries with the word democratic in their name never are democratic?)

Now... as for not reporting it...why not? A crime is in progress and if it's not reported how do others get to find out it's a crime? How the authorities know the scale of the problem?

You might not fall for the scam... but others without your knowledge might
 

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All of these scams should be reported if only to the bank mentioned in the email. And it seems to me that if there are vulnerable people in someone's family they should be regularly advised on how to look out for such scams and to report anything like this to family members. On rip off Britain the other morning, a woman told her story of receiving a phone call where she was told she had won
£10,000 in a lottery she hadn't entered. She was told she had to pay £50 admin fee to release the money. She was also told she had to pay this via Ucash. Well, of course, she told them she didn't have that kind of money available so they threatened her and said they would send the police round if she didn't pay. And so on. She was very frightened and spent the morning crying. She decided that she should pay. The sad part really was that this woman had been the subject of an identical scam a year before when she had paid the money following threats and of course received nothing.

As for opening attachments; yes, a good AV programme should detect it. But something like 35% of people don't have anti-virus installed, and of those that do, many have free AV software, many of which do not automatically update so that the latest virus's have no problem infecting the user's machine.
 

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I fail to see where sending an e-mail to someone would grant them further access to your computer files, unless you have opened and completeted any attatchments sent with the original mail ...

You might not fall for the scam... but others without your knowledge might
I assumed that if you reply to the people in the mail you would have opened it.

if am I wrong about this, everyone from GCHQ to HongKong S.P.C.A. has access to sall my computer files.....well we know GCHQ, the NSA, GRU,
IMO, they probably do


Now... as for not reporting it...why not? A crime is in progress and if it's not reported how do others get to find out it's a crime? How the authorities know the scale of the problem?
See Thrax's post. Inform the bank that it's come from - it's usually in the sender or subject of the mail. If it's not there then just ignore it. If you reply directly to the sender I don't see that you achieve anything. What they want is to intereact with the people they send to, and I believe that the idea of replying to them is not good advice as that is what they want. My advice would be exactly the opposite, do not enter into contact with these people at all

You might not fall for the scam... but others without your knowledge might
There will always be some unfortunate soul who falls into the trap and they have all my sympathy, but I personally don't think replying to the senders of the mail will make any difference as you suggested in your first post, just as you will probably not change your ideas by things that you read in this thread!
 

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I believe it's important to understand the security measures banks take today.
You will never have to provide you most sensitive details in an email (!!!).
The banks websites are secure (as much as possible) and that the only way you should be running your business with the bank.
 

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Re: the e-mail scams

A lot of these occur because people are so stupid as to forward and send e-mails with everybody's email addresses on show, even those from whom one has received the e-mail in the first place. Delete all previous e-mail addresses before sending and USE BCC

If you don't know how to do this ASK!
 

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My e-mail account got hacked a year ago. I changed my password and no longer open e-mails I don't recognise.
I work on the assumption that if the communication is genuine and important the bank or whoever will ring me.
I once worked for a Headteacher who routinely swept the copious posts he received each day from County Hall into the waste bin on the same principle.
 

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On a related topic - lots of people (myself included) have been plagued by "Malware" (viruses, trojans etc) which screws up your computer in various ways. It can happen even if you have good anti-virus software. This article tells you, in plain non-techy English, some ways to avoid being "infected":

How to Avoid Malware | PCWorld
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I assumed that if you reply to the people in the mail you would have opened it.

IMO, they probably do


See Thrax's post. Inform the bank that it's come from - it's usually in the sender or subject of the mail. If it's not there then just ignore it. If you reply directly to the sender I don't see that you achieve anything. What they want is to intereact with the people they send to, and I believe that the idea of replying to them is not good advice as that is what they want. My advice would be exactly the opposite, do not enter into contact with these people at all

There will always be some unfortunate soul who falls into the trap and they have all my sympathy, but I personally don't think replying to the senders of the mail will make any difference as you suggested in your first post, just as you will probably not change your ideas by things that you read in this thread!
From what I've read in this thread.... some ideas HAVE changed and not really for the better
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
i assumed that if you reply to the people in the mail you would have opened it.


Opening the mail is probably harmless in it's own right. opening,completing and returning any attatchment is different, as you may activate a virus,spyware or malware


imo, they probably do




see thrax's post. inform the bank that it's come from -

chances are banks don't indulge in this sort of scam....why would they? They already have your banking details....

It's usually in the sender or subject of the mail. If it's not there then just ignore it. If you reply directly to the sender i don't see that you achieve anything. What they want is to intereact with the people they send to, and i believe that the idea of replying to them is not good advice as that is what they want.

totally up to you what you want to believe, but reread my post...you'll find i did not advise anyone to do anything, i merely stated what i had done in the past

my advice would be exactly the opposite, do not enter into contact with these people at all











there will always be some unfortunate soul who falls into the trap and they have all my sympathy, but i personally don't think replying to the senders of the mail will make any difference as you suggested in your first post, just as you will probably not change your ideas by things that you read in this thread!
regarding not reporting the crime, remember the words of edmund burke

"all it takes for evil to succeed is for a few good men to do nothing...”
 

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see thrax's post. inform the bank that it's come from -

Dunmovin - chances are banks don't indulge in this sort of scam....why would they? They already have your banking details....
Hahaha!
Of course the banks don't scam you; I never thought they did, nor was I suggesting that they do:)
However, if you want to inform somebody, the most interested party is the bank (or Amazon, or even Boots the chemist who are the names on some recent scam emails etc etc) from which the email is supposedly from.
 

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From time to time I receive scam emails promising me millions if I offer to help them move funds from one place to another. I was sent the best of these in early September 2011 during the war in Libya. It was so topical and made me laugh so much that decided to keep it!
"Dearest,

Peace be onto you and your family,

I am Mrs. Safia Gadhafi the wife of Muammar Gadhafi of Libya. I am presently in Algeria with my daughter Aisha and my sons.

I am sure you knows all about my family presently, I am contacting you for urgent help to secure in the name of investment in your country my family fund which NATO, UN and the Libyan transitional council have not seen. The amount involve is $80M.

Note; we are not interested on what you are going to do with this money or profit you will make from this fund rather my interest is to have the money back on demand.

If you are interested in assisting us, Your full assistance is highly needed in all participation.

Note also that your percentage for this help could be discuss.

Please forward the following information to this email address. [email protected]

(address removed!)

Full name:

Address:

Tel:/fax:

Copy of ID:

Finally don’t forget that it is a top secret therefore only email correspondence for security reasons.

Thanks for your support in advance

Mrs. Safia Gedhafi"
 

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There is a whole website dedicated to stringing these people along, while some of the back and forth is quite amusing I assume these people have even less to do with their time than I do.

Welcome to the 419 Eater

On a related topic - lots of people (myself included) have been plagued by "Malware" (viruses, trojans etc) which screws up your computer in various ways. It can happen even if you have good anti-virus software. This article tells you, in plain non-techy English, some ways to avoid being "infected":

How to Avoid Malware | PCWorld
I always recommend people to have 3 pieces of free software on their computers.

-Avast, which is your standard anti-virus and probably the best free one around.

-Malwarebytes, which is to pick up malware and other nasties.

-SuperAntiSpyware, similar to Malwarebytes but it will pick up things that the other two miss or vice versa with the other software.

These 3 will keep you mostly covered, of course you can go different routes but for the average user who just wants a simple scan and quarantine setup then this is the way to go.
The best way is to have avast run permanently in the background and once a week do a scan with all 3 pieces of software. Since using this set up my malware issues stopped.
Interestingly when I received our new PC which had Norton it leaked like a sieve.
The best piece of advice one can get is to stop using Norton.
 
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