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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm an American high school student seriously considering moving overseas to The Netherlands. I have the financial capabilities and rather than be a victim of stereotyping I am NOT moving there solely for the, with respect to America's, liberal drug policy. Their school of thought and values as a society match mine completely save for their views on Gun Control...


As my title suggests, I have absolutely no idea where to start learning about starting a career and college (What's it called over there?) education over there. I assume the education system is different and there's the whole language thing too (Fortunetly language is a forte of mine and I will start learning Dutch soon.).

What do I need to learn, where do I go to learn it? How much will it cost to move my limited amount of furniture over there? But most importantly is my US Diploma worth anything?
 

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The Netherlands have always had rather stringent immigration requirements, and they are only getting stricter these days.

You may want to approach your plan in stages - as it sounds like you're looking at doing university study in the Netherlands. It may be easier to get a student visa first, then even if you have to return to the US for a while in order to get a long-term immigrant visa, you'd still be on track.

EUROPA - Studying in the European Union is your starting point for research on the Dutch educational system (including universities). Be sure to check the Eurydice data base reports on the Dutch system Eurydice - Eurybase - Descriptions of National Education Systems and Policies | EACEA as it includes quite a bit of information on the university and tertiary education systems.

There are a number of university programs in English (very well-regarded programs, in fact), but ultimately for an immigrant visa you will need to demonstrate a fairly good level of Dutch. For general requirements for student and immigrant visas, start with the Consulate in Chicago Netherlands Consulate-General - Chicago, Illinois - Welcome

Feel free to come back to us with questions as they develop.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Yeah you could say I'm looking at doing University in The Netherlands. The only reason being is because I think that's where I want to start my life out. I see America just going to the dogs very quickly...

Learning Dutch is something I'm starting very soon. I'll need to know it just to do my research on the country, lol.

So you say that it will be hard, but not impossible, to gain Dutch citizenship then?


*Might it be a better idea to consider finishing my education in the US? Here all of my college will be paid for because of my situation. Would you think it more likely that I'll be granted citizenship with a Degree and intentions to begin a career?
 

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*Might it be a better idea to consider finishing my education in the US? Here all of my college will be paid for because of my situation. Would you think it more likely that I'll be granted citizenship with a Degree and intentions to begin a career?
No matter how you do things, the first "challenge" is simply to get a visa to live there and establish residency. You can't even apply for citizenship/nationality until you have been resident in the Netherlands for a period of time (usually at least 5 years or so).

If you finish your education in the US, then you'll have to find a job in the Netherlands to get that first visa. Depends on what you're planning on studying and what the job prospects are in that field in the Netherlands.

Getting a student visa is normally somewhat easier than getting a work visa - however, you're normally expected to go back home after you get whatever degree you're pursuing on the student visa.

It's not impossible, but it will take some time and planning on your part.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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