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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you are employed and are made redundant in Spain, how much dole (i.e. paid by the government) do you get and for how long?
 

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If you are employed and are made redundant in Spain, how much dole (i.e. paid by the government) do you get and for how long?
I think it depends for how long you were employed and how much you paid in, but I'm sure somebody on here has a complete answer
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think it depends for how long you were employed and how much you paid in, but I'm sure somebody on here has a complete answer
I guess you're right. Also - what has the company making you redundant have to give you?
 

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jimenato said:
If you are employed and are made redundant in Spain, how much dole (i.e. paid by the government) do you get and for how long?
Its 4 months dole for every year worked up to a maximum of 2 years. You will end up with around 80% of what your nomina was. The company should pay you a redundancy of 20 days per year worked (this is what the new labour reforms were about)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Its 4 months dole for every year worked up to a maximum of 2 years. You will end up with around 80% of what your nomina was. The company should pay you a redundancy of 20 days per year worked (this is what the new labour reforms were about)
So assuming a salary of 10,000 per year - and you have worked for 2 years or more, would you get paid dole for 8 months and if so at what rate?

What the company has to pay you if you have worked for say 10 years would be 200 days pay which I guess at 10,000 per year would be about 10,000 (ish) (200 (ish) working days per year).
 

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jimenato said:
So assuming a salary of 10,000 per year - and you have worked for 2 years or more, would you get paid dole for 8 months and if so at what rate?

What the company has to pay you if you have worked for say 10 years would be 200 days pay which I guess at 10,000 per year would be about 10,000 (ish) (200 (ish) working days per year).
I would say you will come away with 650-700 euros a month dole. When your dole runs out and if you have any children then you would be entitled to la ayuda familar of 429€ a month for 2 years max. After this you are on your own.

Thats right about redundancy.
 

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So assuming a salary of 10,000 per year - and you have worked for 2 years or more, would you get paid dole for 8 months and if so at what rate?

What the company has to pay you if you have worked for say 10 years would be 200 days pay which I guess at 10,000 per year would be about 10,000 (ish) (200 (ish) working days per year).
If a wage is paid monthly, there are 360 working days a year, if a daily rate is paid 365 or 366 this year! Working days by definition include paid holidays, plus your days off and legal permissions such as paternity, hospital appointments, official exams etc.
 

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Its 4 months dole for every year worked up to a maximum of 2 years. You will end up with around 80% of what your nomina was. The company should pay you a redundancy of 20 days per year worked (this is what the new labour reforms were about)


On 10 February, the government approved legislation cutting severance pay to a maximum of 33 days' salary for each year worked, compared with the current 45 days.



According to the BBC...

Even 33 days is a massive amount for some PYMES. 45 days was absurd. If a company was experiencing a downturn due to loss of orders brought about by the current economic climate and it needed to lose one worker to save the jobs of ten and keep the company solvent....if that one worker received a salary of 1200 euros a month and had work for the company for say five years, the business would have to find around 8000 euros in redundancy pay.

I think few people who aren't actually involved in running a small/medium-sized company realise how slim profit margins are. 8000 euros is a lot of money for a company employing say five people to pay out.

I've asked on another thread for realistic alternatives to making redundancies but reply there is none.:) In our own company there was no alternative to redundancy when we lost contracts or there was a decline in activity because of a depressed economy. Easy to say 'find another contract'...of course we did and sometimes we were lucky, in the face of stiff competition.

But there were an awful lot of companies chasing any contracts that happened to be up for grabs...just as there are very many people chasing job vacancies.

Life, to twist a well-known saying, is never plain and rarely simple. Certainly not black and white, workers v bosses. Not in today's economy.
 

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On 10 February, the government approved legislation cutting severance pay to a maximum of 33 days' salary for each year worked, compared with the current 45 days.
But this is only for profitable companies. If a company can show it has been running at a loss for three consecutive quarters, they will only get 20 days.

If you are in your one-year probationary period on a permanent contract, you can now be dismissed at any time with no reason given and no compensation.

Companies will also be able to reduce pay and change contracted working conditions without having to get government approval.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The reason I started the thread was that I was discussing this last night and was told that redundancy and so on is far more generous in Spain than the UK and this was one of the reasons the country was going 'down the pan'. Companies in severe difficulties can no longer afford to operate nor can they afford to make staff redundant. A result of this is that staff know they are unlikely to be made redundant which can lead to complacency (functionario syndrome?). Also because terms were so generous that there was little incentive for redundant workers to find a new job for quite some time.

I had been under the impression that there was very little help for unemployed people in Spain and much more in the UK (As you can tell I don't know very much about this subject).

To put it simply would I be right in thinking that redundancy and immediate benefits in Spain are (at least have been up until now) extremely generous - possibly to a fault but that long term assistance which you would get in the UK ("no one is allowed to starve") is practically non-existent in Spain?
 

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...........

To put it simply would I be right in thinking that redundancy and immediate benefits in Spain are (at least have been up until now) extremely generous - possibly to a fault but that long term assistance which you would get in the UK ("no one is allowed to starve") is practically non-existent in Spain?
yep!
 

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Statutory redundancy pay in the UK:

The amount of statutory redundancy pay you can get depends on a number of things. These are:

how long you've worked for your employer
your age
your weekly pay.

You have the right to:

half a week’s pay for each complete year of employment when you were below the age of 22
a full week’s pay for each complete year of employment when you were between the ages of 22 and 40 inclusive
a week and a half’s pay for each complete year of employment when you were aged 41 or above.

You can't be given statutory redundancy pay for more than 20 years' employment.
Maybe you can work out a comparison?
 

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But this is only for profitable companies. If a company can show it has been running at a loss for three consecutive quarters, they will only get 20 days.

If you are in your one-year probationary period on a permanent contract, you can now be dismissed at any time with no reason given and no compensation.

Companies will also be able to reduce pay and change contracted working conditions without having to get government approval.

Why should the Government intervene in what is essentially a dispute between employer and employees?

It should be a matter for unions and employer to negotiate.

Is there no Spanish equivalent of ACAS?

I cannot understand why any profitable company would want to get rid of good employees.
 

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agree with jimenato.short term spain is much better. uk better long term which leads to other issues of ppl living off benifits for life
It's only better if you are working on a proper permanent contract. At least 30% of workers are on temporary contracts (including all those people who work in seasonal jobs **** tourism and agriculture) and an unknown number work "on the black". Neither of these categories get any redundancy pay and can be laid off at will.
 

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I cannot understand why any profitable company would want to get rid of good employees.
Usually because they can hire cheaper labour in other parts of the world. IT companies especially are notorious for outsourcing.

The publisher I worked for in the UK, after being taken over by an American company, sacked two-thirds of the UK employees and moved the customer service, production and software development operations to Singapore and India where wages are cheaper and there are no annoying labour protection regulations. The money they spent on redundancy payments was recouped in less than four years.
 

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Usually because they can hire cheaper labour in other parts of the world. IT companies especially are notorious for outsourcing.

The publisher I worked for in the UK, after being taken over by an American company, sacked two-thirds of the UK employees and moved the customer service, production and software development operations to Singapore and India where wages are cheaper and there are no annoying labour protection regulations. The money they spent on redundancy payments was recouped in less than four years.
Another consequence of globalisation and free trade.

Yes, I wasn't thinking things through. I'm surprised wages are lower in Singapore, though, it ranks higher than the UK on most general prosperity indices. But India, yes, of course. My son outsources his IT work to India, mainly because of skills shortage in that field in the UK but also because of the very high rates demanded by UK professionals in that specialist field when you can get them.

When this crisis is over, some form of mutually-agreed protectionism must be on the table for discussion. Domestic industry must be protected from unfair competition from cheap, unregulated labour.
 

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The publisher I worked for in the UK, after being taken over by an American company, sacked two-thirds of the UK employees and moved the customer service, production and software development operations to Singapore and India where wages are cheaper and there are no annoying labour protection regulations. The money they spent on redundancy payments was recouped in less than four years.
I worked for an IT company for several years even (together with several others) doing our best to minimise costs (we were even "self employed") but when an American company came along that only wanted a couple of our programmers and our software, the rest of us were just dumped with nothing. I did manage to keep my laptop (old Tosh Sat Win 95/98) though.
 

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Subsequent to the foregoing, I worked for Arriva (on behalf of Essec CC) who employed a number of us specifically as "minibus drivers" so that we couldn't claim the same rate of pay etc as the "big" bus drivers. When the contract came to an end, they offered to retrain us on the 'big' buses (which I didn't want) but there was no offer of redundancy. They maintained that since the had offered to retrain, there was no case for redundancy which was when they started on with "But you were employed as a Bus Driver not a minibus driver" That was when I pulled out my copy of my contract of employment which clearly stated "minibus driver" - I got £2300!

I was the only person who could do that because none of the others, on the advice of the Union, had signed a contract on the grounds that there was a clause in the contract that said that if an employee didn't work on his/her last working day (because he/she was off-sick) before a public holiday, then that person was not entitled to be paid for the public holiday which, as far as I was concerned was pefectly correct - if one is off-sick one cannot also be on holiday, public or otherwise.
 

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Subsequent to the foregoing, I worked for Arriva (on behalf of Essec CC) who employed a number of us specifically as "minibus drivers" so that we couldn't claim the same rate of pay etc as the "big" bus drivers. When the contract came to an end, they offered to retrain us on the 'big' buses (which I didn't want) but there was no offer of redundancy. They maintained that since the had offered to retrain, there was no case for redundancy which was when they started on with "But you were employed as a Bus Driver not a minibus driver" That was when I pulled out my copy of my contract of employment which clearly stated "minibus driver" - I got £2300!

I was the only person who could do that because none of the others, on the advice of the Union, had signed a contract on the grounds that there was a clause in the contract that said that if an employee didn't work on his/her last working day (because he/she was off-sick) before a public holiday, then that person was not entitled to be paid for the public holiday which, as far as I was concerned was pefectly correct - if one is off-sick one cannot also be on holiday, public or otherwise.


Quite right too! It's the post, not the person, which is redundant.I seem to have heard/read somewhere recently though that the EU (I think) wants to bring in a rule that if you go sick during your holiday you get extra days added on...
Now that is wide open to abuse....When I was in the UK you could ring your surgery, describe your symptoms and collect a sick note.
If you're sick on your holiday...just bad luck.
Life's like that.
In Spain as in the UK PYMEs make up a major part of economic activity....in the UK well over 70% of enterprises are SMEs, mainly small companies with fewer than ten employees and a working owner.
Do these people want to put companies out of business and further reduce their contribution to the tax take?? Just when we need growth which can only come from the private sector...which of course pays for the public sector...that and borrowing, of course, which we should not be doing....we should be reducing debt and deficit, not increasing it..although Osborne has ended up borrowing £billions more than if he had stuck to Darling's plan.
The plan is for the private sector to scoop up all these redundant public sector workers, isn't it??
In yer dreams, Gideon.
Sometimes I think these people don't live in the real world.
 
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