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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so my boyfriend was born in Tunisia, but is a french citizen, and has lived in france for ten years. He wants to come and live in UK, will he need a visa???
Please please help, thanks:):)
 

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Ok, so my boyfriend was born in Tunisia, but is a french citizen, and has lived in france for ten years. He wants to come and live in UK, will he need a visa???
Please please help, thanks:):)
No, not at all. Just his French passport or identity card to show on arrival, and then he can look for work or start self-employment or business, without much of a red tape. He will have to get his National Insurance number, but that can be done after getting a job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No, not at all. Just his French passport or identity card to show on arrival, and then he can look for work or start self-employment or business, without much of a red tape. He will have to get his National Insurance number, but that can be done after getting a job.
Thanks
His passport isn't French though, he has French papers and is a french citizen, so will it be the same??
 

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Thanks
His passport isn't French though, he has French papers and is a french citizen, so will it be the same??
If he has a French carte d'identité, he should be ok. But with a French carte d'identité, he should be entitled to a French passport, too. Might be worthwhile to have him get the French passport before he makes the move - just to avoid confusion.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
it turns out i have been wrong, he has only been in france 3 years and 4 months, he said card was for 10 yrs, i thought that meant he had been there 10...so does this change things, i think it does, but need claryfcation
 

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it turns out i have been wrong, he has only been in france 3 years and 4 months, he said card was for 10 yrs, i thought that meant he had been there 10...so does this change things, i think it does, but need claryfcation
It sounds to me like he isn't a French citizen, but just has his residence permit (which is also issued for 10 years at a time once you reach a certain point). There is some proviso in EU law about being able to get residency in another EU country after one has been issued a "residence card" (as it sounds like your boyfriend has).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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It sounds to me like he isn't a French citizen, but just has his residence permit (which is also issued for 10 years at a time once you reach a certain point). There is some proviso in EU law about being able to get residency in another EU country after one has been issued a "residence card" (as it sounds like your boyfriend has).
I'm not aware of any provision of granting residence right in another EU country on the strength of legal residence or permanent residency in another EU state. Unless you become an EU national, there is no advantage in being a resident in one EU state when it comes to gaining residency in another. You are still bound by the passport you hold. The only advantage relates to provisions of Schengen rules, under which you can visit other Schengen states without a Schengen visa for 90-in-180 days if you hold residency in one Schengen state.
 

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I'm not aware of any provision of granting residence right in another EU country on the strength of legal residence or permanent residency in another EU state. Unless you become an EU national, there is no advantage in being a resident in one EU state when it comes to gaining residency in another. You are still bound by the passport you hold. The only advantage relates to provisions of Schengen rules, under which you can visit other Schengen states without a Schengen visa for 90-in-180 days if you hold residency in one Schengen state.
Take a look at this: Status of Non-EU Member Country nationals who are long-term residents

I haven't had time to study it in full, but someone alluded to it here on the forum a few weeks back. It might have some bearing on this situation.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Take a look at this: Status of Non-EU Member Country nationals who are long-term residents

I haven't had time to study it in full, but someone alluded to it here on the forum a few weeks back. It might have some bearing on this situation.
Cheers,
Bev
'Directive 2003/109/EC is applicable as from 23 January 2006 in all Member States except in Ireland, the United Kingdom and Denmark. For this reason third country nationals residing in these Member States are not entitled to acquire a "long-term resident status - EC" and consequently they will not be able to move to another Member State under facilitated conditions. Furthermore, third country nationals who acquired "long-term resident status - EC" in the Member States bound by the Directive will not automatically be in the position to go to these three Member States either. In these cases applications under national law will have to be submitted.'
Justice and Home Affairs - FAQ - Immigration policy in the European Union

So the OP's boyfriend, presumably a Tunisian national, will have to apply for a relevant visa to live long-term in UK under UK immigration law, which is generally very difficult to achieve. Maybe a study visa or, in the longer term, a fiance or marriage visa.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
'Directive 2003/109/EC is applicable as from 23 January 2006 in all Member States except in Ireland, the United Kingdom and Denmark. For this reason third country nationals residing in these Member States are not entitled to acquire a "long-term resident status - EC" and consequently they will not be able to move to another Member State under facilitated conditions. Furthermore, third country nationals who acquired "long-term resident status - EC" in the Member States bound by the Directive will not automatically be in the position to go to these three Member States either. In these cases applications under national law will have to be submitted.'
Justice and Home Affairs - FAQ - Immigration policy in the European Union

So the OP's boyfriend, presumably a Tunisian national, will have to apply for a relevant visa to live long-term in UK under UK immigration law, which is generally very difficult to achieve. Maybe a study visa or, in the longer term, a fiance or marriage visa.

Yes, this is what I thought. Oh well, thanks for all your help anyway.
 

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Hello everyone,

I'm jumping in on this old post because i'm considering going to university in the England, but I wouldn't want to go if my French boyfriend can't come with me. Since i'm non EU and I need a visa for everything, I don't know how it works for EU citizens moving and working within the EU. How long can he legaly stay there? Is there even a limit? Does he need a visa to work? And yes, he speaks fluent english. Any imput is much apriciated.

Thanks,
Martha
 

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Hello everyone,

I'm jumping in on this old post because i'm considering going to university in the England, but I wouldn't want to go if my French boyfriend can't come with me. Since i'm non EU and I need a visa for everything, I don't know how it works for EU citizens moving and working within the EU. How long can he legaly stay there? Is there even a limit? Does he need a visa to work? And yes, he speaks fluent english. Any imput is much apriciated.
He as a French citizen can do more or less what he likes in UK, to live, to study or work without restriction. To come to UK as a family member (unmarried partner) of an EU citizen, you need to have lived together in France for 2 years. It helps if you are in PACS with your French partner. So if you want to come to UK to study, you partner needs to be in UK - before or arriving together - and after three months he needs to be exercising treaty rights by working, studying or being self-sufficient. You should get EEA family permit from the British embassy, and then you can switch to residence card valid 5 years after arrival (and when he is exercising treaty rights). You will still be subject to international student fees, around £10,000 to £18,000 a year.
 

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as a french citizen expat in uk , I confirm the previous post, I travel only with my ID card between france and the uk
 
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