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I have been living in a smaller city in Peru (Piura). I love the "smaller town living". I and personally feel that that smaller towns overseas have more to offer than the mega captials of various countries.

If you live in a smaller town or city around the world, can you please share with me, the pace of life, and what you like about living there. Also, please let us know the cost of living there.

Thanks in advance.....
 

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I live about 2 hours from you in an even smaller town Lo Organos, what's your story why Peru? i live here with Wife and small son half peruvian hence the country , the location because it is beutiful ( on the coast) unsoilt and less complex.

G
 

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I live in a microscopic village on a tiny Greek island. I absolutely love it! Now I will say that I also maintain ties with Athens, for example now that I am very ill and getting ready for surgery on Monday, I am in Athens, as I would definitely be up s**t-creek as we Americans say, if I stayed on the island.

Why I love it... it's gorgeous, I mean, tears-in-your-eyes, can't-breathe gorgeous. The people there are very friendly and although, since it's a small place, they do kind of know all of our business, they are not judgey or annoying about it. Prices for individual items are higher than on the mainland, but there are so few places to actually spend money that in the end you save money. It's so peaceful. I love that. I grew up in the country and am used to quiet and peace and after spending all of my 20's living in cities, it's a needed change.

Cost of living, well: we (a couple) pay €240/month for rent which includes internet. electricity and water are extra. Food: there are no farmers' markets on the island so we pay a premium for grocery items. We go to the grocery store about 4-5 times / week and we spend about €5-€20 each time. We do pay a lot for food. There's nothing else to spend money on here, though. There is no bookstore, no movie theater, no cafes (!!), no restaurants that we aren't sick of, no roads to speak of so we buy gas every 4 months.

The hardest part for me is the health care aspect. I have chronic health problems and that means I have to make a trip to the city for doctors/hospital appointments and will have to for the forseeable future.

I do believe in the healing properties of a stress-free, clean-air, quiet, friendly, peaceful environment, however!!
 

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I live in a microscopic village on a tiny Greek island. I absolutely love it! Now I will say that I also maintain ties with Athens, for example now that I am very ill and getting ready for surgery on Monday, I am in Athens, as I would definitely be up s**t-creek as we Americans say, if I stayed on the island.

Why I love it... it's gorgeous, I mean, tears-in-your-eyes, can't-breathe gorgeous. The people there are very friendly and although, since it's a small place, they do kind of know all of our business, they are not judgey or annoying about it. Prices for individual items are higher than on the mainland, but there are so few places to actually spend money that in the end you save money. It's so peaceful. I love that. I grew up in the country and am used to quiet and peace and after spending all of my 20's living in cities, it's a needed change.

Cost of living, well: we (a couple) pay €240/month for rent which includes internet. electricity and water are extra. Food: there are no farmers' markets on the island so we pay a premium for grocery items. We go to the grocery store about 4-5 times / week and we spend about €5-€20 each time. We do pay a lot for food. There's nothing else to spend money on here, though. There is no bookstore, no movie theater, no cafes (!!), no restaurants that we aren't sick of, no roads to speak of so we buy gas every 4 months.

The hardest part for me is the health care aspect. I have chronic health problems and that means I have to make a trip to the city for doctors/hospital appointments and will have to for the forseeable future.

I do believe in the healing properties of a stress-free, clean-air, quiet, friendly, peaceful environment, however!!
Hi there...I see that your thread is a year old. ..Like you, I live in a smaller town overseas. I love the calmness that you can't find in any foreign captial or large city.

I am curious if you still live in a small village on the Greek Island. Can you update us on the costs of living there? I network with expats from around the world that live in small towns. I feel we have a different perspective that other expats living in major cities.

Hope to hear from you soon!
 

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STE, sure, I'm happy to update. We still live on the island, although we moved (as of September) to the main town of the island (we were living in the port town which was MUCH smaller). The town where we live now has a population of about 200 (the port town had a population around 40).

Now we pay €270/month rent for a very small apartment with no modern conveniences to speak of (no washing machine for example). We still pay a LOT for food compared to the mainland. This year we've been hit pretty hard by the Greek economic crisis since my husband is a public sector employee and we're trying to save for the down payment on a house at the same time as all the cuts.

We're moving away from here at the end of June. We'll be moving to a medium-sized town in a totally different part of Greece. This is because my husband was transferred for work BUT we are also ready to move on. We miss being able to participate in cultural activities, and I can't work on the island as there are no jobs here. We also are looking forward to being able to buy more than the VERY basic foods. You can't even get a newspaper on the island. So there are aspects of life here that are very challenging.

However, for two years that we lived here it was great. I never thought we'd stay here forever but I am SO glad we did live here as long as we did. If I had very small (pre-school) children, it's the kind of place I'd want them to grow up in. But once they were school age, I'd want to move to a bigger place with more opportunities.

I will miss so much about living here. I will miss the sheer beauty of the place, the fact that literally everyone knows us, the total absence of crime (the police officer's only job is to sort out the bickering over how far over the various restaurant owners can place their tables and chairs without encroaching on the space of the next restaurant), the clean air, the quiet, the ability to walk in my flip-flops about 50 meters to the supermarket. I will miss not having to lock the door. I will certainly miss only having to fill the gas tank every 3 months.

But it's not a place to stay forever unless you are really from here. It's hard to fit in fully in such a small place as a newcomer. My husband is Greek and he doesn't fit in here at all because he's not from THIS part of Greece. Even people from the next island over don't really fit in. We have friends who moved here to live permanently and they have cultivated great friendships with other newcomers (like us) but not with the locals. There really is a two-level society here, the locals and the "others," and then of course the tourists who don't really belong to the society but contribute to its economy in an overwhelming way (tourism is about 95% of the island economy).

After two years, I have a much more complex picture of life here - it's not all beaches and sunsets, but it's still a very special experience that I feel very lucky to have had.
 

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That's a nice post, i have always fancied living in the greek islands,but that will have to wait for the loto win lol .Having lived in small villages here in lanzarote and in the UK, as a "newcomer" it's very true what you say about never being really be a local ,it's the shared experience of growing up in a place,going to school there ,and having older family around that make you a true local. Anyway i do hope your move works out.
Geoff
 

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I'd love to get out of the rat race, and go somewhere where the pace of life is slower, where people take more time for each other and not let time schedules rush them day in day out. I heard Latin America is an excellent place for that, so I have thought about spending a while in the likes of Ecuador, Peru, Cuba, ...

I heard from someone who lived in Peru (but he lived in Lima and has left back to Europe a few years ago so maybe things changed drastically meanwhile) that cost of life is phenomenonly cheap, with 50€ a month being more than enough to pay rent, food and all other things you need. :eek: Is that really true? I realise these countries will indeed be much cheaper than Europe, but it also sounds like there's something odd when you hear stories about people surviving on a 30 to 50 € salary a month.
 

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I have been living in a smaller city in Peru (Piura). I love the "smaller town living". I and personally feel that that smaller towns overseas have more to offer than the mega captials of various countries.

If you live in a smaller town or city around the world, can you please share with me, the pace of life, and what you like about living there. Also, please let us know the cost of living there.

Thanks in advance.....
Try to wiki bagontaas, bukidnon, philippines. Many foreigners like the place.:clap2:
 

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My Life in Bodrum

I live in Bodrum, on the Aegean coast of Turkey, where charming white washed buildings huddle together cheek by jowl. Bodrum is where the unconventional come to escape the stiffling conformity of everyday Turkish life and where the monied sort come to play. The cost of living in Turkey has risen to average European levels in recent years and my expenses are only a little less than they would be in, say, Spain.

Occasional trips to London give me my big city fix which is something I need from time to time. However, my usual laid-back humdrum life keeps my stress and blood pressure down and gives me the opportunity to write about my experiences in paradise on Perking the Pansies.
 

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I have been living in a smaller city in Peru (Piura). I love the "smaller town living". I and personally feel that that smaller towns overseas have more to offer than the mega captials of various countries.

If you live in a smaller town or city around the world, can you please share with me, the pace of life, and what you like about living there. Also, please let us know the cost of living there.

Thanks in advance.....
I live in a tiny town (village, more like), in the Netherlands. I too love the . We're pretty covered when it comes to amenities, and you're never really far from a bigger town here anyways. the only minus point is that our expat friends live in the bigger cities, and there is no public transport. Ah well, can't have it all. I feel we're integrating a lot more to the real Dutch way of life than if we lived in a more cosmopolitan area.

Always been a small town girl myself, so suits me fine.

My 2-cents.
 

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We live near the Chanthaburi coast, on the eastern side of the Gulf of Thailand - town of about 3-4000, 12km inland to a city of about 70,000 people, another 40km from there and we're in Cambodia. Leased a new 2 storey 2 bedroom house - 3,500 baht per month.

At today's rates 1000 baht is 20 GBP, $32 USD

Yes it has running water; cable internet, cable tv (though just 4 of the 63 channels offer English - 1 movie, 2 sport, 1 USA news). Utilities - electricity, water, internet, tv add to about 1500 per month, we've only paid for electricity twice this year as we've been under the low usage rate of 90 units of electricity (no aircon) which means it is free, an incentive to conserve electricity.

There are downsides for some - just one other native-English speaker in our town of 5,000, and I've seen him just three times, at the exercise park, since March. Some elderly Germans own a house here on a a share basis and each one spends three months here each year.

The nearest bookshop for eg a novel in English would be 150km away; there are two multi-cinema complexes in the city but Thai-language only, no subtitles. There are no bars in our town; no nightclubs. No liquor store, it is generally a 'dry' area, but 7-11 and one other shop have a small selection.

The positives, for us: the beautiful beaches and coastline, wonderful cycling country - there's more than 50km of road with dedicated cycle lanes along the coast, and very little traffic; the food - much of Thailand's fruit is grown in this province and it is so cheap at the markets, as is locally caught fish. We've found the people to be very welcoming - just my observation but more friendly than other places I've been here. It is 'different' - Chanthaburi has a mix of ethnicities with a high % of people Vietnamese and Chinese, some Cambodians too, also the highest % Christian population in the country.

If I did not have a Thai partner it would be difficult at times living here - eg finding a house, lease agreements, our landlords speak no English apart from 'hello'. There are two universities within 10km some of the students like to have a little conversation, but very limited in that respect.

Not for everyone it could get extremely lonely etc for many people. I love the climate - it's the dry season 'winter' now and overnight temps are cooler dropping to 19-20 for December, warming up next month, daytime 28-32; the wet season May-Oct was warmer, high 30s at times and rain tended to arrive in short bursts of huge downpours then sunshine.

Happy here, no plans to move. Prior to moving here in March 2011 we'd spent a year in a rural village, population about 120 but just 3km to another village of about 1500. Found that just too small, isolated, lacking in facilities.
 
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