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I live in Florida but am back in the UK visiting my folks. One of the things I really miss living in the US, is runner beans. My dad has given me some beans to bring back with me, he tells me if I just drop them in some soil, they will grow. Can I bring them back with me or will I be in trouble when i re enter the states.
 

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I live in Florida but am back in the UK visiting my folks. One of the things I really miss living in the US, is runner beans. My dad has given me some beans to bring back with me, he tells me if I just drop them in some soil, they will grow. Can I bring them back with me or will I be in trouble when i re enter the states.
There may be an easier way.

There are runner beans for sale on on ebay.com of various varieties and from US sellers.

Even one variety that attracts Hummingbirds.

What more could you want? Unless of course you do not like Hummingbirds...!
 

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No you cannot import seed unless you have authorization by USDA. Of course you can try to smuggle them in. As seeds are grown for specific markets your UK beans will probably come up, get leggy and that is it. FL soil temperatures do not agree with them.

Head scratch!!! Have you been to Lowes, WalMart, HomeDepot ... lately? If their varieties do not hit the spot call your county's extension office and ask for the hotline to the Mastergardener Program. They will provide you with information regarding varietes which grow best locally and planting/growing instructions. Beans do not grow well with some other plants, have a very low need for nitrogen in fertilizer ...
 

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Google around a bit for professional gardener catalogs or even just for seed catalogs. My cousin does some professional bio-farming in New Hampshire and every time I mention to her something I'm interested in growing in France, she drags out these huge catalogs full of varieties of plants and vegetables I've never heard of before.

Whether categorized as an "heirloom" variety or an "exotic" I'd be willing to bet you can find something available within the US that will suit your needs.

And to add to what twostep had to say, it's often recommended to plant beans along with corn. Beans set nitrogen in the soil in the form of little nodule thingees on their roots, while corn needs large amounts of nitrogen. You can plant the two together so that the beans use the cornstalk for support - and the opposite needs of the two plants work together in perfect harmony.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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If everything fails - send me a pm with a mailing adress. I am with the AL Master Gardener Program at Auburn. Yes Bev - a long way from interpreter/banker and still part time recruiter.
 
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