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I have gotten different opinions on what to do about this. I will be living in Mazatlan for at least a year as I have signed a 1 yr. lease. Some say legally I should spend the $200+ to get one. Others have been living on their temp. visa for 30 yrs. Another tells me he couldn't make enough $$ to live there, so he just doesn't have anything and says no one has ever been deported for not having a visa. I would love to hear other opinions please and experiences. I will be moving June 29. Thanks!
 

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Mexican Immigration charges $5413 pesos to process a Residente Temporal visa/card in Mexico plus $35.00US for the Mexican Consulate plus $332 pesos for a 30 day FMM "canje" card. About $420.00 US. Photos [3] cost about $200.00 pesos. If you get one you can join a socialized medical plan in Mexico, an INAPAM card if over 60 for 50% off intercity bus tickets, etc. and no need to return to Nogales 2 times. I might be easier to get bank accounts, telephone, cable, electricity, water services etc.
 

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Permits issued for permission to be in the country as a tourist do not apply to people who reside in Mexico. Residents aren't tourists.
 

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Most Americans (esp. younger ones) live in Mexico with the FMM (6 month tourist card) and then leave Mexico and return back to get a new FMM. Last I read the income requirements for any visa other than FMM was proof of $1500/month or more in bank for 6 months or more. The problem is that if you travel somewhere and get checked by immigration and don't have any type of visa you can be deported and not allowed to return to Mexico. Most people who live near Mexico City cross into Guatemela at the expiration of their FMM and then cross back into Mexico and get a new FMM. If you are near California, Arizona or Texas then simply go back to one of those borders to get a new FMM. Getting a VISA other than FMM is not that easy. Read Rolly Brook's website about requirements for the various VISAs. And don't believe those that say INM never checks your immigration status esp. if you are not in Baja (which is more lenient). Ive read on many forums that people got into a lot of trouble with INM when they didn't have documentation.
 

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Most Americans (esp. younger ones) live in Mexico with the FMM (6 month tourist card) and then leave Mexico and return back to get a new FMM. . . . .
I don't know any Americans living in Mexico who use FMM's instead of holding Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente status. Maybe you know a different class of expats than I do!
 

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You should have added that this is merely your opinion, Longford, not a fact supported by Mexican law.
Certainly it's an opinion ... which I believe is supported by the written regulations which appear on the form and by the text of the regulations describing the visa/permission categories.

If you have found an exception to the published regulations and texts appearing on the forms which provide an exemption for foreigners who have established residency in Mexico from the requirement to comply with the regulations, if they don't want to, or allowing them to lie about the purpose for their presence in Mexico ... please post a link to that. I think even a high school student understands the difference between who is as tourist and who is a resident.

It's one thing for someone to ask a question, and its another to provide information regarding how to break the law or violate the Mexican regulations ... advice which would, if offered, violate the terms of participation on this very forum from what I understand.

Instead of encouraging people to live in Mexico illegally, persons who claim to admire and respect Mexico and Mexicans might want to demonstrate those things by encouraging people who may in Mexico, or thinking of coming to Mexico, to honor and obey the law. :)
 

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Certainly it's an opinion ... which I believe is supported by the written regulations which appear on the form and by the text of the regulations describing the visa/permission categories.

If you have found an exception to the published regulations and texts appearing on the forms which provide an exemption for foreigners who have established residency in Mexico from the requirement to comply with the regulations, if they don't want to, or allowing them to lie about the purpose for their presence in Mexico ... please post a link to that. I think even a high school student understands the difference between who is as tourist and who is a resident.

It's one thing for someone to ask a question, and its another to provide information regarding how to break the law or violate the Mexican regulations ... advice which would, if offered, violate the terms of participation on this very forum from what I understand.

Instead of encouraging people to live in Mexico illegally, persons who claim to admire and respect Mexico and Mexicans might want to demonstrate those things by encouraging people who may in Mexico, or thinking of coming to Mexico, to honor and obey the law. :)
Thank you for your comments, which we shall give due consideration, again. On the other hand, maybe not. LOL
 

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Longford, getting tired of writing this same message to you.
Would you just give a link to the Official Mexican Gov. website that collaborates what you are stating.
And please stop insinuating that people that live in Mexico on the 180 FMM are not breaking the law, there is no law, if there is ----show me........
 

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Permits issued for permission to be in the country as a tourist do not apply to people who reside in Mexico. Residents aren't tourists.
Yer at it again with right/wrong and tourist permits

I have two Canadian neighbors that own property and only have Tourists Permits. They are only here for winter months and fly in and out.
 

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Notes:
The FMM is not a visa. It is used for many things, including a 180 day tourist permit (visitante), at the discretion of the border agent you encounter upon entry.
A visa, either Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente, must be applied for in your home country; not in Mexico unless married to a Mexican or the parent or offspring of a Mexican, etc.
One may not work in Mexico without a visa permitting such activity.
Now that Mexican authorities are computerized, it is wise to do things legally.
 

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My wife and I are looking into moving to Rosarito. At first we plan on leasing for 6 months just to make sure we've made the correct decision. Do we need to apply for the temporary resident Visa, or can we do this after we've been there a few months and have decided to stay?
 

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Technically, you will remain a tourist if you do that and your visit is expected to be 72 hours. An FMM tourist permit would allow 180 days, but might make it difficult to enter into a lease contract, or to obtain other services. A Residente Temporal visa solves all those potential problems and complications.
 

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Technically, you will remain a tourist if you do that and your visit is expected to be 72 hours. An FMM tourist permit would allow 180 days, but might make it difficult to enter into a lease contract, or to obtain other services. A Residente Temporal visa solves all those potential problems and complications.
If you do decide to apply for a Residente Temporal visa, you'll have to return to the US to begin the application process at a Mexican Consulate.
 

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My wife and I are looking into moving to Rosarito. At first we plan on leasing for 6 months just to make sure we've made the correct decision. Do we need to apply for the temporary resident Visa, or can we do this after we've been there a few months and have decided to stay?
When you apply for the temporary resident visa, you have to start the process at the Mexican embassy in your home country. You would probably be best off visiting for 6 months as tourists (it’s actually 180 days – a little less than 6 months) to see whether you will want to stay long-term. Then if you decide to make the move, you will have to return home to put in the application for your resident visa.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks to all for your comments. I will do the right thing. I just needed further verification from what I had been told from others.
 
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