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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I arrived in France in 2007 as a student, which means I recently completed my 5 years of legal residence required to apply for nationality on a non-marriage basis.

During that time, however, I married a French citizen. We will have been married 4 years on the 17th of May. I received my Carte de Résident last June.

Unfortunately, my relationship has been failing for a while and we have decided to get a divorce. We are signing the papers on the 24th of May.

I would like to apply for nationality on my own based on my five years of residence, my university studies, my language and cultural integration, and my CDI. However, seeing as I received my Carte de Résident based on my marriage and not on my job, I worry about it being revoked since we are divorcing.

I've looked at the civil codes online and it seems to say that after four years of marriage you cannot have it revoked in the case of a divorce. Can I rest easy then?

I didn't get married for papers, these things just happen. But my life has been in France in some capacity since I was 20 and I can't imagine going back to the US. I just want to be reassured that I can make this decision that needs to be made and not be punished for it.

And if I do apply for nationality on my own, does the fact that I am divorcing play against me or do the other factors like university studies, fluency, and full integration weigh more than that?

Thanks for any clarification anyone might have. I can give more details if that helps.

Best,
Kate
 

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The fact that you have your carte de resident means that you are legally in France. If you want to apply for French nationality, you have the option of applying for naturalization or for nationality by marriage. If you go the naturalization route, then your marriage doesn't play into the requirements. Fulfill those requirements and your marriage isn't relevant.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The fact that you have your carte de resident means that you are legally in France. If you want to apply for French nationality, you have the option of applying for naturalization or for nationality by marriage. If you go the naturalization route, then your marriage doesn't play into the requirements. Fulfill those requirements and your marriage isn't relevant.
Cheers,
Bev
Hi Bev,

Thanks for such a quick response.

It's hard to believe it's that simple. That's great!

So the fact that our official signing will fall just after four years of marriage (I only found out about this four year rule today, which worried me because I thought it was three) will not put me at any risk given that the card was delivered after three years of marriage?

Sorry to insist, I just want to make sure I understand everything.

Thanks again for your help.

Best,
Kate
 
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