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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last year, OFII sentenced me to take French classes as part of my Contrat d'accueil et d'integration. The vendor was to determine the number of hours of education I was to receive. I strongly believe that the ownership of this school are graduates of both the Mickey Mouse Club and the New York Institute of the Screw based upon how they handle their business with students referred to them by both OFII and Pole Emploi.

They insist that to fulfill my agreement with OFII and to renew my Carte de Sejour that a student must pass their DILF exams A1.1 and A1 before your renewal period at the first year. Is this correct? Are you required to sit for these exams or just complete the hours you are required to take the French classes? If you complete the hours but don't sit for the exams, what could be the end result? Thanks very much. Warm regards!
 

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I'm sorry, but this another of my "sorry, can't help" posts

I've not heard of DILF, but I'll look it up.

When I came to France I went to Alliance Française and took the DELF exams. They seemed fairly easy. After that I went to Rouen University and took the DALF course and exams - and that was tough! 2 days a week for 2 years to do all 8 modules - homework etc. BUT - a very good grounding in theory and practice of French.

DejW

Last year, OFII sentenced me to take French classes as part of my Contrat d'accueil et d'integration. The vendor was to determine the number of hours of education I was to receive. I strongly believe that the ownership of this school are graduates of both the Mickey Mouse Club and the New York Institute of the Screw based upon how they handle their business with students referred to them by both OFII and Pole Emploi.

They insist that to fulfill my agreement with OFII and to renew my Carte de Sejour that a student must pass their DILF exams A1.1 and A1 before your renewal period at the first year. Is this correct? Are you required to sit for these exams or just complete the hours you are required to take the French classes? If you complete the hours but don't sit for the exams, what could be the end result? Thanks very much. Warm regards!
 

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That's actually an excellent question. Back when the OFII first got into the business of those contrats d'accueil, it was pretty much just a matter of sitting through the classes, but gradually they have added the requirement that you have to pass the test (at the A-1 level, which is pretty basic). More information on the DILF, DELF and DALF and their comparison/convergence here: DILF - Diplôme Initial de Langue Française

Basically, the certificate saying you've passed is one of the documents required to apply for your first carte de séjour (i.e. as opposed to the titre de séjour in your passport). The test really isn't that hard - and if they sandbag your attempts to take it, look into taking the A-1 level DELF through some other organization (like Alliance Française, for example).

To take French nationality as the spouse of a French citizen you need to have a certificate at the B1 level.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks David & Bev for the information. What I really needed was clarification of what the truth was. Last June, the instructor of my French class said I was required to take the exams but she was not clear on which exams were required or which were optional. The A1.1 seems pretty simple while I have heard A1 was a little harder. The third exam, everyone says is very hard. There were three doctors in my class last June and all three agreed that the third exam was difficult. Sadly, it takes a month for the results. Thank you again. Warm regards!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If I might ask another question on this, please...if a person is taking an exam, has difficulty with it and fails it, but later retakes it and passes it, do they show the number of attempts to take the exam before the person finally passed it and so on? Example...As a complete idiot, I sit eight times for the B1 exam. On my eighth attempt I finally pass it. I then apply for French citizenship. If they show I made eight attempts, either the interviewer will think "why should I give this idiot French citizenship" or will say "this guy really wants to be French". Thanks as always. Warm regards!
 

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Dunno if this could apply to you, Koppazee, but special consideration seems to be given to Seniors applying for citizenship thru marriage who are having trouble with the DELF B1.

"Les personnes qui en raison de leur âge, de leur état de santé déficient chronique ou d'un handicap ne peuvent pas produire un diplôme ou une attestation font l'objet d'un entretien individuel avec un agent de la préfecture."

Also, for info: at present, those over 65 don't have to prove fluency for the carte de résident.

Salut, Charlot
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dunno if this could apply to you, Koppazee, but special consideration seems to be given to Seniors applying for citizenship thru marriage who are having trouble with the DELF B1.

"Les personnes qui en raison de leur âge, de leur état de santé déficient chronique ou d'un handicap ne peuvent pas produire un diplôme ou une attestation font l'objet d'un entretien individuel avec un agent de la préfecture."

Also, for info: at present, those over 65 don't have to prove fluency for the carte de résident.

Salut, Charlot
Thanks Charlot but I am no where 65. I still have a few more years before I can apply for citizenship, so I will have done the B1 long before this.. Warm regards!
 

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Most exams of this type may have some restriction on how soon you can re-take the exam after failing it. Like, if you fail, you may have to wait a month or maybe two before you can take it again.

But as far as I know, they don't indicate (or really care) how many times it took you to pass.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's actually an excellent question. Back when the OFII first got into the business of those contrats d'accueil, it was pretty much just a matter of sitting through the classes, but gradually they have added the requirement that you have to pass the test (at the A-1 level, which is pretty basic). More information on the DILF, DELF and DALF and their comparison/convergence here: DILF - Diplôme Initial de Langue Française

Basically, the certificate saying you've passed is one of the documents required to apply for your first carte de séjour (i.e. as opposed to the titre de séjour in your passport). The test really isn't that hard - and if they sandbag your attempts to take it, look into taking the A-1 level DELF through some other organization (like Alliance Française, for example).

To take French nationality as the spouse of a French citizen you need to have a certificate at the B1 level.
Cheers,
Bev
Tonight, my wife told me she received a call from ALAJI, the vendor for OFII in our region. Classes were to begin today, but when I showed up at the place where the classes were held, the doors were locked, no students and no sign on the door. I called several phone numbers in their website and the ones that were answered, the staff provided other numbers to call. The teacher last semester made it clear that classes were to begin today!

No one that I spoke with were able to help me. The lady who called my wife told her that I completed my required hours for the A1.1 DILF exam and that I should send them two pre addressed, post paid envelopes to schedule me for the A1.1 exam. She said it could be up to two months to sit for the next, upcoming exam.

She said that due to budgetary issues, the government no longer requires the A1 exam nor do they pay ALAJI any additional funds should I want to sit for the second exam, the A1 exam. She did say, rather begrudgingly that I could attend the class for another 100 hours and then take the second exam at no added cost.

One comment I want to make is that in mid May, many of the students in my class were told that they completed their hours and even though they had yet to sit for either of the exams were no longer welcome at the class. Several were asked to leave the class at that moment and could not even sit until the end of that session. According to the lady that called my wife, money for funding has become very, very tight. I did notice that they removed two major pieces of equipment that were widely used by the teacher last May. The photo copy machine and the computer which she used both for widely distributed handouts (rather than supplying or selling at cost a textbook to prepare for the exams) and the computer which she used to schedule students for the exams.

So here we are on 5 September and they still have no information when their educational program to my community (which has many, many immigrants) and are trying verbally to discourage students from attending their classes). They told my wife they will contact her when they determine a schedule. Maybe it is time to reach out to OFII? If the vendor is in trouble, I don't want to be caught in the middle of this when it is time to renew my Carte De Sejour.

So it brings me to question two points:

1. If what this lady said is true, I would like to see the change to the OFII and Prefecture requirements to avoid any potential problems down the road

2. With budgetary issues and cuts being the case nationwide, how will this affect immigrants who want to live in France and the future of this nation regarding the French language? If many of the immigrants are poor, how will they be able to afford French language instruction and be able to communicate in their new home land?

Warm regards!
 

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Quite honestly, this sounds like a local problem with this particular service provider. Yes, money is getting tight, and yes, it was kind of amazing when the language classes requirement was initially imposed that the classes were going to be free. In the current climate it doesn't surprise me at all that this is changing.

1. If what this lady said is true, I would like to see the change to the OFII and Prefecture requirements to avoid any potential problems down the road
That's not how things work here in France. (Or back in the US, for that matter.) Yes, changing the requirements would be the logical approach, but well, things just don't seem to work that way. In any event, you will need some sort of "certificate" to indicate that you have either attended the language classes or have passed the exam at the basic level. That's what is currently required to renew your carte de séjour - the certificate.

2. With budgetary issues and cuts being the case nationwide, how will this affect immigrants who want to live in France and the future of this nation regarding the French language? If many of the immigrants are poor, how will they be able to afford French language instruction and be able to communicate in their new home land?
It is rather remarkable that the language lessons here in France are offered for free. Most other countries make immigrants pay for their language classes, even while requiring a minimum level of proficiency for a resident permit or citizenship. The UK, the Netherlands, and yes, even the US. In many countries, making immigrants pay for their own language classes is one way to weed out poor immigrants.

But I still think that this may be an issue with the service provider in your area. Contact the OFII and ask quite innocently what you should do. They may have to take it through "channels" but they'll eventually get something sorted out.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Re my post in this thread #2. I took the Dal course and exams in 2002 and 2003. I've just looked at the Dalf info on the web and I see that it has changed since I took it. Therefore my comments may not reflect the DALF today.

I found the DALF course very hard work, but refreshing and made lots of friends - some current even today.

DejW
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just some updated information to forum members related to OFII and French language instruction. Since my last posting, ALAJI did not call back to report when classes in our immigrant filled town of 16,000 inhabitants would begin again. The students in my class last June were told to report on September 5th but the doors were locked, no signs on the doors, etc. Calls to ALAJI provided no info. Today, my wife called OFII. She provided them with my contract number so that they could pull up my file. According to OFII, they have changed the requirements and now only require the DILF A1.1 exam. They no longer require the A1 exam in addition to the A1.1.

After ALAJI determines the number of hours you can receive French instruction and you deplete those hours, without any thank you or kind parting words, you are given the boot and are scheduled for the A1.1 exam. My wife was further told by OFII that they will no longer pay for instruction with ALAJI for the A1 exam unless ALAJI contacts OFII and only if funds are available. So now we have it from the horses mouth! Warm regards!
 

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Because of budgetary constraints, OFII now requires that for Carte de Sejour/residence the applicant sit for a recommended number of hours (150hrs or 250 hrs) of french classes and consequently give the DILF exam. The classes and examination fees are paid for by the French government.
It is a very junior level or diploma as they call it, for testing your French skills.

DELF A1, A2 are not needed for renewal of your carte de residence. In case you wish to study these levels or give their exams, you do so at your own cost, which is expensive.

Als, if you are applying for French nationality, you need to clear B1 level/ diploma. And for this level, the classes and examination, are again paid for by the government.

So, to answer your question inform OFII, tout de suite, that the vendor isn't taking classes and they will suggest what course to follow.




Quite honestly, this sounds like a local problem with this particular service provider. Yes, money is getting tight, and yes, it was kind of amazing when the language classes requirement was initially imposed that the classes were going to be free. In the current climate it doesn't surprise me at all that this is changing.


That's not how things work here in France. (Or back in the US, for that matter.) Yes, changing the requirements would be the logical approach, but well, things just don't seem to work that way. In any event, you will need some sort of "certificate" to indicate that you have either attended the language classes or have passed the exam at the basic level. That's what is currently required to renew your carte de séjour - the certificate.


It is rather remarkable that the language lessons here in France are offered for free. Most other countries make immigrants pay for their language classes, even while requiring a minimum level of proficiency for a resident permit or citizenship. The UK, the Netherlands, and yes, even the US. In many countries, making immigrants pay for their own language classes is one way to weed out poor immigrants.

But I still think that this may be an issue with the service provider in your area. Contact the OFII and ask quite innocently what you should do. They may have to take it through "channels" but they'll eventually get something sorted out.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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