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Has anyone had their visa rejected by the case officer. Any case of visa rejection, please share. It would be helpful for the expat community
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Has anyone had their visa rejected by the case officer. Any case of visa rejection, please share. It would be helpful for the expat community
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Hi there are few cases. It happens when your claims in EOI are proved to be false. I have seen a case where an agent claims wrong points for applicant/client in EOI and his visa has been rejected.
 

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Hi there are few cases. It happens when your claims in EOI are proved to be false. I have seen a case where an agent claims wrong points for applicant/client in EOI and his visa has been rejected.
Or, if you didn't provide enough information to support your claims.

Or if you didn't meet the conditions of a previous visa.

Or, if you gave the wrong information.

Or, if you gave false information/made false claims.

Or, if you did not pass the medical/s.

Or, if you failed the character requirement.
 

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Any specific medical issues due to which Visa maybe rejected?

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Active infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis, Yellow Fever, Ebola, Polio, etc.

Possibly HIV and Hepatitis, but only if you will be working in a medical area with specific duties.

Otherwise, any significant ongoing medical condition affecting you or any family member (that is, spouse and children only) that may:

- result in significant health care and community service costs if the visa is granted. The policy threshold for the level of costs regarded as significant is currently AUD 40 000.
- require the use of Australian health care or community services that are in short supply.

The five most common diseases that permanent visa applicants who have failed the health requirement have been identified with are:

intellectual impairment
HIV infection
functional impairment
renal disease or failure
cancer.
 

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Active infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis, Yellow Fever, Ebola, Polio, etc.

Possibly HIV and Hepatitis, but only if you will be working in a medical area with specific duties.

Otherwise, any significant ongoing medical condition affecting you or any family member (that is, spouse and children only) that may:

- result in significant health care and community service costs if the visa is granted. The policy threshold for the level of costs regarded as significant is currently AUD 40 000.
- require the use of Australian health care or community services that are in short supply.

The five most common diseases that permanent visa applicants who have failed the health requirement have been identified with are:

intellectual impairment
HIV infection
functional impairment
renal disease or failure
cancer.
Though the reason is justifiable to an extent; it saddens to know that intellectual disability is considered a burden on Australian community, and that disabled people, including several children had been kept out of, or had to leave the country.
 

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I read somewhere that rejection rate is actually less than 2% (not sure how true that is), which I think is great success rate. DIBP will give you every chance to prove your credential or get treated, if you have some disease. Remember, DIBP is working to grant you a Visa and not to reject.
 

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Though the reason is justifiable to an extent; it saddens to know that intellectual disability is considered a burden on Australian community, and that disabled people, including several children had been kept out of, or had to leave the country.
Mild intellectual disability is not. But as an Australian father with an extremely disabled child, I can tell you he costs the community a significant amount - over the 5 year limit of $40,000 every year, and MANY people require over $100,000 a year. These services and supports are generally provided free to those that need them, quite apart from actual welfare support payments such as Disability Support Pension, which depends on income.

Already the National Disability Insurance Scheme has meant everyone is taxed half a percent more, and that will have to increase in future years.

The logic is of course that disabled people get the treatment and support that they need to at least nominally have a good life like any other Australian resident - that means care and support of a high quality.

It's very hard for those outside Australia with serious disabilities that would like to come here, but with these kind of costs, the Government can't simply afford to take people in that will cost the community without being able to contribute to it.

The same applies with Parent Visas - expected costs of medical care for over 65's are perhaps a few hundred thousand over the rest of their life - yet they will never have contributed to Australia's tax system - this is why there are a limited number of Parent Visas, and even the expensive Contributory Parent Visas don't come close to covering the cost to the taxpayer for every one of these visas that is granted.

There are two schemes for parents of migrants. One involves a relatively low fee of $7000 and has a waiting period of more than 30 years while the other is supposed to contribute to the costs and is set at about $47,000.

The Productivity Commission says this does not come close to covering the real cost to the taxpayer of a parent visa, which it *estimates at between $335,000 and $410,000 after health, welfare and aged-care costs are counted.

With about 8700 parents coming in under both schemes each year, that adds up to between $2.6bn and $3.2bn over a lifetime (after allowing for inflation).


I suppose some Australians might ask (if like me, they have worked and contributed to the Australian Tax system at fairly high levels all their life) why should I have to pay for foreigners health issues? If you think Australia is hard about this, try other countries!
 
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