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Is it someone who lives here permanently and legal here,is it someone who spends x number of months here and drives there UK reg car here for x number of months a year illegally or can it be some one who has a holiday home here and comes here for two weeks a year?
 

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I live here permanently, am 100% legal, car and all, and I am an immigrant.

As I and most others have so described themselves in the very many times we've discussed this before.

If Poles, Pakistanis, Romanians etc. who come to live and work legally in the UK are immigrants -I've never heard Brits refer to them as 'Polish expats' - then we Brits who live here are immigrants too.
 

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Is it someone who lives here permanently and legal here,is it someone who spends x number of months here and drives there UK reg car here for x number of months a year illegally or can it be some one who has a holiday home here and comes here for two weeks a year?
Those in the second category aren't expats, they're criminals.:)
 

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Is it someone who lives here permanently and legal here,is it someone who spends x number of months here and drives there UK reg car here for x number of months a year illegally or can it be some one who has a holiday home here and comes here for two weeks a year?
Just a wild guess, but are you talking about what qualifies people to post on an Expat Forum?
 

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An expat is someone who lives in a country for an extended period of time other than the one they were born in/that they are a citizen of.

A holidaymaker is not an expat. The legality of the car is immaterial. The person who spends 6 months in one country and 6 months in another is, I suppose, an expat while he is in the foreign country.

The immigrant v emigrant/expat issue is a big red herring - they are merely terms which are used dependant upon the point of view of the user vis a vis the migrant.
 

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.

The immigrant v emigrant/expat issue is a big red herring - they are merely terms which are used dependant upon the point of view of the user vis a vis the migrant.
Yes, and sometimes the point of view is one of horror at the thought of your British retiree settled comfortably in their community with fellow Brits describing themselves in the same terms as Moroccan pool cleaners and gardeners in Spain or Romanian turnip pickers in the UK:D

Especially if the Daily Mail is the reading matter of choice.
 

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An expat is someone who lives in a country for an extended period of time other than the one they were born in/that they are a citizen of.

A holidaymaker is not an expat. The legality of the car is immaterial. The person who spends 6 months in one country and 6 months in another is, I suppose, an expat while he is in the foreign country.

The immigrant v emigrant/expat issue is a big red herring - they are merely terms which are used dependant upon the point of view of the user vis a vis the migrant.
So to take up Mary's point, why is it that foreign people who move to live in Britain are not referred to as expats (unless they're American, Canadian, Australian or South African, of course)? By your definition, even the ones who don't have jobs should be referred to as expats not immigrants.
 

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So to take up Mary's point, why is it that foreign people who move to live in Britain are not referred to as expats (unless they're American, Canadian, Australian or South African, of course)? By your definition, even the ones who don't have jobs should be referred to as expats not immigrants.
It's easy... All those with white skins are expats.
Swarthy skin tones = immigrant, unless employed in a highly paid professional job in the financial sector or living in a mansion off invested assets.

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It's easy... All those with white skins are expats.
Swarthy skin tones = immigrant, unless employed in a highly paid professional job in the financial sector or living in a mansion off invested assets.

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Except that most Polish, Czech, Slovakian, Lithuanian, Spanish, Portugese, etc. expats don't have swarthy skin tones, unless they're Roma. Yet they are still referred to as immigrants or at best migrant workers if whoever is describing them is trying to be a little more polite.
 

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WOW, my daughter, yes, Ruby has commented on this - she looked over my shoulder and made a quite sensible comment :faint:

According to Ruby, an ex pat is someone who was/is patriotic to their country of origin, no longer lives there, but remains tied to their old country. Unlike an immigrant, who didnt care about their country of origin and wants to belong to their new country??!

Jo xxx
 

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Except that most Polish, Czech, Slovakian, Lithuanian, Spanish, Portugese, etc. expats don't have swarthy skin tones, unless they're Roma. Yet they are still referred to as immigrants or at best migrant workers if whoever is describing them is trying to be a little more polite.
Ah, but they're not white like us, are they...;)

Actually, many Poles, Slovaks, Czechs, Romanians, Spanish, Portuguese look, well, more 'tanned' than we whey-faced Brits, especially if from the more southern parts of Poland, CR, Slovakia...
 

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WOW, my daughter, yes, Ruby has commented on this - she looked over my shoulder and made a quite sensible comment :faint:

According to Ruby, an ex pat is someone who was/is patriotic to their country of origin, no longer lives there, but remains tied to their old country. Unlike an immigrant, who didnt care about their country of origin and wants to belong to their new country??!

Jo xxx
In that case, why do people who refer to foreigners living in Britain as immigrants yet at the same time berate them for not integrating - ie not wanting to belong to their new country? Surely by your daughter's definition they should most definitely be referred to as expats then, no?
 

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It seems to depend on race. No one calls a French person or an American living in the UK an immigrant. Although the British moving to Australia were called immigrants. No definitive answer
 

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WOW, my daughter, yes, Ruby has commented on this - she looked over my shoulder and made a quite sensible comment :faint:

According to Ruby, an ex pat is someone who was/is patriotic to their country of origin, no longer lives there, but remains tied to their old country. Unlike an immigrant, who didnt care about their country of origin and wants to belong to their new country??!

Jo xxx
That sounds like the best definition to me!
 

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That sounds like the best definition to me!
Indeed.

I am a well tanned Brit abroad and along with the vast majority of other Brits, am an ex pat. Constant attempts from certain cirlces, to put us down and tag us as "immigrants" is starting to wear a bit thin :rolleyes:.

Ex pat, it is a British thing, immigrants are from other places :rofl:
 

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So to take up Mary's point, why is it that foreign people who move to live in Britain are not referred to as expats (unless they're American, Canadian, Australian or South African, of course)? By your definition, even the ones who don't have jobs should be referred to as expats not immigrants.
Foreigners who come to live in Britain are immigrants from the point of view of the British. Whether or not they have jobs, and their nationality, is immaterial.

Foreigners who come to Spain to live would be called immigrants by the Spanish.

Only foreigners who have made the grave error of thinking they have somehow become Spanish would refer to expats as immigrants.

It seems some think these are emotive terms. They are not - they are descriptive.
 

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It seems to be the *ahem* ;) more left-leaning amongst us who are getting this wrong. They seem to be ascribing a sinister motive to use of the various terms. They merely denote geographic point of view - nothing worse than that.

Question: What would a third party (someone looking from the outside who was neither immigrant nor emigrant/expat) refer to us all as?
 

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It seems to be the *ahem* ;) more left-leaning amongst us who are getting this wrong. They seem to be ascribing a sinister motive to use of the various terms. They merely denote geographic point of view - nothing worse than that.

Question: What would a third party (someone looking from the outside who was neither immigrant nor emigrant/expat) refer to us all as?
Answer: You would be a German, because in the eyes of those who hail from here all foreigners are Germans.
 

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Foreigners who come to live in Britain are immigrants from the point of view of the British. Whether or not they have jobs, and their nationality, is immaterial.

Foreigners who come to Spain to live would be called immigrants by the Spanish.

Only foreigners who have made the grave error of thinking they have somehow become Spanish would refer to expats as immigrants.

It seems some think these are emotive terms. They are not - they are descriptive.
I don't think I have become Spanish at all. I am a British person who emigrated to Spain, therefore I am an immigrant in Spain.

I think your statement that all foreigners who come to live in Spain are immigrants from the point of view of the British, and their nationality is immaterial, is quite wrong. As Isobella quite rightly says, nobody ever refers to an American or a French person living in Britain as an immigrant.

Strangely enough, I don't think every foreign person who comes to live in Spain would be described as an immigrant by the Spanish themselves, either. When inmigrantes are referred to, the distinction seems to be much the same as in Britain.
 
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