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Hi all

I have tried to work this out by contacting the local government offices in the UK, but I think I am confusing them.

I have a baby daughter who is 15 months old, she was born in Spain and has a birth certificate from Spain. We as a family now live in South Africa.

Now if I want in the future for her to get a British passport what do I need to do. I don't want to pay crazy money for birth certificates from the UK embassy, can I just apply with her Spanish birth certificate proving that I am a UK citizen.

Is there any positives in her having a British birth certificate as well or in this day and age is there no need?

Finally can anybody tell me how long a British passport lasts for babies, the Spanish one only lasts for 1 year. When your overseas this becomes a bit of a hassle.

All help greatly received
 

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Now if I want in the future for her to get a British passport what do I need to do. I don't want to pay crazy money for birth certificates from the UK embassy, can I just apply with her Spanish birth certificate proving that I am a UK citizen.
The good news is that you don't need to get a British birth certificate. Just get a British passport for your child. You'll need your long form birth certificate and passport. (I believe notarized copies are okay, but please check.) You can find information on applying here: Identity and Passport Service | Home Office

Is there any positives in her having a British birth certificate as well or in this day and age is there no need?
I'm not 100% sure you can still get a British birth certificate after 15 months, but as you indicate, there's really no need. You can register the birth abroad, but all this does is gives you a certificate that says you registered the birth abroad, and counts for basically nothing. The passport is what you probably actually want.

Finally can anybody tell me how long a British passport lasts for babies, the Spanish one only lasts for 1 year. When your overseas this becomes a bit of a hassle.
5 years.
 

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I would get the British Passport for her, regardless of where you are living. Once you get her the first one, it should be easy for her (you) to renew in the future.

Even if she doesn't make much use of it now, she will still be able to benefit from having it when she is older.

Let's say that in the future, if you are still living abroad and there is a UK-Citizens only type program that might interest your daughter (i.e. trying out for a national sports team, for instance), having her proof of British Citizenship would enable her to participate for Team GB, in spite of her having grown up outside of the UK.

If she decides to go to Cambridge or Oxford (or any other university in the UK) when she's of age, she'll likely be able to circumvent the "International Student" fee schedule and pay UK Citizen tuition fees (not sure if that's how the tuition scheme works for UK universities... am going by my experiences as a former Canadian uni student).

In short, it just makes sense to afford her (and any future siblings) all of the benefits and advantages that come with having UK citizenship. It's within your means to do this for her now, so it would be crazy not to take advantage of it. (I intend on doing the same with Canadian citizenship for any children that I might have in the future)
 

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Hi all

I have tried to work this out by contacting the local government offices in the UK, but I think I am confusing them.

I have a baby daughter who is 15 months old, she was born in Spain and has a birth certificate from Spain. We as a family now live in South Africa.

Now if I want in the future for her to get a British passport what do I need to do. I don't want to pay crazy money for birth certificates from the UK embassy, can I just apply with her Spanish birth certificate proving that I am a UK citizen.

Is there any positives in her having a British birth certificate as well or in this day and age is there no need?

Finally can anybody tell me how long a British passport lasts for babies, the Spanish one only lasts for 1 year. When your overseas this becomes a bit of a hassle.

All help greatly received
You will want to get her a British passport as the others have said, if you are a British citizen, she will be British by descent (so she won't pass on her citizenship to her children unless she does one of the things that gets the "by descent" taken off). You can use the Spanish birth certificate, but I think you also need to provide a translation.

There is a ton of information on the official website, if you go down through 3 lines to the 4th bolded section it links you to outside the UK applying for british passports.

Who can apply for a child passport and when : Directgov - Travel and transport


It isn't too bad to fill out. The one place you might have a challenge is the co-sign (I believe the person has to have known you for 2 years or more). You will also need to show how the child is not living in the country they were born in (so show the Spanish passport).

Good luck.
M
 

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If she decides to go to Cambridge or Oxford (or any other university in the UK) when she's of age, she'll likely be able to circumvent the "International Student" fee schedule and pay UK Citizen tuition fees (not sure if that's how the tuition scheme works for UK universities... am going by my experiences as a former Canadian uni student).
No, she won't unless she's also a UK resident for a period of years. UK citizenship doesn't automatically entitle you to paying home fees. If you are a UK citizen living abroad you have to satisfy a residency period (I think it's 3 years at the moment) before you are eligible for home fees.
 

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No, she won't unless she's also a UK resident for a period of years. UK citizenship doesn't automatically entitle you to paying home fees. If you are a UK citizen living abroad you have to satisfy a residency period (I think it's 3 years at the moment) before you are eligible for home fees.
That is basically true. She will also pay home student fees (now up to £9000 a year and going up each year) if she lives in another EEA country for three years prior to her starting the course (i.e. exercising her EU treaty rights). So British citizenship per se doesn't entitle her to home student fees, it's residency that counts, though admittedly it's much easier to live (and work) in UK or EEA if you are a British citizen. Of course rules can change in the meantime.
 
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