Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

I've received a job offer from Czech and I'm from non EU country. I've few queries around it:

1. My employer has told to process Employment Card (EC) for me, but I see its taking anywhere from 60 days to 90 days on case basis. Can I ask my employer for Blue card (BC) if that can be faster to process?

2. What is the difference between EC & BC? In terms of benefits & application processing time?

3. Like BC allows to switch job to another EU country after completing 18 months in Czech, does EC has such provision?

4. If above answer is NO, can I apply for BC later on my own, once I reach in Czech on EC? What is the process?

Any help would be highly appreciable !

Best regards,
Ramawat
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,425 Posts
Afraid I don't know much about visa and/or work permits in Czech Republic, but as far as I know, a work permit in one EU country will not give you work rights in another. The Blue Card may be something of an exception, but the Blue Card is not used all that much in some EU countries (for example, here in France).

If your employer-to-be is processing a work permit for you, I'd let them complete the process. Sixty to 90 days is actually not too bad for these sorts of things, and chances are a Blue Card would take at least that long.
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Blue Card is the best permit you can get, you should go that route if you meet the requirements. In fact, at least in NL by law, they now have to check all regular knowledge migrant applications to see if they qualify for Blue Card instead.

The Blue Card is relatively new, and is not promulgated much by the individual countries because of the benefits it grants its holders: namely easy mobility between the participating EU countries. Naturally the countries want to retain these knowledge migrants and don't want them to leave so the BC is not promoted and also has higher fees at least in NL.
Once you have resided with BC for 18 months in one country you can transfer to another with benefits, and without losing your cumulative residence time towards EU permanent residence requirements.

Not only that, but the continuous residence requirement for BC holders is or will be reduced to 3 years. So if you live 3 years in CZ, or 18 months CZ and 18 months Spain, you can already apply for EU permanent residence.

Moreover, if you get permanent residence as a BC holder it will come with more benefits, such as you will be allowed to live abroad up to 2 years (instead of the normal 1 year) without losing the permanent residence. It also gives better benefits to family members etc.


The EC you mention sounds like it's a national permit so it's very unlikely it grants you similar benefits as the BC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Blue Card is the best permit you can get, you should go that route if you meet the requirements. In fact, at least in NL by law, they now have to check all regular knowledge migrant applications to see if they qualify for Blue Card instead.

The Blue Card is relatively new, and is not promulgated much by the individual countries because of the benefits it grants its holders: namely easy mobility between the participating EU countries. Naturally the countries want to retain these knowledge migrants and don't want them to leave so the BC is not promoted and also has higher fees at least in NL.
Once you have resided with BC for 18 months in one country you can transfer to another with benefits, and without losing your cumulative residence time towards EU permanent residence requirements.

Not only that, but the continuous residence requirement for BC holders is or will be reduced to 3 years. So if you live 3 years in CZ, or 18 months CZ and 18 months Spain, you can already apply for EU permanent residence.

Moreover, if you get permanent residence as a BC holder it will come with more benefits, such as you will be allowed to live abroad up to 2 years (instead of the normal 1 year) without losing the permanent residence. It also gives better benefits to family members etc.


The EC you mention sounds like it's a national permit so it's very unlikely it grants you similar benefits as the BC.
Hello Expat16,

Thank you for the response and I see from where you are coming from, given the huge benefits BC bring along.

You are spot-on about EC, which is nothing but long term residence permit - employment visa, hooked to a specific employer within Czech.

If the to-be employer for obvious reasons emphasizes on EC, is there a way to apply for BC by myself or BC can't be issued in parallel to EC?

Cheers. :tea:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Afraid I don't know much about visa and/or work permits in Czech Republic, but as far as I know, a work permit in one EU country will not give you work rights in another. The Blue Card may be something of an exception, but the Blue Card is not used all that much in some EU countries (for example, here in France).

If your employer-to-be is processing a work permit for you, I'd let them complete the process. Sixty to 90 days is actually not too bad for these sorts of things, and chances are a Blue Card would take at least that long.
Cheers,
Bev
Thanks Bevdeforges for the reply. Czech does have option for BC as I checked on their official website, however I need to see if I can convince to-be employer for BC, which brings along better benefits than EC specially flexibility to move across EU nations after 18 months of stay in Czech.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Hello Expat16,

Thank you for the response and I see from where you are coming from, given the huge benefits BC bring along.

You are spot-on about EC, which is nothing but long term residence permit - employment visa, hooked to a specific employer within Czech.

If the to-be employer for obvious reasons emphasizes on EC, is there a way to apply for BC by myself or BC can't be issued in parallel to EC?

Cheers. :tea:
I think all such applications must be submitted by the employer. If it is the same as NL, then you can change your permit to BC at any point.

Perhaps the EC costs less and that is why your employer prefers that? If that's the case you can offer to pay the difference?


BC also normally requires getting your degree evaluated by an agency, so that would take longer too. So perhaps if employer is worried about timing, go with EC first and try to change as soon as you are there.

I think BC normally requires a contract that is valid for another 12 months, so if you only have a 1 yr contract for now, you will not have the chance to apply later. Although they are changing the law (or changed it recently?) to only require a 6 month contract.

I think you are within your rights to demand the permit that more benefits you. I would be wary of an employer that interferes with this. It is you after all who is leaving your own country and taking the bigger risk!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top