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Last Friday, whilst preparing dinner, Letitia dropped a heavy Pyrex jug which hit her ankle. The jug smashed into pieces when it hit the floor and she had a seemingly insignificant cut from this. By bed-time, her ankle was sore and she found it difficult to walk on it. By Saturday morning, however, it had swollen up and looked badly bruised - she was unable to put any weight on it whatsoever and it was extremely painful to even touch. Time for the hospital, I said, in order to find out if there were any bones broken. Although we have private medical insurance, I thought that an X Ray at Polis Hospital would be the most expedient route. Here is our first experience of healthcare in Cyprus.

1. Polis Hospital (A&E). This was our first port of call, and as there were no other outpatients there, we were seen straight away. As it was a Saturday, there was no radiographer there, so after strapping the ankle, they sent us to Paphos General Hospital for an X Ray. They also told us that if it was broken, any further treatment would have to be carried out in Paphos as there would not be an orthopaedic doctor in Polis Hospital until September. We paid €10 registration fee and used our EHIC. They told us to make sure that we showed our receipt to Paphos Hospital in order not to have to pay again. The doctor also filled out the paperwork for an X Ray and told us to go straight there, before A&E. We found Polis to be a very friendly, efficient, helpful and clean hospital.

2. Paphos Hospital (X Ray Dept). There was no-one else awaiting X Rays, so we were called forward immediately. Very clean, efficient and friendly service.

3. Paphos Hospital (A&E). A&E was very quiet with only 2 other out patients being seen to. There were plenty of nursing staff on duty, and as far as we could ascertain, one doctor. The first thing we were told to do was register and pay €10. At the registration desk, I showed my receipt from Polis Hospital. Letitia was then put onto the system and the necessary paperwork was given to us. It took around 10 minutes for the doctor to see us. She said that the X Ray indicated no broken bones, but due to the pain and a haematoma on the ankle, Letitia would need a half cast. This was done straight away - no waiting. The doctor prescribed painkillers and advised us to purchase crutches from any pharmacy where we planned to pick up the painkillers. From previous experience, we knew that Letitia would not get on with crutches, so we planned to hire a wheelchair (more on this later). We were given a piece of paper to return to the Orthopaedic Department on Wednesday between 0700 and 1000. All in all, we found the A&E Dept to be clean, well staffed and whilst noticeably less friendly than Polis Hospital, it was very efficient.

4. Paphos General Hospital (Main Car Park). Wednesday morning. What can I say? It was full. There were vehicles parked everywhere and anywhere - double yellow lines, hatched off areas, blue badge spaces with no blue badges displayed etc. Letitia was now in a wheelchair, and the short route from the car park to the hospital is certainly not wheelchair friendly. Although I managed to get her up the very steep kerb onto the footpath, our way was blocked by not one, but 3 'double cab' pick up trucks which were parked on the footpath.

5. Paphos Hospital (Orthopaedic Department). OMG! What an experience! We arrived here at around 0900 and it was extremely busy, with no-one manning the front reception desk. I counted 36 people in front of us, although some may have been with a patient rather than a patient themselves. After 15 mins, someone emerged from the 'cast room' and 3 or 4 people tried to thrust their paperwork into her hands, she deftly waved them away and went back in. At this point, I thought that I needed to establish that we were in the right place so I went round the corner to another reception desk. She told me that I needed to pay €6 at the cashiers office and then to return to where I had left Letitia. Yes, we were in the right place! I then decided that, having paid for private medical insurance, we needed to now make use of it and we left. The Orthopaedic Department was clearly understaffed, highly disorganised with no visible system of seeing patients in any order and very uncomfortable. There were not enough seats and no form of air conditioning - not even any fans.

6. Evangelismos Private Hospital Paphos. The only private hospital we had previously used in Cyprus was St George's where we had our insurance medicals completed. However, I had heard or read advertisements for Evangelismos Hospital in "Paphos, Peyia and Polis". I thought that by going here, if any further treatment was necessary, it could be done in Polis. Parking right in front of the main doors - no problem. Being seen by an Orthopaedic specialist - no problem. Without an appointment, we had a 5 minute wait. He removed the half cast, examined the ankle and directed us to the X Ray Dept where we were seen immediately (€45 charge). Armed with the X Ray pictures, we went back to the Orthopaedic doctor and once again - no waiting. He confirmed that there was no break (we had been informed that sometimes a break takes a few days to be detectable on an X Ray). After some advice about aftercare, we were able to leave with no requirement for any further treatment. We paid €50 for his time and stayed for a cup of coffee in the lovely, cool cafeteria. Evangelismos Hospital was clean, well staffed, friendly, efficient and comfortable with air conditioning throughout and free wi-fi on every floor to keep you amused in the unlikely event that you are hanging around. A great experience all round, and I would have no hesitation in recommending Evangelismos to others.

I know that not everyone is in a position to use private hospitals, and I dread to think of the time when we, through age or finances, may not be able to use them in the future. However, I do believe that for a 'one off' situation like ours, they are well worth the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Before leaving Paphos General Hospital, I asked where we could temporarily hire a wheelchair. I was told that during normal hours on a weekday, the Red Cross place near the old courthouse in Paphos had wheelchairs which could be borrowed at no charge. As it was a Saturday and we live in Polis, this was not much use to us, but worth noting for future reference.

I asked the same question in the Pharmacy where I picked up Letitia's prescription. He gave us a number to ring. Despite the fact that it was now 5pm on a Saturday, by ringing the number and speaking to a very helpful Nicki, we were able to get the sort of wheelchair we wanted (ie one which Letitia could wheel herself around in if she wished) and also one suited to her height and weight within half an hour. It cost €50 for a week. Although the company is based in Polis, they deliver to Paphos. We have no vested interest in this company, so we are not advertising, but we do recommend them. They hire out various items for the disabled - pool hoists, commodes, mobility scooters etc and they also offer an airport transfer service.

GC Paraquip Cyprus mobility scooter hire, wheelchair hire, adapted airport transfers in Cyprus, equipment sale, care or nurse hire. Disabled, wheelchair user? For a holiday in Cyprus, GC Paraquip arranges rental of electric hoists and other equipment
 

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I hope Letitias ankle is better very soon.
Like you we have found that if you can afford to go private it is far less stressful than using the general hospital in Paphos.
I use the general for my bi-monthly blood tests then take the results to my Rheumatologist at the Iasis. Saves me a fortune. So by using a mixture of private and State healthcare it works fairly well for us.
 

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Hi, for those in Larnaca we have found the Health care hit and miss too. As I have HHT( hereditary haemorragic talectangtasia) and need frequent blood transfusions and monitoring we too have found the private hospital system very good. We use St Raphael private hospital behind alpha mega supermarket. It is clean and friendly, there is a matron that speaks very good English and the doctors are very kind and efficient. Due to my condition I need monitoring by the cardiac specialist and the gastroenterologist as well who visit me on the ward without charging. I highly recommend he hospital!! Christine
 

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Ah yes the pleasures of parking at Paphos general! What a nightmare, I had to take my daughter back to the orthopaedic dept last week too. I dropped reasonably close to an entrance then went to find a space..a long way away past double parked cars, cars parked in bays which were not meant to be parked in, on paths diagonally etc. If you had a clamping business you could get rich very quick there(and the Mall too). The orthopaedic clinic as mentioned is utter chaos, no organisation people queue jumping. One lady had been there since 7 a.m and was there still at 11 waiting while others who came after went in. Whatever time you turn up with a child you can jump in ahead, no number system..no system. No air. We waitied 3 half hours too then my daughters break was re bandaged and a support cast added. Not a fan of the general anyway but won't go on. Will not be returning if at all possible either. Why is Paphos so bad? Limassol is a far better hospital, clean, friendly and they communicate with you!
I agree that when needed in the future and funds permit, private is the best way. BUT there should not be such a wide difference between private and general in care and organisation.
This too is a personal view!
 

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hope Letitia's on the mend guys,
can people use the private hospitals & just pay for treatment without having first signed up for insurance?
& if you do have insurance do you get to claim back the cash you paid hospital?
 

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For registration purposes you cannot just say you are going to pay. You must have health insurance. When you are registered there is nothing to stop you cancelling the policy and just paying your way.

If you have insurance the hospital normally bills the insurance company directly.

Pete
 

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For registration purposes you cannot just say you are going to pay. You must have health insurance. When you are registered there is nothing to stop you cancelling the policy and just paying your way.

If you have insurance the hospital normally bills the insurance company directly.

Pete
correct!
David paid 45 euro for x-ray & 50 euro for doctors time
, is that the total cost of Letitia's treatment or does David's insurance pay the rest of any costs at the private hospital?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
hope Letitia's on the mend guys,
can people use the private hospitals & just pay for treatment without having first signed up for insurance?
& if you do have insurance do you get to claim back the cash you paid hospital?
Thank you! Letitia is well on the road to recovery now.

To clarify, €95 was the total cost of Letitia's treatment and yes - we could claim it back on our medical insurance as I have all the receipts and we have no excess to pay. Although we have a rather good medical insurance policy, and I had in my possession the Atlantic issued plastic cards with our policy numbers inscribed to prove it, we were not asked for any such details when registering at Evangelismos Hospital and just paid for the treatment received.

I have decided, however, that it is probably not in my best financial interest to claim €95 back, as it's 'probably' more financially advantageous to have a no claims discount applied when I renew the policy next January. I suppose that it all depends on what the future holds for us during the next 6 months...
 

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Last Friday, whilst preparing dinner, Letitia dropped a heavy Pyrex jug which hit her ankle. The jug smashed into pieces when it hit the floor and she had a seemingly insignificant cut from this. By bed-time, her ankle was sore and she found it difficult to walk on it. By Saturday morning, however, it had swollen up and looked badly bruised - she was unable to put any weight on it whatsoever and it was extremely painful to even touch. Time for the hospital, I said, in order to find out if there were any bones broken. Although we have private medical insurance, I thought that an X Ray at Polis Hospital would be the most expedient route. Here is our first experience of healthcare in Cyprus.

1. Polis Hospital (A&E). This was our first port of call, and as there were no other outpatients there, we were seen straight away. As it was a Saturday, there was no radiographer there, so after strapping the ankle, they sent us to Paphos General Hospital for an X Ray. They also told us that if it was broken, any further treatment would have to be carried out in Paphos as there would not be an orthopaedic doctor in Polis Hospital until September. We paid €10 registration fee and used our EHIC. They told us to make sure that we showed our receipt to Paphos Hospital in order not to have to pay again. The doctor also filled out the paperwork for an X Ray and told us to go straight there, before A&E. We found Polis to be a very friendly, efficient, helpful and clean hospital.

2. Paphos Hospital (X Ray Dept). There was no-one else awaiting X Rays, so we were called forward immediately. Very clean, efficient and friendly service.

3. Paphos Hospital (A&E). A&E was very quiet with only 2 other out patients being seen to. There were plenty of nursing staff on duty, and as far as we could ascertain, one doctor. The first thing we were told to do was register and pay €10. At the registration desk, I showed my receipt from Polis Hospital. Letitia was then put onto the system and the necessary paperwork was given to us. It took around 10 minutes for the doctor to see us. She said that the X Ray indicated no broken bones, but due to the pain and a haematoma on the ankle, Letitia would need a half cast. This was done straight away - no waiting. The doctor prescribed painkillers and advised us to purchase crutches from any pharmacy where we planned to pick up the painkillers. From previous experience, we knew that Letitia would not get on with crutches, so we planned to hire a wheelchair (more on this later). We were given a piece of paper to return to the Orthopaedic Department on Wednesday between 0700 and 1000. All in all, we found the A&E Dept to be clean, well staffed and whilst noticeably less friendly than Polis Hospital, it was very efficient.

4. Paphos General Hospital (Main Car Park). Wednesday morning. What can I say? It was full. There were vehicles parked everywhere and anywhere - double yellow lines, hatched off areas, blue badge spaces with no blue badges displayed etc. Letitia was now in a wheelchair, and the short route from the car park to the hospital is certainly not wheelchair friendly. Although I managed to get her up the very steep kerb onto the footpath, our way was blocked by not one, but 3 'double cab' pick up trucks which were parked on the footpath.

5. Paphos Hospital (Orthopaedic Department). OMG! What an experience! We arrived here at around 0900 and it was extremely busy, with no-one manning the front reception desk. I counted 36 people in front of us, although some may have been with a patient rather than a patient themselves. After 15 mins, someone emerged from the 'cast room' and 3 or 4 people tried to thrust their paperwork into her hands, she deftly waved them away and went back in. At this point, I thought that I needed to establish that we were in the right place so I went round the corner to another reception desk. She told me that I needed to pay €6 at the cashiers office and then to return to where I had left Letitia. Yes, we were in the right place! I then decided that, having paid for private medical insurance, we needed to now make use of it and we left. The Orthopaedic Department was clearly understaffed, highly disorganised with no visible system of seeing patients in any order and very uncomfortable. There were not enough seats and no form of air conditioning - not even any fans.

6. Evangelismos Private Hospital Paphos. The only private hospital we had previously used in Cyprus was St George's where we had our insurance medicals completed. However, I had heard or read advertisements for Evangelismos Hospital in "Paphos, Peyia and Polis". I thought that by going here, if any further treatment was necessary, it could be done in Polis. Parking right in front of the main doors - no problem. Being seen by an Orthopaedic specialist - no problem. Without an appointment, we had a 5 minute wait. He removed the half cast, examined the ankle and directed us to the X Ray Dept where we were seen immediately (€45 charge). Armed with the X Ray pictures, we went back to the Orthopaedic doctor and once again - no waiting. He confirmed that there was no break (we had been informed that sometimes a break takes a few days to be detectable on an X Ray). After some advice about aftercare, we were able to leave with no requirement for any further treatment. We paid €50 for his time and stayed for a cup of coffee in the lovely, cool cafeteria. Evangelismos Hospital was clean, well staffed, friendly, efficient and comfortable with air conditioning throughout and free wi-fi on every floor to keep you amused in the unlikely event that you are hanging around. A great experience all round, and I would have no hesitation in recommending Evangelismos to others.

I know that not everyone is in a position to use private hospitals, and I dread to think of the time when we, through age or finances, may not be able to use them in the future. However, I do believe that for a 'one off' situation like ours, they are well worth the money.
As a diabetic I use the Paphos General. Works very well, the diabetes consultant is said to be the best in Cyprus and she is good. Only problem is that she is very much booked and you have to wait 3-4 months for an appointment. You can however go to the diabetes nurse whenever you want.
Outside the doctors room is a list with all appointments that day and it works well. However it seem that many on the list does not show up.

For me, using General is a must, I would never have the funds to pay for the insulin and other medication over the counter.

Because I work as self-employed, the social contribution cost me a little more than 100 € per month. I would never get a private insurance that cover the diabetes or any conditions related to that( blood pressure, heart problems, etc)

The only thing I do private is the yearly eye test to look for bleeding. This is done in a very old-fashioned way at the hospital, you have a disabled eye-sight all day and can't drive home after the test. Instead I go to a private optician that can do the test digital. It take ten minutes and cost 20€ if you don't buy glasses in the same place, then it is free
 

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I spent a week in the orthopaedic department of Paphos General.

There is no doubt in my mind that when I went through the door of the orthopaedic department I went through the entrance to hell.

Fortunately I survived the broken beds, ripped mattresses, inadequate uncaring nursing, pompous egocentric consultants, lack of diagnosis, lack of treatment and deliberately untreated bedsore.

Pete
 

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Dennis had a hernia repaired at the general.
While the op was ok the after care was terrible and the ward was filthy. I had to clean the bathroom before Dennis used it because one of the other patients had bled all over the floor and wash basin and no one was bothering to clean it up.
About two months after the op he started getting terrible pain and was told there is nothing wrong wrong it will get better. It did not, and after a year of severe pain he went to see a specialist privately who immediately said I know what it is and I can cure it. The mesh which was used to cover the hernia was too big and was rubbing on a nerve. Two days later he was in a private hospital, half an hour after arriving he was in theatre, the excess mesh was trimmed off and he was out of pain at last.
That cost €1400 which we were more than happy to pay. We do have insurance but we have an excess of €800 so we didn't bother to claim on that occasion.
So our experience of the general is not good, I know others will have had good experience and to extent it will depend on who your consultant is and which ward you are in.
 

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Dennis had a hernia repaired at the general.
While the op was ok the after care was terrible and the ward was filthy. I had to clean the bathroom before Dennis used it because one of the other patients had bled all over the floor and wash basin and no one was bothering to clean it up.
About two months after the op he started getting terrible pain and was told there is nothing wrong wrong it will get better. It did not, and after a year of severe pain he went to see a specialist privately who immediately said I know what it is and I can cure it. The mesh which was used to cover the hernia was too big and was rubbing on a nerve. Two days later he was in a private hospital, half an hour after arriving he was in theatre, the excess mesh was trimmed off and he was out of pain at last.
That cost €1400 which we were more than happy to pay. We do have insurance but we have an excess of €800 so we didn't bother to claim on that occasion.
So our experience of the general is not good, I know others will have had good experience and to extent it will depend on who your consultant is and which ward you are in.
I would also think twice before any op. As an out patient you don't see the problems.

And most of the staff is UK trained so it should be OK.
 

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.

And most of the staff is UK trained so it should be OK.
Where did you get this information from?

I would very much doubt that any of the nursing staff I encountered were UK trained.

If so they would have shown some characteristics of caring for their patient, would have known how to help prevent bedsores and how to treat any that occurred and not turn up to work with heavy colds and coughs that sounded terminal.

Pete
 

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Where did you get this information from?

I would very much doubt that any of the nursing staff I encountered were UK trained.

If so they would have shown some characteristics of caring for their patient, would have known how to help prevent bedsores and how to treat any that occurred and not turn up to work with heavy colds and coughs that sounded terminal.

Pete
Sorry I should have written doctors

I am sure that the majority of the doctors are trained in UK. Some are not, my GP is Russian trained, but good for renewing prescriptions. My Diabetes consultant is UK trained.
 

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And most of the staff is UK trained so it should be OK.
I saw absolutely no evidence that any of the staff are UK trained. The after care was abysmal, the attitude to patients was terrible and as many of them didn't speak more than a few words of English I would think it would be impossible for them to be trained in the UK.
The doctors are a different matter, they are mostly ok and speak good English but the nursing staff are awful.
 

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I saw absolutely no evidence that any of the staff are UK trained. The after care was abysmal, the attitude to patients was terrible and as many of them didn't speak more than a few words of English I would think it would be impossible for them to be trained in the UK.
The doctors are a different matter, they are mostly ok and speak good English but the nursing staff are awful.
because I am an out patient and only meet doctors I have no experience of the nursing staff
 

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As a UK trained nurse and midwife there is no way the nursing staff at the general have been trained to any standard like the NHS. I know there is talk of a National Health SCHEME being implemented here which is forever being postponed for whatever reason. Lack of bedside manner, communication and infection control are major flaws at the General. It needs an authority from EU or similar to actually come see what it is like. Limassol is not like this nor I am told is Nicosia general.
 
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