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Discussion Starter #1
In a couple of rooms there are some curtain rod supports which appear to be made of 1/4" square metal and very firmly fixed into the wall. Before I start butchering the place, does anyone know how these are fixed? I need to remove them as they are in the wrong place.
 

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Are there any sort of visible screw heads in the mounts? Normally, the thingees that hold the curtain rods are screwed into the wall with rather long screws and the holes drilled into the wall are lined with dübels (that's what they're called in Germany) - I think they're called "chevilles" in French. But in any event, they're little plastic things that you pound into the hole you drill in the wall and they hold the screw much more firmly.

You may want to check to see if the square metal bit you're describing is perhaps a cover that can be popped off to reveal the screws and dübels.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The square metal bits are over 3" long sticking straight out from the wall. There are no visible fixings at all
 

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The square metal bits are over 3" long sticking straight out from the wall. There are no visible fixings at all
OK, can you unscrew the square metal bits directly? It's possible that they are basically a sort of big screw set into a dübel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I will give that a try tomorrow, thank you
 

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The square metal bits are over 3" long sticking straight out from the wall. There are no visible fixings at all
See if you can lift them up - they may well be of the type that slip over the fixture (you know, like towel rails and the like). They may be a bit stiff, blocked to some extent by paint, etc., but it seems to me that this is what you have (they are not uncommon).
 

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Sometimes there is a cover on the support hiding the screws. Have a look.

Ikea do that. It usually pulls off from the bottom.

But I am guessing that...

The support itself is 'twisted' into the wall and fixed with one large screw.

Try untwisting the whole support anticlockwise. It will come out like that.
 

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If your house is an ancient dwelling with stone walls covered with plaster, your curtain rod supports may well be cemented into the wall.

If the wall's made of plasterboard or hollow brick, then they'll be screwed into a plastic or metal rawlplug.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Okay thanks for the input, I'll report back tomorrow
 

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If your house is VERY old, they may even be leaded in... (Fixed into a chiselled hole in the stone, using molten lead as adhesive/filler).

I think from your description we have the same sort in our house. Getting them out is a *****. Putting them back, almost impossible. We left ours and worked around it.

Regards



Ian
 

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Our house was "modernised" in the 1970's.

I don't know if this was ever a general system, or bricolage by the previous owner, but the curtain rod in one room was supported by two solid square section steel rods, about 1/4" diameter and 6" long, with a point at one end, driven into the brick wall.

There were vertical pins about 1/4" long at the other ends, which I assumed were originally designed to hold something fancier than the round wooden rod which was sitting loose on the supports.

I removed the supports when I insulated the inside of the wall, by hammering them gently from side to side until they were loosened.

EDIT: I just found a picture of something similar Atelier de forge ROBERT & ROBERT : Tringles anciennes

Scroll down and click on the image of the yellow curtain. Maybe the original bar was missing from ours.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Our house was "modernised" in the 1970's.

I don't know if this was ever a general system, or bricolage by the previous owner, but the curtain rod in one room was supported by two solid square section steel rods, about 1/4" diameter and 6" long, with a point at one end, driven into the brick wall.

There were screws about 1/2" long tapped vertically into the other ends, which I assumed were originally designed to hold something fancier than the round wooden rod which was sitting loose on the supports.

I removed the supports when I insulated the inside of the wall, by hammering them gently from side to side until they were loosened.

EDIT: I just found a picture of something similar Atelier de forge ROBERT & ROBERT : Tringles anciennes

Scroll down and click on the image of the yellow curtain. Maybe the original bar was missing from ours.
That's them all right. I tried twisting with a pair of mole grips but apart from a very slight movement - nothing. I'll try hammering as well and I have considered cutting them off with a Dremel (or similar) but the mess will be an issue. I may just hacksaw them short to the wall and disguise them with the new curtain rod supports.

More later
 

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That's them all right. I tried twisting with a pair of mole grips but apart from a very slight movement - nothing. I'll try hammering as well and I have considered cutting them off with a Dremel (or similar) but the mess will be an issue. I may just hacksaw them short to the wall and disguise them with the new curtain rod supports.

More later
Those are the same as ours. They obviously go a long way in...

Regards

Ian
 

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If your house is VERY old, they may even be leaded in... (Fixed into a chiselled hole in the stone, using molten lead as adhesive/filler). ..................
I mentioned our house was modernised in the 1970's, but it was apparently converted in the 1900's from an even older building which was a brickworks with some living accommodation.

So the supports which I took out of the wall could have been antiques.
 

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Well, those certainly don't date from the 1970s, or even the 60s. When you purchase an old home, you have to expect that there will be issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well, those certainly don't date from the 1970s, or even the 60s. When you purchase an old home, you have to expect that there will be issues.
Our house was built in the 1960's - always expect issues, this was just to see if anyone had a method of removing them.
 

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Our house was built in the 1960's - always expect issues, this was just to see if anyone had a method of removing them.
Whack it with a hammer then fill the hole.

Even if it was screwed in, you will still have to fill the holes.

A larger hole does not change much. You still have to fill the hole.
 

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Our house was built in the 1960's - always expect issues, this was just to see if anyone had a method of removing them.
Nonetheless, not necessarily usual in 1960's builds, though of course the area where you live might also be a factor.

And I apologise, I should have said when you buy an old home you should expect the unexpected (and clearly you did). The older the home, the more likely you are to come across unexpected things, of course, even if renovations have previously been done. Of course, when it comes to renovations (on homes of any era), the bricoleur issue, especially the mauvais bricoleur.
 

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... I'll try hammering as well and I have considered cutting them off with a Dremel (or similar) but the mess will be an issue. I may just hacksaw them short to the wall and disguise them with the new curtain rod supports...
A Dremel tool is unlikely to do the trick as the blades and bits are not really intended for iron. You might try drilling out the anchor. Start with a fairly small metal bit, say 5 or 6mm. Then drill progressively larger until you can pry out the remaining material. You don't need to remove the entire anchor, only enough to create a nice cavity you can fill with patching plaster.

You could also use an angle grinder. It would be faster and easier than a hacksaw and you'd also end up with a flush surface (after a little grinding). However, an angle grinder is a fairly dangerous tool if you have never used one before.

Or... you could ask around for "un Homme à tout faire."
 
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Discussion Starter #20
A Dremel tool is unlikely to do the trick as the blades and bits are not really intended for iron. You might try drilling out the anchor. Start with a fairly small metal bit, say 5 or 6mm. Then drill progressively larger until you can pry out the remaining material. You don't need to remove the entire anchor, only enough to create a nice cavity you can fill with patching plaster.

You could also use an angle grinder. It would be faster and easier than a hacksaw and you'd also end up with a flush surface (after a little grinding). However, an angle grinder is a fairly dangerous tool if you have never used one before.

Or... you could ask around for "un Homme à tout faire."

All good suggestions, thanks. Grinding or any form of power cutting is going to create too much mess for the area so I'm leaning towards the hacksaw and drilling idea.

Cheers
 
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