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Hi Everyone,
I know its a strange question but I am looking everywhere for fresh (or frozen) cranberries....Not canned. Or unsweetened cranberry juice. I have not found them anywhere in Merida and would happily ship them here if they are sold in another part of the country. Thank you for any help on the matter.
 

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Hi Everyone,
I know its a strange question but I am looking everywhere for fresh (or frozen) cranberries....Not canned. Or unsweetened cranberry juice. I have not found them anywhere in Merida and would happily ship them here if they are sold in another part of the country. Thank you for any help on the matter.
I see dried cranberries in the mercados all the time. Would that help?
 

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Mega, Costco, and others, carry the juice, "jugo de arándanos agrios" (or 'rojos').
If you are looking for the berries, look for "arándanos agrios" or "arándanos rojos".
"Arándanos azules" are blueberries and are often found next to the cranberries; dried or frozen.
 

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Mega, Costco, and others, carry the juice, "jugo de arándanos agrios" (or 'rojos').
If you are looking for the berries, look for "arándanos agrios" or "arándanos rojos".
"Arándanos azules" are blueberries and are often found next to the cranberries; dried or frozen.
For some reason, the fresh blueberries I find at Superama are called "blueberries". I wonder why the Spanish term isn't used. And these are Mexican blueberries, not imported from an English-speaking country!
 

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Many berries, and other fruits and vegetables, are grown in Mexico and packaged for the US market. Driscoll Farms, and others, have large operations around Lake Chapala. Also, since such berries weren't native here, the word, 'arándanos' seems to apply to any number of them and can be confusing, even with the adjective. Besides, Superama is a Walmart specialty store catering to the 'exotic' foreign products at higher prices.
 

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Many berries, and other fruits and vegetables, are grown in Mexico and packaged for the US market. Driscoll Farms, and others, have large operations around Lake Chapala. Also, since such berries weren't native here, the word, 'arándanos' seems to apply to any number of them and can be confusing, even with the adjective. Besides, Superama is a Walmart specialty store catering to the 'exotic' foreign products at higher prices.
Before Walmart bought Superama, the one in my middle-class, but not elegant neighborhood was an ordinary supermarket, and I don't see that it's changed much over the years. The blueberries I buy are grown and packaged in Mexico for the Mexican market. I think the use of "blueberry" instead of a Spanish equivalent is part of the pattern that finds using English "cooler" than using Spanish. Santa Clara ice cream parlors offer "blueberry" ice cream, and Santa Clara is a Mexican company, with no ties to the US, as far as I know.
 

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Rollybrook's food translation page

Before Walmart bought Superama, the one in my middle-class, but not elegant neighborhood was an ordinary supermarket, and I don't see that it's changed much over the years. The blueberries I buy are grown and packaged in Mexico for the Mexican market. I think the use of "blueberry" instead of a Spanish equivalent is part of the pattern that finds using English "cooler" than using Spanish. Santa Clara ice cream parlors offer "blueberry" ice cream, and Santa Clara is a Mexican company, with no ties to the US, as far as I know.
Rollybrook's food translation page explained the naming of berries very well in English. It is quite interesting.

The Superama is very expensive the last few times I went there except their huge deli prepared foods. It is a short 15 walk from our old house in SLP. I walk 20 mins. the other direction to the HEB which is a wonderful supermarket.
 

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Rollybrook's food translation page explained the naming of berries very well in English. It is quite interesting.

The Superama is very expensive the last few times I went there except their huge deli prepared foods. It is a short 15 walk from our old house in SLP. I walk 20 mins. the other direction to the HEB which is a wonderful supermarket.
Unfortunately for my food budget, the only supermarket within walking distance for me is the Superama, just a 10-minute walk from my apartment. I just suck up the prices and enjoy the convenience.
 

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Great

Unfortunately for my food budget, the only supermarket within walking distance for me is the Superama, just a 10-minute walk from my apartment. I just suck up the prices and enjoy the convenience.
I'd rather walk than drive. Us seniors are really into that as a part of our staying fit. Their deli is great and the fairly expensive fruits and produce can be bought at the mercardo or weekly las tianguis set up on a street somewhere. We make a trip to Walmart once a week to save on other foods and household goods, We by the case of milk RVgringo does and really you can save a lot there and at Costco [we buy for my wife's mom and dad also, their 3 maids get a meal or two a day]. I still like the local bakeries and cosinas economicas everywhere.
 

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I'd rather walk than drive. Us seniors are really into that as a part of our staying fit. Their deli is great and the fairly expensive fruits and produce can be bought at the mercardo or weekly las tianguis set up on a street somewhere. We make a trip to Walmart once a week to save on other foods and household goods, We by the case of milk RVgringo does and really you can save a lot there and at Costco [we buy for my wife's mom and dad also, their 3 maids get a meal or two a day]. I still like the local bakeries and cosinas economicas everywhere.
Before I officially became a "senior", I walked everywhere, in any country that I lived in, because I haven't had a car since 1970! In my neighborhood, the mercado isn't much cheaper than than the supermarket, so I choose to do all my shopping in one place. Since I live alone and don't cook all that much, I prefer convenience to saving a few pesos. If I had a family to shop for, including the maids, of course, I'd have a different attitude about the whole thing.
 

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Produce

Before I officially became a "senior", I walked everywhere, in any country that I lived in, because I haven't had a car since 1970! In my neighborhood, the mercado isn't much cheaper than than the supermarket, so I choose to do all my shopping in one place. Since I live alone and don't cook all that much, I prefer convenience to saving a few pesos. If I had a family to shop for, including the maids, of course, I'd have a different attitude about the whole thing.
I noticed the prices of produce are good in SLP at all the supermarkets but supermarkets are twice as much as the las tianguis in Mexicali. The local bakeries charge more than Soriana's bakery unless we are buying near her parent's house which is an area of lower working class.
 

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Cranberries are grown in northern climates in seasonally flooded pastures. Do not expect to find fresh ones in Mexico, unless imported.

Technically, there is almost no area in Mexico where these bushes could be grown.
 
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