Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am experiencing some complications obtaining documents to renew my titre de sejour.

Friends I've been staying with (who provided docs for my French visa) are: 1. renting on a long-expired rental agreement, and 2. won't have a new place and rental agreement until well after my scheduled interview to renew the titre de sejour (visitors).

So, what happens if someone stays in-country for several months, without a current residency permit, then returns to the U.S. 8-10 months later?

Will there be penalties at the Schengen port of exit? Penalties from French customs agents? Prohibited to re-enter France for.... years?

Just wondering what my options are. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bit of background... my friends are French, and were my close neighbors in L.A. for some 15 years before moving to Paris in 2013. I now stay with them.

About 1 year ago when applying for my visa at the French Consulate L.A., my friends provided a copy of their rental agreement and other required docs, including a "letter of invitation."

The 3-year agreement was expired by 7 months at that time, and the interviewer last October noted it and asked me about it. I pleaded the 5th.

During my interview with a OFII official later, the expired rental agreement came-up again. Not speaking French very well... I just shrugged my shoulders.

So I have my doubts that the local Prefecture will give me a pass this time around. Does this help?
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
Why not just use the original agreement and the last three months of rent receipts? I'm assuming the contract has just rolled over and not been officially terminated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hmmm. That's a good thought and current receipts are readily available, so maybe worth a try.

If the interviewer at the Prefecture is not happy about this, maybe the delay will allow time for a permanent solution.

But, when all else fails, what happens if the Prefecture says this is not satisfactory (after I've purchased/presented the stamps 270€)? How much time do they allow for someone to exit the country? How is it enforced? Penalities?
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
Hmmm. That's a good thought and current receipts are readily available, so maybe worth a try.

If the interviewer at the Prefecture is not happy about this, maybe the delay will allow time for a permanent solution.

But, when all else fails, what happens if the Prefecture says this is not satisfactory (after I've purchased/presented the stamps 270€)? How much time do they allow for someone to exit the country? How is it enforced? Penalities?[/
QUOTE]

I don't think you need to worry about that - frankly the original contract and the rent receipts should suffice. If your friends are currently looking to move, just explain that to the Prefecture if they ask (but it's unlikely that they will as rental contracts most commonly just roll over in France).

TBH I wouldn't want to overstay, at least not by more than a month or two. I don't know the penalties though, but I would suspect that if the administration caught up with you, you would at least become persona non grata in France (unless perhaps you already had your ticket to leave and your departure was imminent).
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,364 Posts
I think the idea of getting an attestation de hébergement from your friends would be a good idea. If they are still paying rent on the original agreement and can provide you with the rent receipts for the last three months that should do it. (Could even include a sentence or two in the attestation to the effect that they intend on continuing to "héberge" you with them when they move.)

Staying in country without a carte de séjour isn't all that difficult - until and unless you need to show a carte de séjour for something. And it can be as simple as jumping the turnstile in the métro, or any other "little" thing where they want to see i.d. (Trust me on this one, I've been "sans papiers" here - you have to watch your p's and q's very carefully to avoid trouble.)
Cheers,
Bev
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top