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We are contemplating a two year move to UK with our ten year old daughter but are having a very difficult time wading through the information on schools.

Schooling is our primary concern and we know that we will return to the US in time for her high school.

Where are the good locations around (or in London) for a 10 year old to go to school for one or two years that are also cost affordable (or no fee)? Our company has locations in central London (Paddington) and Reading so anywhere on that line would be fine.

We understand we could send her to a fee-school that would be great but really want her to experience the British school system. However, we have read horror stories about some of the schools and the ranking web sites we have checked leave us utterly baffled.

Any experience with a 10 year old and schooling that you have had, and locations, would be greatly appreciated.

Many, many thanks in advance!
 

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We are contemplating a two year move to UK with our ten year old daughter but are having a very difficult time wading through the information on schools.

Schooling is our primary concern and we know that we will return to the US in time for her high school.

Where are the good locations around (or in London) for a 10 year old to go to school for one or two years that are also cost affordable (or no fee)? Our company has locations in central London (Paddington) and Reading so anywhere on that line would be fine.

We understand we could send her to a fee-school that would be great but really want her to experience the British school system. However, we have read horror stories about some of the schools and the ranking web sites we have checked leave us utterly baffled.

Any experience with a 10 year old and schooling that you have had, and locations, would be greatly appreciated.

Many, many thanks in advance!
British schools have a system whereby they have to publish there "SAT" results (exams the children take at the end of each school year). These results are commonly known as "league tables". So you can choose a school/area where they are at their best!! I always like to see schools "in action" as well, not so much the kids in the classroom stuff, but I personally think you can tell alot by watching the children go in and out of school - are they noisy, unruly, tidy, happy, fighting, misbehaving, laughing, swearing, - just how they seem in general. I'm not a great fan in simply chatting to the Head teacher, cos they're gonna say their school is best!!
The problem you may have is that there maybe more than one school servicing your chosen area - and the chances are you'll be guided to the under-subscribed school, which IMO could be undersubscribed for a reason!

Jo xxx
 

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Those whose birthday falls before 1st September start their Year 6 (last year in primary school) from September of that year. The following year they move up to a secondary school to start Year 7. So depending on your daughter's birthday, she may have to change school after a year, with all the permutations and choices that entail. Normally, finding place in a state school (non-fee paying), other than at normal entry points, is on a place available basis. Most 'good' schools are full and don't have casual vacancies, and you often have to go on a waiting list until a place becomes available. The local authority (e.g. City of Westminster or Reading Borough) will try to find a school place, but it may not be at the most desirable or convenient school. Thing to do is once you know when and where in UK, get in touch with the relevant local authority and enquire about a school place. Once she is in Year 6, around October you will receive details of how to apply for a place at a secondary school of your choice.
Apart from non-denominational community or local authority schools, there are also many voluntary aided, mostly church schools belonging to Church of England (Episcopal) or Roman Catholic Church with distinct religious ethos. They tend to be popular among parents, as most also have good academic standard and discipline record. They tend to have their own admission policy, often involving the family's religious affiliation and observance.
It must be stressed that interrupting a child's education can have a detrimental effect when they eventually return home and try to reintegrate into the system there. While English school system is good and has high standards (normally), the syllabus and curriculum aren't exactly the same as in the US. Some children cope better than others with changes, but it's something you should give a serious consideration to. There are several US-curriculum schools in UK, but they are all private and fee-paying.
 

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Finding a good school in London is a bit difficult because of the mixed culture there. Moreover most of them are expensive.
 

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Finding a good school in London is a bit difficult because of the mixed culture there. Moreover most of them are expensive.
That is a nonsensical observation.

I know of excellent schools where the "mixed culture", as you put it, is prevalent.
 

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Finding a good school in London is a bit difficult because of the mixed culture there. Moreover most of them are expensive.
I'm not sure that your profile is reflecting your experience in the UK, its states you're from India and living in Denmark. Also I'm not sure I understand this comment!?????? The poster is requesting information on state schools

Jo xxx
 
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